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BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



VOLUME XXX 



CONTAINING LIFE SKETCHES OF LEADING CITIZENS OF 



WORCESTER COUNTY 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Who among; men art thou, and thy years how many, good friend ? — Xenophanes. 



BOSTON 

Biographical Review Publishing Company 

1899 



I^^aJIa^v^ t 



* F7Z 

X 
ATLANTIC STATES SERIES OF BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEWS. 



The volumes issued in this series up to date are the following: 



I. Otsego County, New York. XVIII. 

II. Madison County, New York. XIX. 

III. Broome County, New York. 

IV. Columbia County, New York. XX. 
V. Cayuga County, New York. 

VI. Delaware County, New York. XXI. 

VII. Livingston and Wyoming Counties, 

New York. XXII. 

VIII. Clinton and Essex Counties, New 

York. XXIII. 

IX. Hampden County, Massachusetts. 

X. Franklin County, Massachusetts. XXIV. 

XI. Hampshire County, Massachusetts. XXV. 

XII. Litchfield County, Connecticut. XXVI. 

XIII. York County, Maine. XXVII. 

XIV. Cumberland County, Maine. XXVIII. 

XV. Oxford and Franklin Counties, XXIX. 

Maine. 

XVI. Cumberland County, New Jersey. 

XVII. Rockingham County, New Hampshire. XXX. 



Plymouth County, Massachusetts. 
Camden and Burlington Counties, 
New Jersey. 

Sagadahoc, Lincoln, Knox, and 
Waldo Counties, Maine. 

Strafford and Belknap Counties, 
New Hampshire. 

Sullivan and Merrimack Counties, 
New Hampshire. 

hlllsboro and cheshire counties, 
New Hampshire. 

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Norfolk County, Massachusetts. 
New London County, Connecticut. 
Middlesex County, Massachusetts. 
Essex County, Massachusetts. 
Somerset, Piscataquis, Hancock, 

Washington, and Aroostook 

Counties, Maine. 
Worcester County, Massachusetts. 



Note. — All the biographical sketches published in this volume were submitted to their respective subjects or to the sub- 
scribers, from whom the facts were primarily obtained, for their approval or correction before going to press, and a reasonable 
time was allowed in each case for the return of the typewritten copies. Most of them were returned to us within the time allotted, 
or before the work was printed, after being corrected or revised; and' these may therefore be regarded as reasonably accurate. 

A few, however, were not returned to us ; and, as we have no means of knowing whether they contain errors or not, we 
cannot vouch for their accuracy. In justice to our readers, and to render this work more valuable for reference purposes, we have 
indicated all uncorrected sketches by a small asterisk (*/, placed immediately after the name of the subject. They will be found 
printed on the last pages of the book. 

B. R. PUB. CO. 



PREFACE. 



AFTER many months of unremitting toil we take pleasure in presenting to our 
patrons the long-promised Biographical Review of Worcester County, Massa- 
chusetts, the thirtieth in our Atlantic States Series of biographical works. In so 
doing we desire to render hearty thanks to all those who have in any way co-operated 
with us in our labors, realizing the full value of their sympathetic interest and ready 
assistance in the result obtained. We need at this day make no apology for the 
publication of such a volume, the success of previous works of a similar nature pub- 
lished by us having justified in advance the present issue. The real history of a State 
is the combined history of all its citizens. Popular biography is history intimately 
written, the dry bones of material facts being clothed with the living tissues of per- 
sonality and individuality, beneath which beats the pulse of human sympathy. It 
comprises the lives, not only of those whom genius, talent, or opportunity have 
brought conspicuously before the eye of the world, but of those also whose modest 
achievements have won a more local and restricted fame, each one, however, forming 
an integral portion of the great sum of human endeavor, and worthy of its due meed 
of praise, encouragement, or remembrance. To the question asked on the title-page 
of this volume, as it applies to the citizens of Worcester County herein represented, 
we have endeavored in each case to furnish an adequate reply. In many we have 
gone beyond the strict scope of personal biography in gathering and presenting gene- 
alogical data, compiled from hitherto unpublished family records ; and, where possible, 
we have verified other and similar data by comparison with records previously pub- 
lished, or accessible in manuscript form in the genealogical libraries of this city 
(Boston). The propriety and utility of preserving such material and giving it a wider 
publicity will be generally apparent, and our efforts in doing so, we trust, as generally 
appreciated. In conclusion, we venture to borrow in part the familiar and oft-quoted 
words of President Lincoln, and assert that the present volume is emphatically a book 
" of the people, by the people, and for the people." In the belief that it will be so 
accepted, we commit it finally to the judgment of our patrons. 

BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY. 
April, 1899. 




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BIOGRAPHICAL. 




ON. WILLIAM FRANKLIN 
DRAPER, of Hopedale, whose 
gallant efficiency in the field 
during the Civil War won for 
him the brevet of Brigadier- 
general, now occupies one of 
the highest posts in the diplo- 
matic service of the country, 
that of Ambassador to Italy, 
to which he was appointed by 
President McKinley in 1897. 
General Draper was born in the city of Lowell 
on April 9, 1842, eldest son of George and 
Hannah" (Thwing) Draper. He is a repre- 
sentative of the seventh generation of the 
family founded by James Draper, a native of 
Heptonstall Parish, Yorkshire, England, who 
joined the Massachusetts Bay Colony about 
1650. A glance at the ancestral record shows 
that his patriotism, his military spirit, his in- 
ventive genius and business capacity, and the 
liberality and kindliness which form the basis 
of his pleasing urbanity of manner are in- 
herited traits. 

James Draper, the immigrant, was the son 
of Thomas Draper, a cloth manufacturer of 
Heptonstall, England. He settled at Rox- 
bury, and engaged in the manufacture of 
cloth, owning a number of looms. His son, 
James Draper, second, was a soldier in King 
Philip's War. James Draper, third, son of 
James, second, and his wife, Abigail Whiting, 
settled at Dedham. He was a manufacturer 
and a farmer, and was captain of a trainband. 
He died in 1768. Abijah Draper, the next in 
this line of descent, born May 10, 1737, son 
of James, third, and Abigail (Child) Draper, 
married Alice, daughter of John and Elizabeth 
Eaton, of Dedham. Abijah Draper was a 



Major of the First Suffolk Militia in the 
Revolution. 

Ira Draper, General Draper's grandfather, 
born December 29, 1764, second son of Major 
Draper, lived to be past eighty years of 
age. "He was a man of large natural intelli- 
gence, mechanical ingenuity, and progressive 
thought." His first wife, Lydia, daughter of 
Lemuel and Rebecca Richards, died in 181 1; 
and his second wife, her sister, Abigail Rich- 
ards, died in 1847. He reared nine children. 

George Draper, second son of Ira and Abi- 
gail (Richards) Draper and the father of Am- 
bassador Draper, was born in Weston, Mass., 
August 16, 1817. He died June 7, 1887. 
Devoting his energies at an early age to the 
hereditary occupation of manufacturing, in 
1832 Mr. George Draper was superintendent 
of a mill at Ware, Mass. In 1842 he became 
a resident of Hopedale, joining the commu- 
nity under the leadership of the Rev. Adin 
Ballou, of which his brother, Ebenezer Dag- 
gett Draper, was one of the founders. This 
"joint-stock, practical Christian association, 
with a united industrial arrangement," was 
dissolved by common consent in the spring of 
1856, "property and business" returning "to 
the customary channels of general society." 
(For further particulars see History of Mil- 
ford, by Adin Ballou, to which we are in- 
debted for much of the foregoing.) 

The successor of the Hopedale community, 
it may be mentioned, the Hopedale Parish, a 
liberal Christian society, in which the com- 
munity was virtually merged, was organized 
in 1867, the Rev. Adin Ballou of sainted 
memory continuing his faithful ministry till 
April, 1880, when his resignation was ac- 
cepted. A beautiful new church, dedicated 



10 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



on September 15, 1898, was presented to the 
society by George A. and Eben S. Draper, in 
memory of their parents, George and Hannah 
T. Draper. 

George Draper was happily possessed of 
both inventive skill and excellent business 
abilities, a rare combination, together with 
the spirit of enterprise and the quality of 
persistence. Purchasing the water-power at 
Hopedale, he entered upon a long and success- 
ful business career. He was president of 
several extensive manufacturing firms, among 
them that of George Draper & Sons, manu- 
facturers of various improvements in cotton 
and woollen machinery; the Hopedale Ma- 
chine Company, manufacturers of patent warp- 
ers, twisters, spoolers, etc. ; the Dutcher 
Temple Company, sole manufacturers of 
Dutcher's patent temples, etc. Many of the 
improvements in the line of machinery were 
of his own invention. He was interested in 
the Shaw Knitting Company, of Lowell; and 
he was president of the Milford, Franklin & 
Providence Railroad and of the Milford & 
Hopkinton Railroad. In politics he was a 
strong Republican, deeply interested in public 
affairs. He was the founder and the first 
president of the Home Market Club. He 
gave generously of his wealth to public and 
private charities. 

He married March 6, 1839, Miss Hannah 
Thwing, daughter of Benjamin and Anna 
(Mowry) Thwing. She died in 1884, and 
he married in 1886 Mrs. Blunt, of Milford. 
Five children, all born of the first marriage, 
are now living, namely: William Franklin, 
the special subject of this biography; Frances 
E. , wife of Charles H. Colburn, of Milford, 
now deceased; Hannah T., wife of Edward 
Louis Osgood, of Hopedale; George Albert 
and Eben Sumner, both of Hopedale. 

William Franklin Draper in his youth ob- 
tained an education fitting him for Harvard 
College, and made further preparation for the 
activities of life by various periods of labor in 
the machine shop and cotton-mill, the three 
years directly before the breaking out of the 
Civil War being devoted to study of the man- 
ufacture of cotton machinery, with valuable 
practice as a draughtsman. On September 9, 



1 861, he enlisted in the local volunteer com- 
pany that his father was instrumental in rais- 
ing. This became Company B of the Twenty- 
fifth Massachusetts Infantry, and in October 
he was commissioned Second Lieutenant. 
Three years of campaigning followed. As 
signal officer on the staff of General Burnside 
he went through the battles of Roanoke 
Island, Newbern, and Fort Macon. In 
April, 1862, he was promoted to the rank of 
First Lieutenant, and thereupon rejoined his 
regiment. In August, 1862, shortly after the 
battle of South Mountain, he was commis- 
sioned Captain in the Thirty-sixth Regiment. 
With this regiment he went through the rest 
of the Antietam campaign, and after the battle 
of Fredericksburg was sent to Newport News. 
Seven months were spent in Kentucky in pur- 
suing Morgan's cavalry and sundry guerilla 
troops. He then went, in June, 1863, to join 
Grant's army at Vicksburg. He was present 
at the fall of that city, and later was in some 
hard fighting in the vicinity of Jackson. 
From June to September, 1863, his regiment 
was reduced in numbers from six hundred and 
fifty to one hundred and ninety-eight men. 
He was now promoted to the rank of Major. 
Returning from Kentucky in August, 1863, 
he marched through Cumberland Gap into 
East Tennessee, where he remained through 
the winter, taking part in the siege of Knox- 
ville and the battles of Blue Springs, Camp- 
bell's Station, and Strawberry Plains. Colo- 
nel Goodell having been wounded, subsequent 
to the 10th of October Major Draper was in 
command of the regiment. In the battle of 
the Wilderness, on the 6th of May, he was 
shot through the body while leading his regi- 
ment, a rifle-pit just being captured by his 
men. He was left on the field as hopelessly 
wounded, and was captured by the rebels, but 
was subsequently retaken and sent to the hos- 
pital at Washington. From this date onward 
he was Lieutenant Colonel. Upon recovery 
he rejoined the army, and was present at the 
siege of Petersburg and at the Weldon Rail- 
road engagement, where he commanded a bri- 
gade. A month later, at Poplar Grove Church 
and Pegram's Farm, his division was severely 
engaged, and was cut off from the others. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



His regiment, however, was the only one in 
the brigade that came out as an organization, 
and they brought back the colors of several 
other regiments. Having been again wounded 
in the shoulder by a nearly spent ball, and his 
wounds proving very troublesome, he accepted 
a discharge on October 12, 1864. He was 
brevetted Colonel and Brigadier-general, 
United States Volunteers, for gallant and 
meritorious services in the field. 

Both of his commands during the war were 
fighting regiments, the Twenty-fifth losing 
seventy per cent, of its number in one engage- 
ment (Cold Harbor), a record broken but by 
three others in the whole army; while the 
Thirty-sixth, in the campaign beginning with 
the Wilderness, had every field and line officer, 
except one, killed or wounded, and three- 
quarters of its enlisted men. 

Returning to business life, General Draper 
entered the employ of the firm of E. D. & G. 
Draper, manufacturers of cotton machinery. 
In April, 1868, he purchased the interest of 
Mr. E. D. Draper in the business, and en- 
tered into partnership with his father, the firm 
name being George Draper & Son. General 
Draper's reputation as a business man has 
steadily increased, and since his father's 
death the firm has become widely known as 
the leading introducers in this country of cot- 
ton machinery improvements. Besides man- 
aging his own large transactions, he has been 
directly connected with many other large man- 
ufacturing concerns. He is now president and 
director in more than twenty corporations 
covering the manufacture of machinery, cotton 
cloth, shoes, and electrical goods, and gas, 
water, and insurance companies. He has 
strong inventive talent, and has personally 
patented over fifty inventions. He is known 
as the first expert in the country on spinning 
machinery, and he has written standard arti- 
cles on this and other mechanical subjects. 

General Draper held no elective office ex- 
cept that of Town School Committee until his 
election to Congress. He was a member of 
Governor Long's staff during the three years 
of his official term, was a delegate to the con- 
vention that nominated President Hayes, and 
an elector at large who voted for President 



Harrison. In 1888 he was a candidate for the 
Republican nomination for Governor, being 
strongly backed by the soldier vote, but was 
defeated by Governor Ames. In 1892, when 
General Draper was nominated for Congress 
in the Eleventh District, his campaign against 
George Fred Williams was one of the most 
brilliantly successful ever made in Massachu- 
setts. He was on the stump nearly every 
night, and his speeches won favor for himself 
and his party wherever he went, although he 
made no pretensions to oratory. While a 
member of Congress he was instrumental in 
pressing through the House the bill to revise 
patent laws and the bill to protect the copy- 
right on theatrical and operatic productions. 
During both terms he was a member of the 
Foreign Affairs Committee and chairman of 
the Patent Committee. He is known as a 
hard student and practical thinker on eco- 
nomic subjects. The protective tariff has 
been his special line of research, and he has 
personally investigated at great length eco- 
nomic conditions, both in Europe and in this 
country. His pamphlets and magazine arti- 
cles on the tariff question have been widely 
read and discussed. He succeeded his father 
as president of the Home Market Club, 
which is the strongest and most influential 
protective organization in New England, rank- 
ing nationally with the American Protective 
Tariff League. He is also a member and an 
officer of the Arkwright Club. 

Socially, General Draper is well known 
among a large circle of acquaintances, both 
at home and abroad. He is a member of 
the Loyal Legion, of the Grand Army, the 
Knights Templars, the Sons of the Revolution, 
the Society of the Colonial Wars, the Union 
and Algonquin Clubs of Boston, the Hope 
Club of Providence, and many other frater- 
nities. 

In 1862, while home on a four days' leave 
of absence from the army, he married Miss 
Lydia D. W. Joy, adopted daughter of the 
Hon. David Joy. Of this union five children 
survive the mother, who died in 1884. In 
May, 1890, General Draper married Susan 
Preston, daughter of the late General William 
Preston, of Kentucky, who was an officer in 



12 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Mexican War, a Major-general in the 
Confederate army during the Civil War, and 
United States Minister to Spain under Bu- 
chanan, also Confederate Envoy to Mexico. 
Needless to say, this union between the North 
and the South has been a happy one. 

General Draper's children are: William 
F., Jr., who resides in New York City; 
George Otis, a sketch of whom appears on 
another page; Edith; Arthur Joy, who re- 
cently earned his commission as Second 
Lieutenant in the Porto Rico campaign; and 
Clare Hill Draper, who is a student in Yale 
University. Edith is the wife of Montgomery 
Blair, an attorney in Washington, D.C., and 
son of ex-Postmaster General Blair, who 
served in Lincoln's cabinet. 




ON. FRANCIS ALFRED HAR- 
RINGTON, ex-Mayor of Worcester 
and one of the city's most influen- 
tial citizens, was born on the farm 
where he now resides, on November 17, 1846, 
son of Daniel and Clarissa (Gray) Harrington. 
The family is one of the oldest in Worcester, 
and has produced men of solid worth and in- 
tegrity. 

The first ancestor in New England of whom 
there is record was Francis Harrington, who 
was born in Watertown in 1 709, and died in 
Worcester on this farm in 1793. His son, 
Nathaniel, was born here in 1742, and died in 
1 83 1. Nathaniel's wife, whose maiden name 
was Ruth Stone, was born in 1748, and died 
in 1817. The original farm of four hundred 
acres was divided after Nathaniel's death be- 
tween his two sons, Francis and Jonathan, 
each receiving about two hundred acres. 
Francis, who was the grandfather of Francis 
Alfred Harrington, was born here in 1777, 
and died on May 3, 1841. He was married 
in 1 80 1 to Lydia Perry, daughter of Josiah 
Perry and grand-daughter of Nathan Perry, of 
Worcester, who was for twenty-three years, 
from 1783 to 1806, Deacon of the Old South 
Church. Mrs. Lydia Perry Harrington was 
born in 1778, and died in 1808. She was the 
mother of six children, the eldest of whom 
was Daniel, above named. 



Daniel Harrington was born at the home- 
stead on October 4, 1802, and died here on 
September 11, 1863, leaving a wife and eight 
children. He was a lifelong farmer and one 
of the leading business men of the town. He 
commanded a company of the State militia, 
and was familiarly known as Captain Daniel 
Harrington. Warmly interested in public 
affairs and recognized as a man of sound judg- 
ment and of unimpeachable integrity, he 
could have had almost any gift within the 
offering of his townsmen; but he was content 
to remain in private life, and, with the excep- 
tion of serving as a member of the second 
Common Council and as Alderman in 1848 
and 1849, declined to have his name used as 
candidate for public office. He was an active 
and devoted member of the Old South Church 
and one of the founders of the Union and 
Salem churches, which are now consolidated. 
Daniel Harrington built the house in which 
his son now resides in 1852 and the fine barn 
that is on the premises in 1841. He was 
married on March 27, 1828, to Clarissa Gray, 
who was born on August 23, 1809, and died 
on June 6, 1884. She was a grand-daughter 
of John Dickerman, who is said to have been 
one of the celebrated "Boston Tea party." 
Of the nine children born of this marriage 
eight grew to maturity; namely, Joseph A., 
Emily A., Charles A., Delia A., Maria A., 
Francis A., George A., and Daniel A. 
Henry M. was born on March 20, 1836, and 
died at the age of a year. Joseph Harrington 
was born on October 6, 1829, and died on 
December 4, 1875. Emily, who was born on 
October 23, 1831, and died in 1883, was mar- 
ried in 1873 to George Sumner Battelle. 
Charles, who was born on May 20, 1834, is a 
member of the firm of Garfield & Harring- 
ton, coal and ice dealers in this city and one 
of the old and solid business firms of Worces- 
ter. He has served in the Common Council. 
Delia A., who was born on March 21, 1841, 
was married in 1863 to George B. Andrews, 
a livery-keeper of Clinton. Maria A., who 
was born on September 2, 1843, is the widow 
of Edward W. Wellington, and resides in this 
city. George A., who was born on July 8, 
1849, died in 1885, unmarried. Daniel Har- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



13 



rington, born on May 8, 1851, is the successor 
of Harrington Brothers in the livery business. 
He has served two terms on the Board of 
Aldermen. 

Francis Alfred Harrington was educated in 
the public schools, and subsequently worked 
on the home farm until he was twenty-one 
years of age. He then entered the employ of 
his brother Charles, and was with him at the 
Bay State Hotel livery stable, which was 
opened in 1869. In 1871 he became a part- 
ner, and the company was known as Harring- 
ton Brothers. About five years later the 
stable was removed to Central Street, where 
it is now located, and a carriage shop was 
opened in connection with it. On the retire- 
ment of his brother Charles in May, 1882, 
Mr. Harrington took into partnership his 
brother Daniel, who in October, 1896, be- 
came full proprietor, and has since conducted 
the business with excellent success. Mr. 
Harrington now gives his attention to farming 
on the homestead acres, which are among the 
most valuable farming lands in this section of 
Massachusetts, having been for many years 
highly fertilized and carefully tilled. The 
place was formerly a dairy farm, but more 
recently the fields have been devoted to grass 
crops. 

Mr. Harrington is a prominent member of 
fraternal organizations in Worcester. He 
belongs to all the orders of Masonry; is Past 
Master of Athelstone Lodge, F. & A. M. ; 
and is Past Commander of Worcester County 
Commandery, K. T., which numbers six hun- 
dred members, and is the third or fourth 
largest in the world. He is a member of the 
Odd Fellows Society; Past Master of Strong 
Worcester Grange, which consists of over 
three hundred members; Past Master of the 
county grange and treasurer of the State 
grange; also a member of the Royal Arcanum 
and Past Patron of the Order of the Eastern 
Star. In politics he is a Republican. He 
was Alderman from Ward Three from 1887 to 
1889, being unanimously re-elected; and dur- 
ing the last year he was president of the 
board. He served on the Committee on 
Sewers when the new and improved disposal 
plan was originated, and during the third year 



of his occupancy of the Mayor's chair had the 
satisfaction of seeing the plan carried into 
effect. He was Mayor of the city in 1890, 
1891, and 1892, during which time also the 
English High School and the new building 
of the public library were constructed. Mr. 
Harrington was one of the organizers of the 
Ridgely Protective Association in 1894, and 
has been its president ever since. He is one 
of the directors of the public library. 

On November 16, 1871, Mr. Harrington 
was united in marriage with Roxana M. 
Grout, who was born in Spencer, daughter of 
Silas and Eliza (Draper) Grout. Her father, 
who was an able farmer of Spencer and an ac- 
tive and prominent citizen, was fifty years old 
when Mrs. Harrington was born to him by 
his second marriage. He died on March 11, 
1879. His two wives were sisters. Mrs. 
Harrington's mother died on October 18, 
1869, at the age of fifty-eight. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrington are the parents of 
three children — Charles Arthur, Frank C. , 
and May E. The first named of these is a 
graduate of the Polytechnic Institute, and is 
now a teacher of mathematics in the Worces- 
ter High School. Frank is now a Senior in 
the Polytechnic Institute, class of 1898. 
The only daughter, May, has received a fine 
musical training, both vocal and instrumental. 



(W*c 



EORGE E. HAYWARD, a real 
\ '•) I estate dealer of Fitchburg, was born 
in South Acton, Mass., October 29, 
1854. His father, Moses Hay ward, and his 
ancestors for several generations were natives 
of South Acton. Moses Hayward, who was 
a building contractor, and erected several 
houses for the Fitchburg Railway, represented 
Acton in the legislature for two terms, and 
was a member of the Universalist church. Of 
his five children, one son and four daughters, 
George E., the subject of this sketch, was the 
third-born. 

George E. Hayward attended the common 
schools of South Acton and Milford and the 
grammar school in Fitchburg. Having pre- 
viously served an apprenticeship to the ma- 
chinist's trade, he was given the charge of 



i4 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Munroe Brothers' machine shops when he was 
eighteen years old. Later he turned his at- 
tention to civil engineering and assisted in 
laying out the Fitchburg Reservoir. He also 
worked for the city as assistant with J. Parker 
Snow for some time. Then he resumed his 
trade, and followed it for the four ensuing 
years. In 1882 he and his mother engaged in 
the hotel business at the old Holly Tree Inn. 
After they had carried on this house for six or 
seven years, they bought the property num- 
bered 339 Main Street, added an extension 
forty feet long and three stories high, and 
there opened Hayward's Temperance Hotel in 
August, 1890. In March, 1891, Mr. Hay- 
ward sold his interest to his mother, who is 
still carrying it on. He then purchased the 
Drury House Dining-room, which he con- 
ducted until March, 1896, when he sold out. 
Since then he has been engaged in the real 
estate business. 

In December, 1890, Mr. Hay ward married 
Lila M. Russell, a daughter of Andrew and 
Mary Russell, of Townsend, Mass. He has 
one son and two daughters. In politics he 
is a Republican. A strong advocate of tem- 
perance, he vigorously opposes the granting 
of liquor licenses. He is a member of Mount 
Rollstone Lodge, No. 98, I. O. O. F. 




"ON. WILLIAM TROWBRIDGE 
FORBES, Judge of the Courts of 
Probate and Insolvency for Worces- 
ter County, was born May 24, 
1850, at the old Forbes homestead, West 
Main Street, Westboro, Mass., son of Deacon 
Ephraim Trowbridge and Catharine (White) 
Forbes. 

This family is of Scotch origin ; and the name 
Forbes, still pronounced in Scotland in two 
syllables, appears in the early town records of 
New England as Forbes, Farrabas, Farrw- 
bush, Forbus, Furbush, Furbish, Farebush, 
and otherwise. In Burke's "Heraldry" it is 
stated that the surname of Forbes was assumed 
from the lands of Forbes, County Aberdeen, 
Scotland, granted by Alexander II. (1249) to 
the progenitor of this noble family. 

The first ancestor in this country of the 



branch of the family under immediate con- 
sideration was Daniel Forbes, or, as written 
by the town clerks in New England after the 
broad Scotch pronunciation, Farrabas. From 
the best information obtainable it is probable 
that he was born at Kinellar, Scotland, about 
1620. He was, it is thought, one of the 
Scotch prisoners taken by Cromwell at the 
battle of Dunbar, September 3, 1650, eight 
thousand of whom were sent to the English 
colonies. He married, according to the Cam- 
bridge records, March 26 (or 27), 1660, Re- 
becca Perriman, supposed to have been a 
sister of Thomas Perriman, of Weymouth, and 
of Frances Perriman, who married in 1654 
Isaac Andrew, of Cambridge. Daniel Forbes 
was in the employ of Edmund Angier, to 
whom he conveyed land granted to him by the 
town of Cambridge. His wife, Rebecca, died 
May 3, 1677; and he married second, May 23, 
1679, Deborah Rediat, of Concord, born in 
1652, a daughter of John and Ann Rediat (or 
Redyate), of Sudbury. Residing successively 
in Cambridge, Concord, and Marlboro, he 
died in the last-named town in October, 1687. 
His widow subsequently married Alexander 
Stewart. He had eight children — Daniel, 
Thomas, Elizabeth, Rebecca, Samuel, John, 
Isaac, and Jonathan. 

Deacon Jonathan Forbes (or Forbush), son 
of Daniel and Deborah (Rediat) Forbes, was 
born in Marlboro, March 12, 1684, and died 
at Westboro, March 24, 1768. He was a 
prosperous man, owning large tracts of land, 
besides a good farm and saw-mill. He was 
active in town affairs, serving as Constable, 
Moderator of town meetings, and Selectman, 
and was a Deacon in the church. He mar- 
ried January 2, 1706, Mrs. Hannah Hayward 
Farrar Holloway, widow of Adam Holloway, 
of Marlboro. His children were nine in num- 
ber — ■ Mary, Dinah, Daniel, Thankful, Jona- 
than, Abigail, Patience, Phinehas, and Eli. 

Deacon Jonathan Forbes, Jr., son of Deacon 
Jonathan and Hannah Forbes, was born Feb- 
ruary 3, 171 5, in that part of Marlboro subse- 
quently incorporated as Westboro. He mar- 
ried in Westboro, November 23, 1738, Joanna 
Tainter. Their children were: John, Jona- 
than, Phinehas, Mehitable, Joanna, Joanna 




WILLIAM T. FORBES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



J 7 



(second), Sarah, and Hannah, the four last 
named of whom died young. Deacon Forbes, 
Jr., died in November, 1756. His wife sub- 
sequently married a second and later a third 
husband. 

Deacon Jonathan Forbes, third, the next in 
line of descent, was born March 1, 1746, and 
died June 5, 1805. He married July 2, 1772, 
Sarah Brigham, who was born April 18, 1751. 
Their residence was in Westboro, Mass. 
Their children were: Moses, Jonathan, Hol- 
land, Ephraim, Sarah, Elias, Nancy, and 
Achsah, all of whom attained maturity and 
married. Mrs. Sarah B. Forbes was a daugh- 
ter of Moses Brigham. At her death, Au- 
gust 20, 1827, she bequeathed a Bible to each 
of her grandchildren, forty-five in number. 

Captain Jonathan Forbes, fourth, otherwise 
called Deacon, son of Jonathan, third, and 
Sarah (Brigham) Forbes, was born December 
6, 1775, at the Forbes homestead, West Main 
Street, in Westboro, Mass., where he always 
resided, and where he died January 5, 1861. 
He taught school when a young man. He 
was a Captain of militia as early as 18 13, and 
in that year he was also elected Deacon of the 
Evangelical church, holding the latter office 
forty-eight years. He held most of the town 
offices, and was a natural leader in church and 
town affairs. It is said that he was always 
chairman (de facto) of every committee on 
which he served. He married January 17, 
1802, Esther, daughter of Ebenezer and 
Esther Chamber] in, a niece of Judge Edmund 
Trowbridge. The following is a brief record 
of their children : Sarah Brigham, born April 
16, 1803, married the Rev. Charles Forbush, 
of Upton, Mass., and died August 22, 1851, 
her husband having died in 1838, five years 
after their marriage; Julia Miranda, born 
June 25, 1804, married the Rev. John Wilde, 
who died in Alexandria, Va. , in 186S; Jona- 
than, born November 26, 1806, died January 

24, 1820; Daniel H., born September 13, 
1809, married Jane Jemima Baker and, sec- 
ond, Mary Avery White; Esther Louise, born 
June 22, 1810, died October 3, 1812; Moses, 
born September 25, 1812, married Eliza L. 
Southwick; Ephraim Trowbridge, born March 

25, 181 5, married Catharine White; Eliza 



Sophia, born January 7, 1821, died un- 
married August 14, 1 88 1. 

Deacon Ephraim Trowbridge Forbes, the 
father of the subject of this sketch, received 
his education in the common schools and at 
Andover Academy. He taught school in 
Westboro and Southboro, and for many years 
was a member of the School Committee. He 
was active in church work, and was a Deacon 
of the Evangelical church. In 1842 he mar- 
ried Catharine White, born July 25, 181 5, 
daughter of William and Nancy (Avery) 
White, of Westboro, formerly of Roxbury, 
Mass., and great-great -grand-daughter of Cap- 
tain Samuel Adams, father of Governor Sam- 
uel Adams. 

After marriage Deacon Ephraim T. Forbes 
resided on the farm formerly owned by his 
father and grandfather at the juncture of West 
Main Street and the road to North Grafton. 
His death occurred August 2, 1863. His 
children were: Catherine Salome, who was 
born September 12, 1845, married March 12, 
1867, Charles Brigham Kittredge, and resides 
at Glyndon, Minn. ; Esther Louise, born June 
17, 1847, who resides in Westboro, and is un- 
married; William Trowbridge, whose name 
appears at the head of this sketch, and whose 
history follows; Francis White, born May 1, 
1852, who married first Jane A. Nason and 
second Fannie E. Hooker; and Susan Eliza, 
born September 20, 1854, who died December 
30, i860. 

William Trowbridge Forbes, the date of 
whose nativity has been already given, fitted 
for college in local schools, the Allen Classi- 
cal School at West Newton, Mass., and under 
the instruction of the Rev. James Tufts, of 
Monson, Mass. At Amherst College, where 
he was graduated in 1871, he received first 
prize in mathematics, Sophomore year, and a 
German scholarship, Junior year. He was 
class historian, one of the editors of the 
Amherst Student, and a member of his class 
crew in the regatta of 1870 on the Connecti- 
cut River. On leaving college he went to 
Constantinople, Turkey, and for three years 
was instructor in mathematics in Robert Col- 
lege. While there he made a geological sur- 
vey of the vicinity of Constantinople with Dr. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



George Washburn, the president of the col- 
lege, collecting about two thousand fossils, 
many of them being new varieties, of which 
casts were exhibited at the Vienna Expo- 
sition. 

On his return to America he studied law at 
Worcester with Bacon, Hopkins & Bacon, and 
for three years was Standing Justice of the 
First District Court of Eastern Worcester. 
He resigned this position in 1879, and prac- 
tised law in Westboro, Mass., until he was 
appointed in 1888 Judge of the Courts of Pro- 
bate and Insolvency for Worcester County. 
This position he now fills. He has held 
many of the town offices in his native place. 
He represented his district in the State legis- 
lature in 1881-82 and in the Senate in 1886- 
87. He served on the Committees on Liq- 
uor Law (being House chairman) and on the 
Judiciary, Probate and Insolvency, Election 
Laws, etc. In 1887 he prepared and carried 
through the legislature laws abolishing taxa- 
tion for church purposes, and providing for 
the incorporation of churches without a parish 
or religious society. He has taken much in- 
terest in local history, preparing a sketch of 
the history of Westboro for a county history, 
and assisting in the work on the town history 
published in 1891. He is a member of the 
American Antiquarian Society, and has been 
president of the Worcester Congregational 
Club. 

On February 5, 1884, he married, in 
Worcester, Harriette Merrifield, daughter of 
William T. and Maria C. (Brigham) Merri- 
field, of Worcester, Mass. Judge Forbes and 
his wife are the parents of six children, 
namely: William Trowbridge Merrifield, born 
April 23, 1885; Allan White, born June- 20, 
1886; Cornelia Brigham, born July 14, 1888; 
Katharine Maria, born September 23, 1889; 
Esther Louise, born June 28, 1891; and Mal- 
colm Stuart, who was born November 22, 
1892, and died February 4, 1893. 




ALTER HARRIS HOWE, for- 
merly a well-known and highly re- 
spected resident of North Brook- 
field, was born in New Hampshire, May 5, 



1827. His parents, Timothy and Lucretia 
(Whiton) Howe, removed to Underhill, Vt., 
when he was a very young boy. Later his 
father went to Melrose, and died there in his 
ninety-second year. Young Howe grew up in 
Underhill, remaining there until his twenty- 
first year. His early education was obtained 
in the common schools of that period. After- 
ward, becoming fond of books, he was con- 
sidered unusually well informed on all the 
leading topics of public interest. In 1848 he 
came to North Brookfield, and entered the 
employ of the Batcheller boot and shoe manu- 
facturing concern. Here his diligence and 
natural capabilities attracted the attention of 
his employers, and in course of time he was 
promoted until he became foreman of the sole 
leather department. In this position he often 
had charge of a large force of men, with 
whom he was very popular. He seemed able 
to obtain the best work his men were capable 
of and at the same time to win and retain 
their good will. Politically, he was a Repub- 
lican. His wide range of reading awakened 
his interest in public affairs, and he was one 
of the most progressive and public-spirited 
men in the town. He had much natural abil- 
ity as a musician, like his father, and was for 
many years a member of the choir in the First 
Congregational Church, of which, also, he was 
a communicant. His death occurred on 
April 25, 1884. 

On November 26, 1851, Mr. Howe was 
married to Rebecca B. Whiting. Her par- 
ents, Lewis and Roxana (Parks) Whiting, 
were natives respectively of Hingham and 
Lincoln, Mass. Mr. Whiting resided for 
some years in North Brookfield, was identified 
with boot and shoe interests, and carried on 
some farming. His other surviving children 
are: Phoebe W., who is the widow of the late 
Henry Deland, of North Brookfield; and 
Mary F. , who is the wife of Thomas H. Reed, 
of Worcester. Mrs. Howe resides at the 
Howe homestead. She is a member of the 
First Congregational Church, and has been 
active in the social affairs of the town. Be- 
fore her marriage she was a school teacher, 
and she taught for four years in this town and 
for about five months on Cape Cod. She was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



J 9 



the mother of two children, both of whom 
grew to maturity, but are now deceased. 
They were: Carrie M., who was the wife of 
L. H. Tucker, and resided in North Brook- 
field; and Marion T., who was the wife of 
H. G. King, and was also a resident of the 
town. 






BNER SMITH, a venerable and re- 
spected resident of Spencer, Mass., 
was born March 27, 18 16, in Mar- 
low, N.H. A son of John and 
Mary Smith, both natives of New Hampshire, 
he comes of English origin. His paternal 
grandfather, also named Abner, who was born 
and reared in Lyme, Conn., was a Revolu- 
tionary soldier. 

Until he . was about ten years of age, the 
present Abner Smith remained in the town 
where he was born. Then, in the spring of 
the year, he went to Sutton, Vt. ; and in the 
following fall his parents became residents 
there. Returning to Marlow two years after, 
he made his home with his grandfather for 
the ensuing three years. At the end of that 
time he went back to Sutton, and spent the 
remainder of his minority there. A remark- 
able incident of his life during that period 
was the driving by him of fourteen head of 
cattle from Sutton to Leominster, N.H., a 
distance of one hundred and fifteen miles, in 
four days. At that time, when roads were 
poor and travelling was difficult, this was con- 
sidered quite a feat. Shortly after reaching 
his majority Mr. Smith made a brief visit to 
Charlestown, N.H. About the year 1840 he 
came to Massachusetts, and was for a while in 
the employ of William Stevens, who kept a 
hotel at East Brookfield. As at that time 
not less than fourteen stages stopped at 
Brookfield every day, he saw a great many 
people, and picked up a large amount of inter- 
esting information. For a short time after 
his marriage he resided in Marlow, N.H. 
Returning eventually to East Brookfield, he 
engaged in teaming there. Since 185 1 he has 
resided in Spencer, and for many years of that 
period he has followed agriculture. When a 
younger man he used to purchase horses, 



cattle, hogs, and sheep in Canada, and sell 
them, generally at auction, in Spencer. He 
now owns about four hundred acres of land, on 
which he is engaged in general farming. 

Mr. Smith has held some of the minor town 
offices, and is well known and well liked 
among his townsmen. A self-made man, the 
credit of his success in life is entirely his 
own. In 1 84 1 he married Adeline Stevens, 
who died on June 30, 1890. She was a de- 
voted member of the Baptist church. Of her 
five children, William is deceased. The 
others are: Frank A., Rosetta, Lucy A., 
and Emma L. Rosetta is the wife of Her- 
bert Lovejoy, a prominent manufacturer of 
women's clothing in Boston. Lucy A. is 
the wife of Eugene Carpenter. Emma L. is 
the wife of W. Draper, of Boston. 




ILAS A. GREENWOOD, who 
conducts a flourishing insurance 
business in Winchendon, was born 
in Hubbardston, Mass., December 
6, 1854, son of Alson J. and Martha G. 
(Moulton) Greenwood. His great-grand- 
father, Abijah Greenwood, about the year 
1770, accompanied by his brothers, Moses 
and Levi, went from Holden to Hubbardston, 
and spent the rest of his life upon a farm in 
that town. Abijah joined the American army 
at the beginning of the Revolutionary War, 
and participated in the battle of Bunker Hill. 
He died January 9, 18 14. By his first wife, 
whose maiden name was Rhoda Pond, and who 
died July 16, 1782, he became the father of 
three children. On October 3, 1783, he mar- 
ried Elizabeth Marean, who bore him two 
children, and died February 15, 18 14. 

Silas Greenwood, the youngest child of 
Abijah and the grandfather of Silas A., born 
in Hubbardston, November 19, 1786, was a 
prosperous farmer throughout the active period 
of his life, and highly esteemed as a public- 
spirited citizen. In politics he was a Whig, 
and he held several town offices. On Decem- 
ber 8, 181 1, he married Julia Daniels, who 
made him the father of four sons and four 
daughters. Of these, Silas Newell, Julia, 
Hannah, Abbie D., and Alson J. are living. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Silas N. successively married Calista Heald 
and Susan Browning. His daughter, Eva, 
born of his second marriage, became the wife 
of Walter White and the mother of four chil- 
dren. Julia is the widow of the late Joseph 
Cheney Murdock, and has five children — - 
Lorey L., Alfred C, John G., William C, 
and Abbie L. Hannah is the wife of John 
G. Allen, and has two children — Abbie and 
Harry. Abbie D. Greenwood married the 
late John Browning, and has one son, Henry 
H. Browning. Grandfather Greenwood died 
March 12, 1857, and his wife on January 9, 
1864. The latter was a member of the Uni- 
tarian church. 

Alson J. Greenwood, the youngest of his 
parents' children, was born in Hubbardston, 
September 27, 1829. Succeeding to the 
ownership of the homestead, he has since fol- 
lowed general farming there successfully. 
He has also carried on lumbering. In poli- 
tics he acts with the Democratic party. For 
twelve consecutive years he was a member of 
the Board of Selectmen, and he has also 
served as an Assessor. His wife, Martha, 
born in Hubbardston, July 9, 1833, is a 
daughter of Sewall and Polly (Hunting) 
Moulton. She became the mother of five 
children, as follows: Sewall Elliott, on Sep- 
tember 15, 1853; Silas A., the subject of this 
sketch; Arthur D., May 23, 1858; Grace, 
February 3, 1862; and Harrison, August 31, 
1863. Sewall Elliott married Charlotte 
Smith, of Grafton, Mass., and has three chil- 
dren — Lucius, Arthur, and Dorothy. Arthur 
D. married Susie E. Kelton, of Hubbards- 
ton, and has one son, Ashton H, Grace is 
the wife of Ernest A. Woodward, of Hub- 
bardston, and the mother of Harold, Sher- 
man, Helen, Lyman, Alson, and Ernest 
Woodward, Jr. Harrison married Alice E. 
Priest, of Gardner, and has two children — 
Howard P. and Grace. Alson J. Greenwood 
and his wife are still residing at the home- 
stead in Hubbardston. 

Silas A. Greenwood was educated in the 
common schools and in the Wesleyan Acad- 
emy at Wilbraham, Mass. Afterward for five 
summer seasons he was employed at the 
Prospect Hotel in Princeton, for one year as 



clerk in the grocery store of Charles Davis in 
Hubbardston, and for two years he was in a 
dry-goods store at East Boston. In 1876 he 
entered the fire insurance business as a solic- 
itor in Hubbardston. Coming to Winchendon 
in the following year, he established an 
agency which has steadily grown in impor- 
tance since. He is now transacting an exten- 
sive business throughout this section. Some 
time ago he and his brother Harrison opened 
a ranch agency in Gardner. He has been the 
treasurer of the Winchendon Co-operative 
Bank since its establishment, a director of 
the Westminster National Bank of Gardner, 
and a leading spirit in all movements for de- 
veloping the business of the town. 

On November 25, 1879, Mr. Greenwood 
married Sibyl H. Browning, a daughter of 
James and Ann W. (Whittemore) Browning, 
of Hubbardston. Mrs. Greenwood is the 
mother of one son, Robert B., who was born 
in Winchendon, May 23, 1884. Mr. Green- 
wood is an Odd Fellow, and has been an ac- 
tive member of the local lodge for the past 
fifteen years. Both he and Mrs. Greenwood 
are members of the Unitarian church. In 
politics he is a Republican. 



Tt^VOBERT B. WHEELER, who owns 
I ^y' and cultivates one of the most produc- 
|b\ tive farms in Berlin, son of Amos 
^""^ and Lydia (Randall) Wheeler, was 
born where he now resides, March 19, 1835. 
He is descended from early settlers of the 
town. His grandfather, Peregrine Wheeler, 
was a lifelong resident of South Berlin. The 
father, who was also born here, after conduct- 
ing a farm in the place for some time, sold 
that property, and bought the farm where his 
son now lives, and occupied it for the last 
twenty-five years of his life. He died at the 
age of seventy-six. He was elected to sundry 
town offices, including those of Assessor and 
Surveyor of Wood. Lydia, his wife, who 
was a daughter of Reuben Randall, a prosper- 
ous farmer of Richmond, N. H., became the 
mother of eleven children, of whom seven 
sons and two daughters grew up. Three sons 
are still living — Rufus, Oliver S., and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



21 



Robert B. The mother died at the age of 
forty-seven years. Both parents were 
Quakers. 

Robert B. Wheeler completed his education 
at the Friends' School in Bolton. Since his 
youth he has been engaged in cultivating the 
home farm, having succeeded to its ownership 
after his father's death. He has devoted his 
attention to general farming and the raising 
of vegetables for the Clinton market. In pol- 
itics he is a Republican, and he has been a 
Selectman for nearly twenty years. He has 
also served upon the Board of Health ; was 
Assessor, Overseer of the Poor, and Road 
Commissioner; and has been Cattle Inspector 
since that office was created. Taking much 
interest in agricultural questions, he has been 
the treasurer of the local grange for two years. 
The family attend the Friends' Meeting. 

In 1861 Mr. Wheeler first married Nancy 
M., daughter of Thomas W. Wheeler, of Bol- 
ton. She died in 1890, aged forty-eight 
years. His present wife, in maidenhood 
Marion Jeffrey, is a native of Scotland. Of 
his six children by his first wife, five are liv- 
ing, namely: Alice, who married farmer 
George H. Dow, and has two children — 
Sarah and Ruth; Gilbert H., a farmer in Bol- 
ton, who married Ida Burnham, and has two 
children — Leon R. and Bernice; Bertha M., 
who married Walter Cole, also a farmer of 
Bolton, and has two children — -Raymond and 
Mabel; Laura A., who married John Taylor, 
a railroad employee, and has two children — 
Harold and Robert; and Amos C. Wheeler. 



(eTVLEXANDER G.WILLIAMS, propri- 
L±k etor of a large department store in 
yj|\ Barre, Mass., was born in this 

— ' town, February 28, 1849, son of 
Elbridge and Harriet (Randall) Williams. 
His father was a native of Dana, this county. 
For some years he was engaged as a hatter 
and merchant in company with Mr. Oakes in 
Athol, Mass. Removing to Barre in 1849, he 
died here in 1852. He was a man of unusual 
energy and industry, and his untimely death 
was the cause of general regret. His wife 
was a native of Petersham, Mass. They were 



the parents of seven children, three of whom 
grew to maturity, and two are living, namely: 
Mrs. Jane Brown, of Williamsville; and Alex- 
ander G. , the subject of this sketch. After 
the death of Mr. Williams, Mrs. • Williams 
was again married, and, surviving her second 
husband, died in widowhood. 

Alexander G. Williams had limited oppor- 
tunities for attending school, as he was 
obliged to begin work at an early age in 
order to contribute toward his mother's sup- 
port. When sixteen years old he was able 
to manage a farm, and by his labor he paid up 
about two thousand dollars of debts left by 
his deceased step-father. At the age of 
twenty-one he engaged in the clothing busi- 
ness where John Bartholomew now is. Later 
removing to Williamsville, he there continued 
in trade until meeting with reverses; and 
about the year 1873 he entered the employ of 
Harding P. Woods, a merchant in Barre, as 
a clerk. When Mr. Woods retired, Mr. 
Williams succeeded to the business in com- 
pany with M. J. Hillman, a fellow-clerk, 
with whom he was associated until Mr. Hill- 
man's death in 1886. 

Mr. Williams purchased the land and build- 
ing of the Woods heirs, and has since con- 
ducted the business alone. When, in No- 
vember, 1892, the old store was burned with 
a large portion of its contents, entailing a 
heavy loss only partly covered by insurance, 
Mr. Williams, alert and stirring, a man of ex- 
cellent executive ability, embraced the op- 
portunity for a new enterprise, the establish- 
ment of a large department store. For this 
purpose he erected the Williams Building, 
which was completed in 1893, is a model of 
its kind for convenience, and is an ornament 
to the town. It is entirely finished in natural 
woods, and is neat and tasteful. The base- 
ment has a cemented floor, and is divided into 
compartments for the storage of the several 
lines of goods; for instance, there is a room 
where nothing but kerosene oil is kept. A 
tank holding some thirty barrels occupies one 
side of the room, and faucets are conveniently 
arranged for drawing the oil. There is also a 
room for the storage of full barrels. Another 
room is devoted to paint oils, another to fruit, 



22 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



another to vegetables, while the centre is 
used for flour and various groceries. In a 
room directly under the street entrance to the 
store are located two large boilers, which 
supply steam and hot air for heating the en- 
tire building. The cellar extends under the 
piazza, and this part is used for the storage of 
coal, which can be conveniently delivered 
from the street above. Every department of 
trade is represented by full lines of goods of 
the best quality, affording the public facili- 
ties for shopping never before enjoyed at 
home; and the liberal policy that has charac- 
terized the establishment from the first has, 
as was anticipated by the far-sighted proprie- 
tor, succeeded in winning appreciation and 
patronage. 

Mr. Williams married Carrie R. Felton, 
who was born in Hubbardston, Mass., daugh- 
ter of Nathan H. Felton. Two sons — Ed- 
ward F. and Robert G. Williams — are the 
fruit of this union. Mr. and Mrs. Williams 
are members of the Congregational church. 

In politics Mr. Williams is a Republican. 
He has frequently been solicited to accept 
office by his fellow-townsmen, who would 
gladly avail themselves of his well-known 
business ability for the public service. 
While prevented by business pressure from 
acceding to their wishes, he takes a deep in- 
terest in the prosperity of the town, and is 
always ready to aid movements calculated to 
promote the general welfare. 



DWIN BAYARD HARVEY, M.D., 
one of the leading and best known 
physicians in Worcester County, has 
resided in Westboro during the entire period 
of his professional career. Born in Deerfield, 
N.H., in 1834, he is a son of Ebenezer and 
Rozella (Winslow) Harvey. His early educa- 
tion was acquired in the public schools, the 
Military Institute in Pembroke, N.H., and 
the New Hampshire Conference Seminary at 
Northfiekl, N.H. Subsequently he entered 
the Wesleyan University at Middletown, 
Conn., from which institution he was gradu- 
ated with honor in 1859. The year follow- 
ing he taught in the academy at Poultney, 



Vt., and then became principal of Macedon 
Academy in Wayne County, New York. He 
resigned the latter position after two years of 
successful administration to accept the pro- 
fessorship of natural science in the Wesleyan 
Academy at Wilbraham, Mass. He matricu- 
lated in the medical department of Harvard 
University in 1864, and received the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in 1866, and immedi- 
ately after located in Westboro. In 1872, 
with a view to further advancing his profes- 
sional knowledge, he visited Europe, and 
studied for nearly a year in the universities at 
Leipzig and Vienna. He is widely and fav- 
orably known as a general practitioner and a 
skilful surgeon, and is frequently called for 
consultation in critical cases by his profes- 
sional brethren in the surrounding towns. He 
has been a councillor of the Massachusetts 
Medical Society for twenty-five years, also its 
anniversary chairman; and in June, 1898, he 
was elected president of the society. Of the 
Worcester branch of the society he has served 
as president, censor, and orator. 

In local affairs Dr. Harvey has been most 
active and influential, especially in educa- 
tional matters. From 1868 to 1890 he was 
constantly a member of the School Board, and 
during several years he was school superin- 
tendent. Under his guidance the schools 
were brought to their present high standard of 
efficiency. The high school was remodelled, 
and a curriculum was established that enabled 
the pupils to complete a preparation for col- 
lege or to enter upon the work of teaching. 
For many years he has been chairman of the 
board of trustees of the public library, a trus- 
tee of the Westboro Savings Bank, and a mem- 
ber of the Board of Health. Being a thorough 
parliamentarian, he has been the unanimous 
choice of the town as the presiding officer at 
all its meetings for a decade of years. 

During his busy professional life Dr. Har- 
vey has found time and opportunity to interest 
himself in State affairs. Governor Washburn 
in 1873 appointed him trustee of the State 
Reform School at Westboro, and three years 
later he was reappointed by Governor Gaston. 
He represented his district in the House in 
1884 and 1885 and in the Senate in 1894 and 



■ ■■■■■■ . . . .. : . . " 



<t» 



^H* 





EDWIN B. HARVEY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



25 



1895, and is credited with being largely in- 
strumental in securing the passage of several 
important acts of legislation. He was the 
author and promoter of the Free Text-book 
Bill, so called, which was enacted in the face 
of persistent and combined opposition from 
school book agents and influential publishing 
houses throughout the country. The able ad- 
vocacy and successful management which se- 
cured this act of legislation, so important to 
the educational interests of the Common- 
wealth, won for him the reputation of a leading 
and most influential member of the House in 
1884. After a most exciting and closely con- 
tested campaign he was elected to the Senate 
of 1894, and re-elected the following year by 
a very flattering vote. In both years he was 
chairman of the Committee on Public Chari- 
table Institutions and a member of the Com- 
mittees on Street Railways and Public 
Health. But the legislative work by which 
he is best known and most gratefully remem- 
bered, and in which he naturally feels a par- 
donable pride, was the enactment in 1894 of 
the law regulating the practice of medicine 
and surgery. Here, too, he was opposed most 
bitterly by the united and thoroughly organ- 
ized efforts of all classes of uneducated and 
irregular practitioners and quasi-medical 
schools. But against such powerful odds he 
won, and it is said "won nobly." The law thus 
created ensures a more thorough preparation 
in the medical school for professional work, a 
higher standard in the profession itself, and 
better medical and surgical service for the 
public in general. In the closing hour of the 
senatorial session of 1895, at the request of 
Governor Greenhalge, Dr. Harvey resigned 
his senatorship to accept the position of exec- 
utive officer on the Board of Registration in 
Medicine, which was established by the regis- 
tration act. In this office his services are 
regarded by his colleagues on the board as in- 
valuable, and he is likely to hold it at will. 

Dr. Harvey is a Master Mason and a mem- 
ber of the Westboro Evangelical Church. In 
i860 he was united in marriage to Abby Kim- 
ball Tenney, daughter of Deacon Eldad and 
Sarah E. (Fellows) Tenney, of Concord, 
N.H. They have no children. 



OHN W. RAND, superintendent of the 
Fitchburg fire alarm telegraph system, 
was born in Rindge, N. H., October 9, 
1835, son of Jasper and Sarah A. 
(Pierce) Rand. His paternal grandfather was 
Ensign Ezekiel Rand, a brother of Colonel 
Daniel Rand. Ezekiel was born in Shrews- 
bury, Mass., March 24, 1747, and when a 
young man he settled in Rindge, N.H. He 
served at the battle of Bunker Hill as an 
officer of a company recruited in Rindge, with 
which he remained during the siege of Bos- 
ton; and he was an officer in Colonel Enoch 
Hale's regiment in 1778. He possessed con- 
siderable natural ability and force of charac- 
ter, and was one of the most prominent men 
of Rindge in his day. He died March 17, 
1826, and his widow died September 23, 
1833. They had four children — Ezekiel, 
Jr.; Asaph; Absalom; and Jasper, the father 
of John W. Rand. 

Jasper Rand was born in Rindge, August 
ii, 1791. He always resided at the home- 
stead, where he carried on general farming 
during his active years, and died November 
14, 1837. He was married April 10, 1833, 
to Sarah A. Pierce, a daughter of Abraham 
Pierce, of Rindge. She became the mother 
of two children: Caroline A.; and John W., 
the subject of this sketch. 

John W. Rand acquired a common-school 
education, and while still young he began 
work in a livery stable in Winchendon, Mass. 
After remaining in the employ of one concern 
fourteen years, he engaged in the same busi- 
ness in company with Eliphalet S. Woods, 
with whom he continued for over two years. 
Selling out, he came to Fitchburg, where he 
entered the employ of Shattuck & Lawrence, 
proprietors of the Rollstone Stable. Some 
time previous to the incorporation of Fitch- 
burg as a city he became associated with the 
highway department as a teamster and an at- 
tache of the town stables. On February 22, 
1875, he was appointed superintendent of the 
fire alarm telegraph system, and he has since 
been identified with the fire department. In 
connection with his other duties he acted as, 
driver of Engine No. 2 for the year 1875. 

On February 21, 1861, Mr. Rand married 



26 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Nellie L. Woods, daughter of Merrick and 
Philetta Woods, of Londonderry, Vt. She 
died December 14, 1896, aged fifty-six years. 
Mr. Rand is a member of Artisan Lodge, 
F. & A. M., of Winchendon, Mass.; and of 
the Firemen's Relief Association. He at- 
tends the Baptist church at Fitchburg. 



\pT dah 
^-*~ tive 



EORGE MANDELL, a successful 
dry farmer of Hardwick, is a na- 
ive of this town. He was born 
June 8, 1858. A son of Charles and Martha 
(Stone) Mandell, he is a representative of the 
fifth generation of his family in Worcester 
County, and, as we learn from the History of 
Hardwick, is eighth in line of descent from 
John Mandell (or Mendall), Sr., who died in 
Marshfield, Mass., before February, 1720. 

In 1749 Captain Paul Mandell, son of 
Moses and great-grandson of John Mandell, 
Sr. , settled on the farm in Hardwick which 
has since been known as the Mandell home- 
stead, and which remained in the family until 
the fall of 1895. Moses, second, born De- 
cember 16, 1 75 1, son of Paul, spent his life 
on the homestead. He was Aide-de-camp to 
Major-general Warner prior to December, 
1782, and was ever after known as Major 
Mandell. He also took a prominent part in 
town affairs, serving six years as Selectman 
between 1785 and 181 7 and as Assessor seven 
years between 1801 and 18 19. He died June 
18, 1826, in the seventy-fifth year of his age. 
On May 28, 1777, he married Mary Wheeler. 

Martin Mandell, son of Major Moses and 
Mary (Wheeler) Mandell, was born here, July 
20, 1785, and died on September 12, 1855, a 
little past seventy years of age. He was suc- 
cessfully engaged in the cultivation of the 
homestead farm, and was at one time a Cap- 
tain in the State militia. He served his town 
as Selectman. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Phila Marsh, died February 14, 1879. 

Charles Mandell was born at the old home- 
stead, January 7, 18 16. About 1840 or 1845 
he moved to the farm that his son now owns, 
and here spent the active years of his life as 
an agriculturist. He made many of the im- 
provements, and was a very practical farmer. 



In politics he was a Republican and in relig- 
ious views a Universalist. He died May 13, 
1894, and his wife died February 17, 1895. 
Mrs. Mandell was the daughter of Dr. Joseph 
Stone, of Hardwick, a native of Shrewsbury. 
Dr. Stone came here in the spring of 18 14, 
and for thirty-five years ministered relief 
to suffering humanity. His fellow-citizens 
manifested their confidence in him by elect- 
ing him to various offices of trust and honor. 
He was Deacon of the Union church, Select- 
man seven years, Town Clerk twenty years 
(from 1829 to 1848 inclusive), member of the 
School Committee eight years, delegate to the 
Constitutional Convention in 1820, Repre- 
sentative in 1823, and Senator in 1845 and 
1846. He died greatly lamented, June 27, 
1849, aged fifty -nine years. Four children, 
sons, were born to Charles and Martha (Stone) 
Mandell. Calvin died at eight years of age; 
Joseph S. Mandell is a fruit-grower in Fresno, 
Cal. , where he has a grape and raisin vine- 
yard; and Charles M. Mandell has a trucking 
business in Boston. 

George Mandell, the youngest son, received 
his education in the Hardwick schools and at 
Dean Academy, Franklin, Mass., which he 
attended a number of terms. He subse- 
quently spent two years in Boston in the em- 
ploy of his brother and a short time in 
Springfield, Mass. Returning to Hardwick, 
he took charge of the old Mandell homestead, 
which his father then owned; and later, at the 
death of his father, he came to this farm, on 
which his father died, and of which he is now 
the owner. It contains about one hundred 
and fifteen acres of good pasture and tillage 
land. Besides engaging in general farming 
he keeps a dairy of about forty cows, the milk 
from which he ships to the Boston market. 
He has about twenty-five cans per day on an 
average. 

On September 28, 1882, Mr. Mandell was 
united in marriage with Anna Howard, who 
was born in Hardwick, February 28, 1862, 
daughter of George Carey and Jane (Lawton) 
Howard. Her father was born in Hardwick, 
October 3, 1823, and died on December 22, 
1889. Her mother, who is a native of New 
Braintree, Mass., born November 14, 1832, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



27 



resides in Hardwick. Mr. and Mrs. Mandell 
have two sons, namely: Charles Howard, born 
March 20, 1884; and Robert Carey, born Feb- 
ruary 21, 1888. 

In political affiliation Mr. Mandell is a Re- 
publican. He is the present Town Auditor, 
in which capacity he has served two years. 
Fraternally, he is a member of Ware Lodge 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
of Hardwick Grange. 



Ji 



ANIEL G. HARWOOD, secretary 
and treasurer of the Barre Cheese 
Company, of Barre, Mass., was born 
in this town, February 22, 1826, 

Captain Wilcutt and Sally (Sibley) 
The family is of English origin, 



son of 

Harwood 

and its ancestors were among the early colo 

nists of Massachusetts. 

Captain Harwood's father, Daniel Harwood, 
who was born in 1736, came from Sutton to 
Barre about the year 1800, and settled upon a 
part of the Caldwell purchase in the eastern 
part of the township, where he resided for the 
rest of his life. He was rugged physically, 
and, being unusually industrious, acquired 
prosperity as a farmer. He died February 
28, 1823. In his religious belief he was a 
Baptist. On March 28, 1758, he married 
Lydia Gould. She was born in Sutton, Au- 
gust 27, 1742, and she died in 18 14. Daniel 
and Lydia (Gould) Harwood were the parents 
of ten children, namely: Daniel, born April 
7, 1759; Mary, born March 21, 1761; Peter, 
born February 23, 1763; Jesse, born Febru- 
ary 14, 1765; Simeon, born March 2, 1769; 
Lydia, born September 1, 1773; Abner, born 
January 8, 1776; Pluldah, born January 22, 
1778; Caleb, born May 13, 17S0; Wilcutt, 
born February 13, 1783. 

Wilcutt Harwood, father of Daniel G., 
came to Barre with his parents. He assisted 
them in carrying on the home farm, and cared 
for them during their last days. Succeeding 
to the ownership of the property after his 
father's death, he continued to till the soil 
for the rest of his active years. He was quite 
prominent in town affairs, serving as a Se- 
lectman and Overseer of the Poor. In poli- 



tics he was a Democrat. Sally Sibley Har- 
wood, his wife, was born in Sutton, January 

18, 1790. Her parents, Samuel and Sarah 
(Leland) Sibley, natives of Sutton, were mar- 
ried there, December 10, 177S, settling upon 
a farm in Barre. They resided here for the 
rest of their lives. Her father was born 
April 26, 1756, and died in Barre, June 30, 
1840. Her mother was born March 23, 1755, 
and died April 11, 1842. Captain and Mrs. 
Wilcutt Harwood became the parents of seven 
children, namely: Hiram S., born December 

19, 1806; George, born October 24, 1809; 
Charlotte, born November 5, 18 14; Samuel, 
born December 5, 1816; Wilcutt, Jr., born 
January 29, 18 19; Caleb, born February 25, 
1823; and Daniel G. Harwood. The living 
are: George; Wilcutt, Jr.; and Daniel G., 
the subject of this sketch — all of whom re- 
side in Barre. Charlotte was the wife of J. 
Addison Merriam. Captain Wilcutt Har- 
wood died January 15, 1S66, having survived 
his wife, who died September 27, 1859. 
They were regular attendants and liberal sup- 
porters of the Universalist church. 

Wilcutt Harwood, the younger, completed 
his education at the Barre High School, and 
was employed as a farm assistant from the 
time of his majority until he was twenty-five 
years old. After his marriage he carried on 
the home farm for eleven years, and in 1855 
he purchased a farm with the money saved 
from his earnings while working out. He 
now owns one hundred and fifty acres of ex- 
cellent land well adapted to general farming 
and dairying. As an agriculturist he has 
been successful. He is a stockholder in the 
First National Bank, was until recently 
president of the Barre Central Cheese Com- 
pany, and has for many years been a trus- 
tee of the Worcester County West Agricul- 
tural Society. He has served as a Selectman 
four years, Overseer of the Poor two years, 
and has held other town offices. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican. On March 28, 
1844, he married Abigail R. Garfield, 
born in Royalston, Mass., July 16, 1820, 
daughter of Moses and Mary (Bliss) Garfield. 
Her father was born in Warwick, Mass., De- 
cember 7, 1777, and her mother was a native 



28 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Royalston. Moses Garfield was a prosper- 
ous farmer of Royalston, where he died May 
7, 1859, his wife having died August 3, 1836,' 
aged fifty-six years. They were the parents 
of twelve children, eight of whom grew to ma- 
turity, and two are living: Abigail R., now 
Mrs. Harwood ; and Moses Garfield, Jr., of 
Royalston. Wilcutt and Abigail R. Harwood 
have two children: Julia M., born July 28, 
1850, now the wife of David D. Hilton, of 
Barre; and Emeline, born May 26, 1854, who 
married Andrew P. Garfield, of Millbury, 
Mass. Mr. Wilcutt Harwood has been con- 
nected with the Patrons of Husbandry for the 
past twenty years. He and his wife attend 
the Unitarian church. 

Daniel G. Harwood in his childhood and 
youth attended the district and high schools 
of Barre, and completed his studies with a 
one year's course at the New Salem Academy. 
He lived at the parental home until twenty- 
two years old, when he began to work out as a 
farm laborer, receiving thirteen dollars per 
month. The first year he was able to save 
one hundred and one dollars. Placing that 
amount at interest and adding to it from time 
to time, he continued to be thus employed 
until January, 1859. He then bought his 
present farm, and he began his married life 
here March 31 of the same year. His prop- 
erty, which is desirably located and consists 
of about one hundred acres, is well improved, 
and contains what is said to be the second 
frame house built in the town. He conducted 
a profitable dairy business until 1895. Since 
that year he has merely attended to the crops, 
and has devoted much of his time to outside 
affairs. He is a stockholder in the Barre Na- 
tional Bank, has been a trustee of the Worces- 
ter County West Agricultural Society for 
twenty-five years, was secretary and treasurer 
of the Barre Cheese Company from 1880 to 
1897, and is still serving in the last-named 
capacity. 

On March 31, 1859, Mr. Harwood was 
united in marriage with Louisa Austin. She 
was born in Hubbardston, Mass., October 20, 
1837, daughter of Charles and Miranda (Peck) 
Austin. Her father was a son of Alexander 
Hunting, who married Triphena Eager in 



1794, and died September 30, 1823, survived 
by his wife, who died DeHmber 23, 1839. 
Charles Austin was born in Hubbardston, 
August 16, 1809. Relinquishing the name 
of Hunting, he was known as Charles Austin, 
taking what had been his middle name for his 
surname. He followed the trades of wheel- 
wright and carpenter, also owning a farm in 
Hubbardston, where the greater part of his 
active period was spent, the last eleven years 
of his life being passed with his daughter in 
Barre. He died January 31, 1896. He mar- 
ried for his first wife Miranda Peck, who was 
born in Hubbardston, December 10, 1810, 
and died September 29, 1852. For his sec- 
ond wife he married his first wife's sister, 
Sophina Peck. She was born May 28, 1804, 
and she died March 28, 1887. He was the 
father of five children by his first union, 
namely: Triphena, born October 8, 1835, 
died July 3, 1863; Louisa, now Mrs. Har- 
wood; Almena, born March 17, 1840, now 
the wife of S. E. W. Peck, of Hardwick, 
Mass.; Elvira, born March 4, 1844, now the 
widow of Oscar C. Rice, late of Barre; and 
Harriet S., born February 20, 1847, now the 
wife of Henry W. Harwood, of this town. 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel G. Harwood have had 
one son, Austin. He was born January 22, 
1864, and' died August 12 of the same year. 

Mr. Harwood is actively interested in local 
public affairs. He has served as a Selectman 
and Overseer of the Poor, and was a member of 
the Board of Assessors eleven years. In pol- 
itics he acts with the Democratic party at na- 
tional elections. He has long been identified 
with the progress of the town, and is a mem- 
ber of the local grange, Patrons of Husbandry. 



OEL E. PROUTY, one of the founders 
of Prouty Wire Village, in the town of 
Spencer, son of Liberty and Emily 
(Bisco) Prouty, was born in Spencer, 
25, 1830. His grandfather, Eli Prouty, 
who was a soldier in the Revolution, was one 
of the early settlers of Spencer. Liberty 
Prouty, who was a native of this town, lived 
here throughout his life, acquiring consider- 
able local celebrity as a musician. He started 



July 




SAMUEL MAY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3 1 



a wire manufactory here, and, after success- 
fully conducting it for a number of years, he 
died in the fifties. His wife, Emily, was a 
native of Spencer. Of their children, Jonas 
R., Joel E., Mary E., and Heiyy W. are 
living. 

Joel E. Prouty obtained his education in 
the common schools of Spencer, supplemented 
by one term at Leicester Academy. In his 
sixteenth year he left the school-room for his 
father's wire-mill, where he worked as an em- 
ployee until he was twenty-one years of age. 
Then he became a partner in the business, 
under the firm name of L. & J. E. Prouty. 
Several years after, his brother, Jonas R. 
Prouty, was received into the firm. Subse- 
quently the father disposed of his interest, 
and the firm became J. R. & J. E. Prouty. 
A successful business was carried on until 
1S76, when the plant was sold to the Spencer 
Wire Company. Since that time Joel E. 
Prouty has been engaged in farming and the 
raising of graded cattle. 

On September 10, 1857, Mr. Prouty was 
married to Minerva J. Wilson, who was born 
in Spencer, October 24, 1837. She is a 
daughter of Horace and Martha (Draper) Wil- 
son. Her father, who was a soldier in the 
Civil War, died in the service of typhoid 
fever. Mr. and Mrs. Prouty have lost one 
son, Joel L. Their living children are: 
Eddie W., Albert B., and Ida E. Ida is the 
wife of Frederick D. Woods, of Arlington, 
Mass. In politics Mr. Prouty is a Republi- 
can. He commands the respect and confi- 
dence of all with whom he associates, and is 
always glad to help any worthy cause. 




|EV. SAMUEL MAY, of Leicester, 
veteran philanthropist and reformer, 
__ erstwhile friend and coworker with 
Garrison, Phillips, and Whittier, is 
now,, in his eighty-ninth year, one of the few 
survivors of the "Old Guard" of freedom. 
A life of broadest sympathy and of untiring 
devotion to the higher interests of humankind 
has well won the generous meed of grati- 
tude and veneration that flowers his pathway 
to the sunset land. 



Mr. May was born in Boston, Mass., April 
11, 1810, being the eldest child of Samuel 
and Mary (Goddard) May and the third of his 
name in direct line. His father, the second 
Samuel, was the youngest son of Samuel, 
first, and Abigail (Williams) May, and was 
of the sixth generation in descent from John 
May, who came from Sussex, England, with 
two sons, John and Samuel, in 1640, and set- 
tled in Roxbury, Mass. Samuel May, sec- 
ond, lived to the age of ninety-three years and 
three months, dying in 1870. He was for 
many years in business as a hardware mer- 
chant in Boston, and was interested in various 
manufactures elsewhere. He served as an 
Overseer of the Poor and as an officer of the 
Provident Institution for Savings, and he was 
one of the original proprietors of the Boston 
Athenaeum. His wife was a daughter of Jo- 
seph and Mary (Aspinwall) Goddard, of 
Brookline, and a descendant of William God- 
dard, who came from London in 1660, and 
settled at Watertown, Mass., where for some 
time he was employed as a school teacher, the 
branches taught by him including Latin. 
Seven children were born to Samuel and Mary 
May. Six grew to maturity, and four are 
now living, namely: Samuel, of Leicester; 
John Joseph, of Dorchester; Frederick W. G., 
of Dorchester; and Mary G. , wife of W. L. P. 
Boardman, of Milton. Edward Augustus, of 
especial promise, died at the age of twenty- 
one. 

Abby W. May, the youngest of the family, 
who was born in 1829, and died in Boston, 
November 30, 1 888, was a woman of noble 
character and exceptional abilities, for many 
years prominent in philanthropic, educational, 
and religious work. During the war of 
1861-65 she was secretary of the Massachu- 
setts branch of the United States Sanitary 
Commission. Later she was one of the 
founders of the New England Women's Club, 
which she long served as its secretary, and 
for many years was a member of the State 
Board of Education, to which she was first ap- 
pointed by Governor Talbot. 

The mother, Mrs. Mary May, like her hus- 
band was blessed with unusual length of days 
below, being at the age of ninety-four years 



32 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and three months when, March 17, 1882, she 
fell into the gentle sleep that knows no wak- 
ing to scenes of earth. Of this excellent 
woman wrote one who knew her well: "Un- 
compromising rectitude was the conspicuous 
trait in her character, the animating principle 
of her life the welfare of her fellow-men. . . . 
She was an avowed and working abolitionist 
in the clays when the word was a reproach and 
scoffing. She zealously maintained the prin- 
ciple of religious freedom, and with her hus- 
band joined to vindicate it in the persons of 
both John Pierpont and Theodore Parker. 
She was a consistent advocate of total absti- 
nence and a hearty believer in the principle of 
peace. She earnestly promoted the movement 
for equal legal and political rights for women. 
. . . Her domestic were as strong as her phil- 
anthropic instincts, and preserved the balance 
of her character. . . . She was sincerely relig- 
ious, though without formality, and to the last 
retained her interest in all good works." 

Having been fitted for college at the school 
of Deacon Samuel Greele and at the Boston 
Latin School, Samuel May entered Harvard 
in 1825, aged fifteen, and received his aca- 
demic degree in 1829. He was elected class 
secretary, and still holds the office. The roll 
of his class includes a long list of distin- 
guished names, among them, to mention but 
a few, Oliver Wendell Holmes, who favored 
the annual class meeting for forty years save 
one (1851-89 inclusive) with a class poem, 
such as he knew so well to write; Judge Ben- 
jamin R. Curtis, of the United States Su- 
preme Court; the Rev. S. F. Smith, author 
of "America"; the Rev. William H. Chan- 
ning; Professor Benjamin Pierce, mathema- 
tician; Chief Justice George T. Bigelow; and 
James Freeman Clarke, D.D. The class 
numbered fifty-nine. There are now living, 
besides Mr. May, Charles S. Storrow, of Bos- 
ton, and Edward L. Cunningham, of Newport, 
R.I., while "all the rest are sleeping." 

The year after leaving college Mr. May 
spent at Brooklyn, Conn., studying for the 
ministry with his cousin, the Rev. Samuel J. 
May, who, soon to become one of the first 
adherents of Mr. Garrison, and a lifelong 
abolitionist, at a later period was settled in 



Syracuse, N.Y., where for over twenty-five 
years he was very active in all educational 
and philanthropic work, as well as in the 
anti- slavery movement. Continuing his 
studies at the Harvard Divinity School, 
1830-33, Mr. May was graduated at the end 
of his course, and in August, 1834, was or- 
dained as a Unitarian, and settled as minister 
of the Second Congregational Church at 
Leicester, where he had taken up his resi- 
dence in the March previous, and where he 
has since continuously made his home, one of 
the best known, most revered, and influential 
citizens of the town. 

From a biographical sketch written by the 
Rev. Nathaniel Seaver and published in the 
Worcester Evening Gazette on the Saturday 
preceding the celebration of his eighty- 
seventh birthday, we condense the following 
account of his activities during the busy years 
following his settlement, which was of twelve 
years' duration. In 1833 he had begun to 
feel the nation's responsibility for slavery; 
and he early identified himself with the small 
and despised body known as abolitionists — 
men and women from every sect and party, 
and of pronounced views in religion, politics, 
and social philosophy, many of them thought- 
ful and devoted moral heroes who "recog- 
nized in slavery the one great curse, disgrace 
of, and menace to, American institutions, and 
spared no labor or sacrifice in denouncing and 
opposing the iniquitous legislation and party 
bargains which tended to reinforce and extend 
the evil." Party feeling was intensely bitter, 
and there was prevalent a very general opinion 
that a minister should have no decided politi- 
cal views, or, if he had, should refrain from 
their expression. On questions of justice 
and human rights it may safely be assumed 
Mr. May did not refrain from opening his 
lips. 

Being in England in 1S43, he was instru- 
mental in calling the attention, especially of 
British Unitarians, to the American anti- 
slavery movement, and in enlisting the strong 
and valuable co-operation of Dr. John B. 
Est! in and the Rev. George Armstrong. 

Resigning his pastoral charge in 1846, 
being led to this step by the inevitable logic 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



33 



of events, he thenceforward devoted himself 
to the great anti-slavery movement, as repre- 
sented by the American Anti-slavery Society. 
He became general agent of the Massachu- 
setts Anti-slavery Society in 1847; and, with 
the exception of about six months, when his 
health debarred him from working in the 
cause, he held the position, doing yeoman's 
service as a platform speaker and organizer, 
till 1865, when the mission was accomplished. 
He was president of the Worcester County 
South Division Anti-slavery Society several 
years. After the close of the war he, with 
other kindred spirits, embarked in the activi- 
ties of the Freedman's Aid Society, whose 
beneficent work, enlarged and increasingly 
honored, continues in the Hampton School, 
Virginia, the Tuskegee School, Alabama, the 
Atlanta University, Georgia, and others. 

Being fifty-one years old at the outbreak of 
the Rebellion and exempt by age and profes- 
sion from taking arms, with renewed zeal he 
wielded his pen and raised his voice on be- 
half of liberty and justice. His sons enlisted 
in the national service. 

Mr. May's interest in the church at Leices- 
ter, his former charge, and in the town affairs 
has never abated. For twenty-one years he 
served as a member of the School Board, and 
he is still a trustee of the Leicester Academy. 
For thirty-four years he was a trustee and the 
purchasing agent of the Leicester Public Li- 
brary, whose growth and usefulness he has 
always had very much at heart. In 1S75 he 
was a member of the House of Representa- 
tives in the State legislature, and served as 
chairman of the Committee on Federal Rela- 
tions, also as a member of the Committee on 
the Labor Question and of the Committee on 
Woman's Suffrage, he being a stanch friend 
of this movement as well as of the temper- 
ance reform. In politics he is a Republican, 
but with independent proclivities and advo- 
cating prohibition. He is a life member of 
the American Unitarian Association, a mem- 
ber of the Bostonian Society, and of the 
Worcester Society of Antiquity. In June, 
189S, he became the senior alumnus of the 
Harvard Divinity School. 

Mr. May was married November 11, 1835, 



by the Rev. Charles Lowell, D.D., to Miss 
Sarah Russell, daughter of Nathaniel P. Rus- 
sell, sometime treasurer of the Bunker Hill 
Monument Association and of the Massachu- 
setts General Hospital. Mrs. May was born 
January 5, 1813. She died June 13, 1895, 
after nearly sixty years of wedded life, leav- 
ing four children: Adeline; Edward, a staff 
officer in the United States navy: Joseph 
Russell, of Boston; and Elizabeth Goddard. 

The commodious and comely old mansion 
in which Mr. May has had his home for sixty 
years and more is delightfully situated on 
Leicester Hill, and commands a broad and 
picturesque view. The whole appearance of 
the house betokens welcome and hospitality; 
and here friends and neighbors, near and re- 
mote, are received with charming old-time 
grace and courtesy. Many notable visitors 
have been here entertained, as the life of Mr. 
May has been singularly rich in friendships 
with men and women of worth. It was a 
happy thought of some of the number to make 
memorable his eighty-fifth birthday by col- 
lecting and binding together in book form let- 
ters from such of the anti-slavery and other 
philanthropic workers as were then living, 
making a unique and choice volume, contain- 
ing contributions from Dr. William H. Fur- 
ness, Dr. C. A. Bartol, Governor John D. 
Long, Robert Purvis, the Garrison brothers, 
Susan B. Anthony, Mary A. Livermore, Mary 
Grew, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mrs. Jose- 
phine Butler, Dr. James Martineau, Senator 
George F. Hoar, Dr. S. F. Smith, Peter Ran- 
dolph (once a slave), Parker Pillsbury, and 
others. The four-volume biography of Will- 
iam Lloyd Garrison by his sons, W. P. and 
F. J. Garrison, is dedicated to Mr. May. 

Mr. May has now passed his eighty-eighth 
year. His mind is still vigorous, and he 
takes a keen interest in current events and the 
prominent issues of the clay. His eighty- 
seventh birthday was especially noticed by 
the religious society and Sunday-school with 
which he has been connected for more than 
sixty years. The sentiment on that occasion 
voiced by the children to whom he had been 
giving a series of lessons on the Beatitudes, 
and who brought him a gift of Easter lilies, 



34 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



may fitly close this brief biography, "Blessed 
is the man whose life is in accord with the 
Sermon on the Mount, for him shall all men 
delight to honor." 




'ERENO AUSTIN CHILDS, for 
many years a prosperous farmer and 
real estate dealer of Fitchburg, 
Worcester County, Mass., was born 
in Henniker, Hillsboro County, N.H., Sep- 
tember 17, 1820, son of Deacon Josiah and 
Abigail (Ward) Childs. His parents were 
sturdy and industrious farming people. 
Deeply interested in religious work, they 
taught their children to venerate the church 
and assist in extending its influence. Josiah 
Childs served as Deacon of the Congrega- 
tional church at Henniker for fifty years, and 
was one of the first men in the town to advo- 
cate the temperance cause. He died at the 
age of over seventy years, and his wife lived 
to be eighty-eight. They were the parents of 
eleven children, three of whom are living. 
Two of their sons, who were educated for the 
ministry, died previous to ordination. 

Sereno Austin Childs completed his educa- 
tion in an academy in his native town. About 
the year 1848 he came to Fitchburg; and, pur- 
chasing a farm in the north part of the town, 
he tilled the soil with unusual energy and 
success for some eight or nine years. He 
then turned his attention to the real estate 
and insurance business, and, establishing an 
office on Main Street, was identified with the 
development and sale of city property for the 
rest of his life. His early Christian training 
was evident in his every-day life, and charac- 
terized his business transactions, the sincerity 
and reliability of which were beyond question. 
He was a trustee for a number of years of the 
Fitchburg Savings Bank. He was an active 
member of the Rollstone Congregational 
Church and one of the first presidents of the 
Young Men's Christian Association in this 
city. Politically, he was a Republican. 

In 1849 Mr. Childs married Mary H. Lowe, 
daughter of Stephen and Susan (Kinsman) 
Lowe, both natives of Fitchburg. Mrs. Lowe 
was a daughter of Jeremiah Kinsman. She 



died at the age of forty-nine. Stephen Lowe 
was a shoemaker, and followed his trade in 
connection with farming until his death, 
which occurred when he was forty-seven years 
old. He was a zealous church member, and 
took a deep interest in the moral and religious 
welfare of the community. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephen Lowe had a family of ten children, 
four of whom are living, three in this city 
and one in California, Mrs. Childs being the 
eldest daughter. 

Sereno Austin Childs died in 1892, leaving 
a widow and an adopted son, Frederick A., 
who has removed to Leominster, and is there 
engaged in the carriage business. 



TTAHARLES F. RICE, a prosperous 
I KS business man of Brookfield, is well 

vJ?^- known as a successful grain dealer 
and lumber manufacturer. Born in 
Brookfield, Mass., September 16, 1831, he 
is a son of Columbus Rice and a grandson of 
William Rice. The latter was one of the 
early settlers of this town, who for several 
years prior to his death, at the advanced age 
of ninety-seven years, drew a pension from 
the government for his services in the Revolu- 
tionary War. Columbus Rice spent his en- 
tire life in Brookfield. One of its active and 
prominent men, he served for a number of 
years as Selectman. He was a farmer by oc- 
cupation, and engaged in the various branches 
of agriculture until his death, which occurred 
in October, 1870. By his marriage with 
Experience Turner, who was born in Salem, 
Mass., he became the father of several chil- 
dren. Of these, four survive, namely: Cas- 
sandana, the wife of William Pike, of this 
town; William E., a resident of East Brook- 
field; Charles F. , the subject of this biog- 
raphy; and Benjamin F., also of Brookfield. 

Charles F. Rice grew to maturity on the 
home farm. Having obtained his elementary 
education in School No. 4, he was afterward 
a pupil in a select subscription school for a 
while. Subsequently he taught school in the 
winters for several years, spending the rest of 
each year at the carpenter's trade. In 1855 
he established himself as a miller, having a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3S 



saw-mill and a grist-mill on Mason's Brook, 
his present location. In grain grinding, log 
sawing, and the manufacturing of lumber he 
has built up a profitable business, one of the 
largest of the kind in this vicinity. 

While a Republican in politics and true to 
the interests of his party, Mr. Rice has never 
been an aspirant to official honors. He is an 
active member of the Unitarian Congrega- 
tional church, in which he served several 
years as Deacon. He was married February 
24, 1857, to Miss Maria Walsh, a daughter of 
Michael and Ciliscia Walsh, of Warren, 
Mass. His children are: Charles A. and 
Annie G. Annie is now the wife of Claude 
H. Laflin, of Brookfield. 




NSON B. POLAND, who for the past 
thirty years has served efficiently as 
Road Commissioner of North 
Brookfield, Mass., and is now a 
member of the Board of Selectmen, was born 
in this town, September 20, 1835, a son of 
Deacon Barnet and Sarah (Foster) Poland. 
His paternal grandfather, Joseph Poland, was 
the first of the Poland family to locate in this 
section of Worcester County. 

Deacon Barnet Poland, a lifelong resident 
of North Brookfield, was the owner of a com- 
fortable homestead farm, which he managed 
successfully in connection with his trade of a 
carpenter and contractor. He was a decided 
Republican in politics and an active member 
of the First Congregational Church, in which 
he was a Deacon many years. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Sarah Foster, was a 
native of Vermont, and was there bred and 
educated. Of their children five are now 
living, as follows: Rachel, wife of Luther 
Woodis, of North Brookfield; Luther F., of 
Worcester, Mass. ; Anson B., the particular 
subject of this sketch; Abigail, wife of John 
Hibbard, of Worcester; and Phebe, who is the 
widow of the late Albert Knight and resides 
in Omaha, Neb. 

Anson B. Poland in his boyhood and youth 
obtained his education in the district schools, 
and on his father's farm acquired a practical 
knowledge of the various branches of agricult- 



ure, to which he has devoted his energies 
since attaining his majority. He has been 
actively interested in the welfare and prosper- 
ity of the town, and, in addition to serving as 
Road Commissioner for three decades, has . 
been Constable for a quarter of a century, and 
in the spring of 1897 and again in 1S98, the 
present year, was elected Selectman on the 
Republican ticket, which he uniformly sup- 
ports. Fraternally, he is a member of the 
I. O. O. F. and of the North Brookfield 
Grange, P. of H., of which he was treasurer a 
number of years. On November 24, 1857, 
Mr. Poland married Miss Hannah Maria Hill, 
daughter of Erastus Hill, of this town. They 
began their married life at the home of Mrs. 
Poland's father, where they have since resided 
continuously, the farm having come into their 
possession at the death of Mr. Hill. Mr. 
Poland has made various improvements on the 
place, and in the pursuit of general farming 
has met with success. The only child born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Poland, a son, Albert L., 
died May 10, i860, aged three and one-half 
months. Mrs. Poland is an active worker in 
the temperance cause, of which she has always 
been a warm advocate, and is a member of the 
North Brookfield W. R. C, the local grange, 
and the Daughters of Rebekah of this town. 

On the paternal side Mrs. Poland is of Eng- 
lish origin. The emigrant ancestor, John 
Hill, who was born in London, England, came 
to Massachusetts in old Colonial times, and 
settled in North Brookfield, where he died at 
the remarkable age of ninety-nine years. The 
line was continued through his son, Peter 
Hill, 2 Thomas Hill,.' Kittredge Hill," to 
Erastus Hill, father of Mrs. Poland. Erastus 
Hill was a representative citizen, active and 
influential, and rendered valuable service to 
his fellow-townsmen as Selectman and Over- 
seer of the Poor, offices which he filled many 
terms. He was a man of honest integrity, 
respected in the community, and a stanch ad- 
herent of the Democratic party. He married 
Hannah Whittier, who was born in Charles- 
town, Mass., but passed the greater part of 
her early life in West Amesbury, now Merri- 
mac, Mass. Her father, Isaac Whittier, died 
of fever in the War of 18 12. Only two of the 



36 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



children of Erasfus and Hannah W. Hill are 
now living, namely: Mrs. Poland; and Ada- 
line, wife of Frank Hamilton, of Spencer, 

Mass. 



AMES PRENDERGAST and his son, 
WILLIAM J. PRENDERGAST, are 
widely known as proprietors of the 
Mount Pleasant House in Holden, 
which is one of the leading summer hotels in 
Worcester County and is well patronized 
throughout the year. 

Mount Pleasant House is beautifully situ- 
ated in the midst of charming scenery near 
Jefferson. It has an elevation of about one 
thousand feet above the sea, and commands a 
view of the village of Jefferson, Eagle Lake, 
and a broad expanse of hills and vales. Pub- 
lic accommodations were first furnished here 
in the summer of 1S89, when ten guests were 
entertained. From this modest beginning 
the growth has been rapid and steady. Ex- 
cellent service is provided, and at any time 
during the heated season about two hundred 
guests may be found here. The roads in this 
vicinity are in good condition, and many 
beautiful spots are to be seen in driving. 

The present house has been recently built. 
It is finished in hard pine, and is equipped 
with every modern convenience for the com- 
fort of its inmates. It has spacious parlors 
and hallways, and a dining-room that will seat 
one hundred and fifty guests. Its sleeping 
apartments are light and airy, freshly fur- 
nished, and in every way attractive. The 
plumbing of the house is perfect, and the 
commodious bath-rooms are freely supplied 
with both hot and cold water. Broad ve- 
randas, three hundred and twenty-five feet in 
length, extend along the front and side, and 
furnish a delightful promenade in every kind 
of weather. Extensive grounds surround the 
house; and the lawns and avenues are shaded 
by fine large elms, some of them over a hun- 
dred years old. Here, under the cool shade, 
hammocks and swings are hung; while, on the 
carefully levelled plots adjoining, lawn 
tennis, croquet, and other games are played. 
Boating and fishing are to be had in Eagle 



Lake and at Maple Springs Reservoir. The 
house furnishes boats, also carriages and 
drivers at reasonable rates. 

A dancing pavilion, seventy-three by thirty 
feet, bowling alleys, and rooms containing 
pool and billiard tables, are attached to the 
main house; and one of the very pleasant 
weekly events during the summer is the regu- 
lar Saturday night hop. The vegetables, 
milk, and cream, daily served in the hotel 
dining-room, are of the freshest and choicest 
to be had, and are all obtained from the farm 
which is run in connection with the hotel. 
This, the owners justly feel, is one of the 
strongest attractions of their house for those 
who desire the choicest of diet. In every re- 
spect the location is healthful, and even in 
the hottest weather a cooling breeze is gen- 
erally prevalent to refresh tired nerves. The 
hotel is kept open the whole year, and during 
the winter numerous sleighing parties are en- 
tertained. For these, hot suppers are pro- 
vided, cooked and served in first-class fashion. 
Mount Pleasant House is forty-six miles from 
Boston, fifty-three from Providence, and only 
nine miles from Worcester. Sixteen pas- 
senger trains daily go through Jefferson, con- 
necting with these cities. The house is sup- 
plied with a long-distance telephone, No. 

916-5. 

The host, James Prendergast, was born in 
Kilkenny County, Ireland, on April 3, 1828, 
his parents being Patrick and Margaret Pren- 
dergast. He came to America in the spring 
of 1849, and during the same year found his 
way to Holden, and began working as assist- 
ant on a farm. For his first eight months' 
work in America his wages were thirteen dol- 
lars a month. He next secured a position in 
the tannery of Mr. W. G. Warren in Holden, 
where he worked for seven years. At the 
end of this time he had saved a small amount 
of money, and was able to buy a small farm 
of seven acres, which is in sight of his present 
home. After farming there for seven years, 
he bought the estate, comprising about a hun- 
dred and twenty-five acres, upon which the 
Mount Pleasant House is now situated. Here 
he gave his attention to general farming until 
he started the hotel business. 




CHARLES A. DEWEY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



39 



He was married in 1852 to Joanna Flem- 
ming, who was born in Ireland in 1831. 
Three children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Prendergast, namely: Thomas, who died 
at the age of thirty-two; William J.; and 
James M. Prendergast. The last named is 
now the Rev. Father Prendergast, of Mill- 
bury, this county. He was born in Holden 
on January 21, 186 1, and was educated for the 
priesthood at Holy Cross College, Worcester. 

William J. Prendergast was born in Holden 
on June 21, 1857, and received his education 
in the public schools of the town. His early 
life was devoted to agriculture; but, since his 
father started the hotel business, this son has 
devoted his energy to the work of developing 
and extending the business. Many of the 
features that make the Mount Pleasant House 
so attractive have been due to his suggestion. 
He has also been active in town affairs, and 
has served as Selectman three terms, being 
only twenty-nine years of age when first 
elected. He has also been Road Commis- 
sioner for the town, and was Postmaster dur- 
ing Mr. Cleveland's two administrations. 
He is a member of Holden Lodge, No. 201, 
A. O. U. W. ; and of the Knights of Colum- 
bus at Worcester. In politics he is a Demo- 
crat. He is unmarried. 

The elder Mr. Prendergast was formerly 
Superintendent of Roads, holding the office 
for five years. He is a member of the Cath- 
olic church at Holden, and has always been 
one of its most liberal supporters. In poli- 
tics he is a stanch Democrat. 



UDGE CHARLES A. DEWEY, of 
Milford, was born December 29, 1830, 
in Northampton, Mass., son of Judge 
Charles Augustus Dewey. His grand- 
father, Daniel Dewey, also a lawyer of note 
and for many years a Judge of the Supreme 
Court of Massachusetts, who was born and 
bred in Sheffield, Mass., afterward removed to 
Williamstown, where he was elected a mem- 
ber of Congress. Daniel married Maria 
Noble, of Williamstown. 

Charles Augustus Dewey, Sr. , was born 
March 13, 1793, in Williamstown, Mass. 



After his admission to the bar he was District 
Attorney for a time, and later he served for 
thirty years as Judge of the Massachusetts 
Supreme Court. He married Caroline Clin- 
ton, daughter of General James and Mrs. 
Mary Gray Clinton and a sister of Governor 
De Witt Clinton, of New York. General 
Clinton was an officer in both the French and 
Indian War and the war of the Revolution. 
During the latter he served in New York, and 
was in command of the central division of the 
army at the battle of Yorktown. Of the 
eight children born to Judge Dewey, Sr., and 
his wife, three are living, namely: Charles 
A., the subject of this biography; Mary Clin- 
ton, the wife of Judge H. B. Staples, of 
Worcester; and Maria Noble, who resides in 
Worcester with Mrs. Staples. Both the 
Dewey and the Clinton families are descended 
from early settlers of Massachusetts. Thomas 
Dewey, the emigrant ancestor of the former, 
was made a freeman in Dorchester, May 14, 
1634. Colonel Charles Clinton, the founder 
of the Clinton family in New England, was a 
direct descendant of William the Conqueror. 
He was born in Ireland, whence he came to 
Cape Cod very early in the seventeenth cen- 
tury, and from there removed to Orange 
County, New York. 

Charles A. Dewey was fitted for college at 
Williston Seminary, and was subsequently 
graduated from Williams College with saluta- 
tory honors in the class of 185 1. After read- 
ing law in the office of his brother, Francis 
H. Dewey, of Worcester, for a time, he took 
a year's course at the Harvard Law School. 
Thence he went to New York City, where in 
1854 he was admitted to the bar. After 
studying and practising in New York for the 
ensuing two years, he went to the West, locat- 
ing in 1856 at Davenport, la., where he re- 
mained two years. In 1859 he came to Mil- 
ford, and during the first two years of his 
residence here was associated with Hamilton 
B. Staples, afterward District Attorney and 
Judge of the Superior Court. In 1861 he was 
made Trial Justice in Milford; and in 1864, 
when the Milford police court was established, 
he was appointed its Judge. He resigned this 
office in 1872, when the Third District Court 



40 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Southern Worcester was organized, and 
Governor William B. Washburn appointed 
him Judge thereof, a position which he has 
since held. 

For twenty-five years Judge Dewey has 
been a trustee of the Milford Town Library 
and for much of the time the chairman of the 
board. Also, for seven years he has been a 
member of the Milford School Board and its 
chairman. In politics he is a stanch Repub- 
lican. He is a member of the Congregational 
church, in which he is an active and zealous 
worker. On March 12, 1867, he married 
Miss Marietta N. Thayer, a daughter of 
Alexander W. and Marietta (Dustin) Thayer. 
On the maternal side she is a descendant of 
Hannah Dustin, who in March, 1697, was car- 
ried off from her home in Haverhill, Mass., 
by the Indians, and subsequently escaped 
from captivity, returning to her family with 
the scalps of ten redskins whom she had tom- 
ahawked. Judge and Mrs. Dewey have one 
child, Maria Thayer, who, born August 8, 
1872, married Dr. Charles H. Cole, a promi- 
nent young physician of Milford. 



~fp)TERBERT H. CAPEN, a Selectman 

1—1 and a leading business man of Spen- 

Jjs I cer, son of Alfred and Maria E. 

^*— ^ (Sibley) Capen, was born in the 

adjoining town of Charlton, July 8, 1856. 

His father, a farmer by occupation, born in 

Spencer, died in Charlton in December, 1876. 

Alfred spent the last thirty years of his life in 

Charlton, where his widow still resides in her 

seventy-third year. He was a Republican in 

politics. His father, Abraham Cooper, who 

was also a farmer, was a son of James Capen, 

who was a Captain in the Continental army 

during the war of the Revolution. 

Herbert H. Capen spent the early years of 
his life in Charlton, attending the common 
schools and doing light work on the farm. 
Subsequently he attended a private school in 
Worcester for one year, and another, which 
was conducted by Professor C. C. Foster, for 
three years; and then he took a course of 
study in Howe's Commercial School, from 
which he duly graduated. Coming to Spencer 



in 1875, when about twenty years of age, he 
entered the employ of his uncle, James Capen, 
a dealer in grain. After a time he and 
Robert Forsyth bought out his uncle, and con- 
tinued the business under the name of Forsyth 
& Co. At the end of two years the firm was 
succeeded by that of James & H. H. Capen, 
which after an equal length of time was suc- 
ceeded by H. H. Capen. Mr. Capen re- 
mained the sole proprietor for several years, 
and then retired. He resumed the business 
in October, 1895, and has since built up a 
most successful trade. He carries a heavy 
and first-class stock, comprising baled hay and 
straw, oats and corn, grain of every descrip- 
tion, meal and mill feed, besides the finest 
brands of flour from the best mills in the 
country. Having a large storage capacity, he 
is constantly in a position to fill orders, either 
large or small, with promptness and at the 
lowest prices. He employs three assistants, 
and keeps two teams busy. 

Mr. Capen married Edith M. Parkhurst, of 
Charlton, who died on August 9, 1895, leav- 
ing one daughter, Ina F. He is a member of 
Goodwill Lodge, and the encampment at Spen- 
cer of the I. O. O. F. , and of the Farmers' 
and Mechanics' Association. In politics he 
is a Republican, and at the present time is 
serving on the Republican Town Committee. 
Since April, 1897, he has been a Selectman. 
During his twenty-two years of residence in 
Spencer, Mr. Capen has earned a reputation 
for fair and honorable dealing, the confidence 
of the business public, and the friendship of 
many estimable persons. 



j2)|'ENRIE H. LEACH, the proprietor 
■ ^J of Upland Dairy Farm, North Brook- 
s \ field, son of Addison and Priscilla 
(Caswell) Leach, was born in 
Wendell, Franklin County, November 15, 
1853. He comes of English stock. His 
grandfather, Artemas Leach, went to Wen- 
dell from Bridgewater, Mass. Addison 
Leach, the father, having learned the carpen- 
ter's trade, followed it in Wendell, his native 
town, until 1855, when he came to North 
Brookfield. Here for many years he has 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



4.1 



followed the business of contractor and 
builder, in which he acquired a high reputa- 
tion throughout this section. He is now in 
his seventy-fifth year. Early in the fifties he 
represented Wendell in the legislature, and 
he has served as an Assessor in North Brook- 
field. In politics he is a Republican. Pris- 
cilla, his wife, has had several children, two 
of whom are living, namely: Henrie H., the 
subject of this sketch; and Lizzie J,, the wife 
of Harrison Crawford, of Worcester, Mass. 

Henrie H. Leach received his education in 
the common schools of North Brookfield, 
finishing in the high school. For a short 
time after he was employed as a clerk in a 
shoe store in Gardner, Mass. Since 1876 he 
has resided upon the L T pland Dairy Farm, 
where he owns eighty-two acres of land, in- 
cluding tilled ground capable of producing 
large crops. He keeps an average of fifty 
head of cattle and several horses, employs two 
assistants the year around, and he has im- 
proved machinery for the manufacture of but- 
ter. It is not too much to say that he is one 
of the most successful dairymen in the town. 

Mr. Leach married Mary Peers, who was 
born in Brooklyn, N.Y. , daughter of Thomas 
Peers, late of North Brookfield. Born of the 
union were five children — Bertha, Hazel, 
Lester C, Eunice, and Roland Leach. In 
politics Mr. Leach is a Republican, with in- 
dependent proclivities; and he is highly es- 
teemed as a public-spirited citizen. He is a 
member of Woodbine Lodge, I. O. O. F., of 
this town. 




'AMUEL S. DENNIS, the chair- 
man of Hardwick's Board of Select- 
men, son of Adonijah and Julia A. 
(Collins) Dennis, was born on the 
farm where he now lives, March 12, 1833. 
His paternal great-grandfather, also named 
Samuel, who was a Baptist minister, pur- 
chased this farm in 1777 of a Mr. Sears, and 
lived here until his death. The Rev. Mr. 
Dennis's son, Adonijah (first), who was born 
in Sutton, Mass., from there went to Peters- 
ham, and later came to Hardwick, succeeding 
his father on the farm. Grandfather Dennis 



was a Revolutionary soldier, entering the 
army when eighteen years old, and partici- 
pated in the battle of Stillwater. He died 
here, September 30, 1844. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Eunice Sibley, died on Sep- 
tember 15, 1842, at the age of eighty -two. 

Adonijah Dennis (second), the father of 
Samuel S., born on this farm, October 4, 
1803, died here, March 24, 1881. His life 
was spent here, industriously occupied in 
farming. He served the town for one year 
as a member of the Board of Selectmen, and 
he also held the office of Assessor. In poli- 
tics he was a Republican, in religion a mem- 
ber of the Calvinistic church. His wife, 
Julia A. Collins before marriage, born in 
Charlestown, Mass., in 1807, died in 1858, 
aged fifty-one years. Of their ten children, 
two died in childhood: Samuel S., aged two; 
and Charles P., aged three. Five of the num- 
ber survive, namely: Samuel S., the subject of 
this biography; Ebenezer, residing in Staf- 
ford Springs, Conn. ; Lewis H., in Spencer, 
Mass.; Julius A., in Hardwick; and Frederick 
C, on Staten Island, N.Y. The others died 
after reaching maturity. They were: John 
G., a lawyer; Julia A. ; and Dahliette. 

Samuel S. Dennis grew to manhood in 
Hardwick. The education he received here 
was supplemented by a term each at the Warren 
and New Salem Academies. At first he en- 
gaged in teaching, which he followed at inter- 
vals for about eleven years. Since the end of 
that period he has given his attention prin- 
cipally to farming. In 1862 he enlisted in 
Company K, Forty-second Massachusetts 
Regiment, and was afterward in the pontoon 
service, detached. He was honorably dis- 
charged after spending eleven months in the 
Civil War. Then, returning to his native 
town, he took charge of the home farm. Hav- 
ing subsequently become the owner of the 
property, he has enlarged it by the purchase 
of adjoining land, so that there is now about 
five hundred acres. Another farm in the 
town, near the old furnace, also belongs to 
him. He conducts the home place as a dairy 
farm, keeping from thirty-seven to forty cows, 
and obtaining daily about twenty cans of 
milk, which he ships to Boston. 



4 2 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



On March 26, 1863, Mr. Dennis was united 
in marriage with Miss Julia M. Sibley, who 
was born in Hardwick, July 16, 1842, daugh- 
ter of Sardius and Mary Stone (Johnson) Sib- 
ley. Both of her parents were natives of 
Barre, Mass. Her father, having been a 
teacher in his early years, was later engaged 
in farming, and died at the age of forty-two. 
Mrs. Sibley lived to be sixty-seven. In re- 
ligion he was a Universalist and she a Con- 
gregationalist. They had six children, of 
whom three are living; namely, Betsy, Char- 
lotte E., and Julia M. The others were: 
Mary J., Leander S., and Emma L. By a 
previous marriage, which was contracted with 
Miss Betsy Johnson, he had two children — 
Huldah H. and Sardius J., both of whom are 
living. Mr. and Mrs. Dennis have two chil- 
dren, who comprise the fifth generation of the 
Dennis family that has lived on the farm. 
They are: Jennie M. Dennis, born November 
9, 1867, now a public-school teacher; and 
Samuel S. Dennis, Jr., born June 24, 1877, 
who is a student in the Vermont University at 
Burlington. Mr. Dennis has been Selectman 
of Hardwick for thirty-four consecutive years 
and the chairman of the board for all but one 
year of the period. He also served in the 
State legislature of 1866. Fraternally, he is 
a member of Samuel F. Woods Post, No. 
179, G. A. R. 




AMUEL I. RICE, a prominent cit- 
izen of Northboro, Mass., by occu- 
pation a farmer, also for a number 
of years in early manhood a suc- 
cessful schoolmaster, is the worthy represent- 
ative of a family that has been thoroughly 
identified with the history of this part of 
Worcester County for several generations. 
He was born in Northboro, September 11, 
1821, son of Benjamin Rice, and is a lineal 
descendant of Edmund Rice, who came from 
Old England to New England in 1639, and 
settled in that part of Sudbury, Mass., now 
widely known as Rice Springs. 

As we learn from the Rice Family History, 
Edmund Rice, second, son of Samuel and 
grandson of the first Edmund, married Ruth 



Parker, and was the father of twelve children. 
Seth Rice, one of his seven sons, became a 
substantial farmer of Westboro, where from 
1738 until 1798 he was Deacon of the Ortho- 
dox church. He died at the venerable age of 
ninety-one years. Two of Seth's brothers, 
Timothy and Silas, were captured by the Ind- 
ians during one of their raids upon the town, 
and, being carried to Canada, were adopted 
into the tribe. They married Indian women, 
and one became chief of the Caughanawanga 
tribe. Their posterity, it is said, still wield 
much influence in that country. It is a mat- 
ter of history, we are told, that the influence 
of the "Rice boys" was largely instrumental 
in preventing the savage tribes from sweeping 
down upon the North during the Revolution 
and co-operating with the British. 

Deacon Seth Rice, Jr., son of Deacon Seth, 
Sr. , and Dorothy (Robinson) Rice, was the 
owner of the largest homestead property in 
Westboro, the farm now known as the Sim- 
mons place. By his first wife, Rachel Cool- 
idge, who died in 1766, he had three chil- 
dren; and by his second, Sarah Brigham, he 
had seven. Samuel Rice, second, born in 
1762, eldest son of Deacon Seth, Jr., and a 
resident successively of North Westboro, of 
Grafton, and of Princeton, was also twice 
married. His first wife was Rizpah Wilson, 
and his second, Mrs. Cobb, of Princeton, 
Mass. 

Benjamin Rice, born March 30, 1787, son 
of Samuel and Rizpah, on attaining his major- 
ity bought a farm on the side of Sulphur Hill 
in Northboro, where he tilled, the soil and 
earned a living for himself and family. He 
married on May 2, 18 16, Lucy Fay, daugh- 
ter of Nahum and Lucy (Warren) Fay and 
grand-daughter of Paul and Rebecca (Rice) 
Fay. Mrs. Lucy F. Rice died in 1824, leav- 
ing three children, namely: Maria Fay, who 
became the wife of Columbus Eames, and died 
in early life, leaving one son, Warren F. ; 
Rizpah Wilson, now an active woman of 
seventy-eight years; and Samuel I. Warren 
F. Eames at the age of nineteen '•enlisted in 
the late Civil War as a soldier, and was killed 
by a rebel bullet at the battle of Ball's Bluff. 

Nahum Fay, Mr. Rice's maternal grand- 





i K 



SAMUEL I. RICE. 




BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



45 



father, was a grandson of Gershom and Mary 
(Brigham) Fay. Mary Brigham is well 
known to the student of local history as the 
heroine of the day during one of the Indian 
massacres of early Colonial times. She, in 
company with Mary Goodenow, was gathering 
herbs outside of the garrison-house that de- 
fended the town, which was located in the 
easterly part of Northboro, on what is now 
the William A. Bartlett farm. Discovering 
the Indians in ambush, the two girls hastened 
forward to alarm the slender garrison; and 
Mary Brigham succeeded in reaching the fort, 
but her companion, who was lame, was over- 
taken by the redskins and brutally murdered. 
A monument recently erected marks the spot 
on which the deed was committed. Mary 
Brigham, with true pioneer grit, busied her- 
self throughout the attack in loading guns for 
the men in the fort; and the savages were 
finally driven back. She was a daughter of 
John Brigham, who, for his services as a sur- 
veyor, was given a large tract of land in this 
town, then known as the Coram farm, includ- 
ing what is now the William's farm, Hastings 
farm, Lewis Fay farm, the Nahum Fay farm, 
the Mentzer farm, and most of the farm now 
owned by Mr. Rice. 

Samuel I. Rice received his advanced edu- 
cation in academies at Berlin and Monson, 
and at the age of nineteen years began his 
career as teacher in the public schools of 
Lancaster, in that part of the town now in- 
cluded in Clinton. The following three years 
he taught in Northboro, having charge in turn 
of the various district schools. He was later 
employed in the neighboring towns of Berlin, 
Shrewsbury, and Boylston, and for one year 
in the State of New York. 

Few of the teachers of this clay, even in re- 
mote country regions, realize what it meant to 
undertake the management of a district school 
of fifty years ago. The eighty or ninety 
pupils gathered in one small room, ranging in 
age from five years to twenty-one, equipped 
with text-books of all descriptions, the one 
teacher was expected faithfully to instruct in 
all branches of learning from the alphabet to 
algebra and philosophy. During the fifteen 
winters that Mr. Rice was thus engaged, he 



was very successful in his vocation, and, 
having proved himself an able disciplina- 
rian, he was called upon to teach schools 
in which his predecessors had been literally 
"carried out" by the pupils, a no unusual ex- 
ploit for the boys of those days. Although 
their reputation was at stake, it is safe to say 
that they never undertook to play that game 
with him, the ringleaders soon finding out 
that the stalwart young master, six feet in 
height, could easily manage them without ap- 
parent effort. 

During the greater part of his career as a 
teacher Mr. Rice was also engaged in carry- 
ing on the farm on which he now resides, and 
to whose improvement and cultivation he has 
devoted his energies with excellent results. 
When quite a young man he was elected as a 
member of the local School Committee, and 
for about twenty years he rendered the town 
valuable service in that capacity. He has 
also served as Assessor and as Selectman, 
being chairman of the latter board at the same 
time he was chairman of the School Commit- 
tee. In 1883 he represented the towns of 
Northboro, Boylston, and Shrewsbury at the 
General Court, where he was one of the House 
Committee on Elections. In his early days 
he was an anti-slavery man to the backbone 
and a prominent member of the old Liberty 
party when it cost something to espouse that 
cause, when "influential citizens" said, "No 
young hot-head holding such views shall ever 
enter a school-house as teacher of our chil- 
dren." A man of broad and liberal religious 
thought, he has been for many years an active 
member of the Second Congregational Society 
and one of its trustees. 

On May 29, 1849, Mr. Rice married Eliza 
A. Brigham, who died a few years later, leav- 
ing two children, namely: Chandler T., who 
lives on the home farm; and Samuel Wilson, 
who died suddenly of heart disease at the age 
of thirty-four years, leaving five children — ■ 
Anna Eliza, Carrie Louise, Gertrude Alice, 
Edith Mabel, and Bessie Wilson. Mr. Rice 
was married the second time, on June 18, 
1863, to Sarah Aurora Heath, of Northboro, 
who died April 7, 1873. Mr. Rice and Miss 
Julia A. Andrews, of Boylston, were married 



46 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



on April 2, 1874. They have one son, Ben- 
jamin Willard Rice. 



(S^YSHLEY W. RICE, who was formerly 
h^\ a business man of Grafton and a mem- 

/j[\ ber of the Massachusetts legislat- 
^*~^ ure, is now living in retirement. 
He was born in Wardsboro, Vt., May 27, 
1824, son of Ephraim and Betsey (Maynard) 
Rice. The paternal grandfather, also named 
Ephraim Rice, moved from Petersham, Mass., 
to Wardsboro, and died there at the age of 
ninety-three years. He was a Revolutionary 
soldier, and witnessed the surrender of Gen- 
eral Burgoyne. 

Ephraim Rice, the father, was a prosperous 
farmer and stock dealer of Wardsboro, and 
drove cattle to the Brighton market. He 
served as steward of the Methodist Episcopal 
church for fifty years, and was an earnest ad- 
vocate of temperance. At his death he was 
ninety-one years old. He married Betsey 
Maynard, who died after a wedded life of 
sixty-five years. Of her seven children, 
Seneca, who was a farmer of Wardsboro, died 
in 1S91; Truman died in Geneseo, 111., at 
the age of forty years; Charles is living in re- 
tirement in Wardsboro; Emma died in Wards- 
boro in 1880; and Jeanette B. is the wife of 
Edward Plympton, the Postmaster of Wards- 
boro. 

Ashley W. Rice was reared and educated 
in his native town. Coming to Grafton in 
1844, he was for the succeeding eleven years 
engaged in the livery business; and from 1855 
to the date of his retirement, in 1893, he car- 
ried on general farming, was an extensive 
dealer in timber land and a manufacturer of 
lumber. After relinquishing active business 
pursuits he sold his farm to his son, and, 
moving to his present comfortable residence 
at North Grafton, he is now enjoying a well- 
earned rest. 

In 1848 Mr. Rice was united in marriage 
with Caroline Barrett, of Grafton. The chil- 
dren of this union are: Lilla M., now the 
widow of Charles L. Ware, an attorney and 
United States Commissioner, who died at 
Fort Scott, Kan., in 1887; Lyman M., the 



chairman of the Grafton Board of Assessors 
and the Moderator at town meetings; and 
Earl L. Rice, who is in the straw business 
in Mansfield, Mass. Lilla M. Ware has one 
daughter, Carrie A. Ware. Lyman M., who 
married Mary Church, of Worcester, has three 
sons — Bertrand L., a machinist in Worces- 
ter; Ashley W. ; and Harold W. Rice. Earl 
L. Rice married Mary Fisher, of Westboro, 
Mass., and has one daughter living, Mar- 
garet E. 

Mr. Rice voted for Martin Van Buren when 
that statesman was the Free Soil candidate for 
President, and he has acted with the Republi- 
can party since its formation. For three 
years he was a member of the Board of Select- 
men, an Overseer of the Poor for two years, 
an Assessor for fifteen years, and he also 
served for a time on the School Board. In 
1883 he was a Representative to the State 
legislature, where he was assigned to the 
Committee on Labor, whose duty was to in- 
vestigate and report upon the eight -hour ques- 
tion, the weekly payment act, and other per- 
plexing problems. For some years past he 
has been the vice-president of the Grafton 
Savings Bank. He attends the Baptist 
church. His business undertakings were 
prosecuted with energy, ability, and persever- 
ance. To these essential qualities, together 
with a strict integrity, is due the success he 
has achieved. 



this 



OHN SLADE, a prominent resident 
and agriculturist of Paxton, the young- 
est of the five children of John and Lu- 
cretia (Howard) Slade, was born in 
town, February 3, 1827. His paternal 
grandfather, Henry Slade, a Massachusetts 
man by birth, who came of English ancestry, 
was one of the early settlers of Paxton. The 
father, who was a lifelong resident and farmer 
in Paxton, died here on November 23, 1865. 
His wife, Lucretia, was born in Holden. 
Their son Henry, who resided during his 
whole life in Paxton, was for two years a 
member of the Board of Selectmen. 

The farm upon which Mr. Slade was born 
lies about a mile and a half from the village 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



47 



of Paxton. He is the only one now living of 
the family of five that grew up there. His 
attendance at the district school ended when 
he was about nineteen years of age. In the 
summer of each year during the latter part of 
that period he helped his father on the farm. 
Since then he has spent his life chiefly in 
agriculture. At the present time he owns a 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres, and he 
carries on general farming. Besides carefully 
attending to his own business, he has found 
time to render good service to his townspeo- 
ple, in the capacities of Selectman and As- 
sessor of Taxes for three years each. In pol- 
itics he is a Republican. 

Mr. Slade's marriage took place on Novem- 
ber 28, 1855. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Jane E. Wheeler, born in South Royals- 
ton, is a daughter of Colonel Josiah and 
Martha (Foristall) Wheeler. Colonel 
Wheeler, of English descent, who was born in 
South Royalston, was an officer in the militia 
in his earlier years. His wife, who was a na- 
tive of Fitzwilliam, N.H., was of Scotch de- 
scent. Mr. and Mrs. Slade have been the 
parents of two children, as follows: Edgar 
O., who is a resident of Orange, Mass. ; and 
Ada I., who is the wife of Ira Maynard, of 
Holden. Both of the parents attend the Con- 
gregational church. With the exception of 
thirteen years spent in Rutland, they have 
been constant residents of Paxton, where they 
are well known and highly esteemed. 



/®Yo 



EORGE F. CURLEY, M.D., one 
\ '•) I of the youngest of Milford's physi- 
cians, and also one of the most popu- 
lar, was born in the town of Upton on the first 
clay of June, 1872, one of the nine children of 
Walter and Mary Curley. His father is a 
well-to-do farmer in that town. The Doctor 
graduated at Boston University in 1893 and 
at Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia 
three years later. His medical course was 
distinguished by thorough and accurate 
scholarship and a marked analytical faculty as 
shown in his logical diagnosis of disease. At 
graduation he gained the Forbes anatomical 
prize of one hundred and fifty dollars and 



through a competitive examination the ap- 
pointment of house surgeon for a year in 
Elizabeth General Hospital. The man tak- 
ing second rank below him was a graduate of 
Columbia College. 

At the expiration of his year's service in 
the hospital the Doctor opened an office in 
Milford, much against the advice of his 
friends and in spite of the fact that Milford 
already had fifteen established physicians 
within its borders. Contrary to almost uni- 
versal experience, the genial, yet dignified, 
young physician stepped at once into popular 
favor. So rapidly did his practice increase 
that he is now kept constantly busy. His 
skill as a medical practitioner is recognized 
and acknowledged, not only by the many per- 
sons who have had occasion to personally test 
it, but by his fellow-physicians and the com- 
munity at large. Dr. Curley is a member of 
the Thurber Medical Society and its librarian. 
He is examining physician of the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians. 



«■••»-►■ 



His 



OHN W. LIVERMORE, Selectman 
of Brookfield, an undertaker and a 
dealer in furniture, was born in South 
Royalston, Mass., on March 23, 1840. 

parents, Winthrop and Louisa (Bemis) 
Livermore, were natives respectively of Leices- 
ter and Spencer, Mass. The father, a son 
of David and a grandson of David Livermore, 
Sr. , was a carpenter and box-maker by trade. 
Residing for many years in Spencer, he was 
a Selectman of that town for a number of 
terms, and he died there in 1876. The 
mother was a daughter of Jonas Bemis, who 
was a soldier in the war of the Revolution. 

John W. Livermore obtained his education 
in the public schools of Spencer, to which his 
parents took him when he was three years 
old. Coming to Brookfield in 1S67, he 
formed a partnership with C. H. Giffin, and 
was subsequently engaged in the livery busi- 
ness, under the firm name of Giffin & Liver- 
more, for four years. Then he started in the 
undertaking and furniture business, which he 
has since carried on successfully. His goods 
in stock, which may be inspected at any time, 



4 8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



will be found exactly as represented — of good 
workmanship and on sale at reasonable 
prices. All deliveries are promptly made, 
and satisfaction is guaranteed. As an under- 
taker Mr. Livermore's services to the towns- 
people have been important. His discretion 
in making arrangements for funeral exercises 
cannot be overestimated. Nothing needful is 
left undone by him on such occasions. 

Mr. Livermore married Mary M. Giffin, of 
Spencer, who has borne him three children. 
These were: Lucy G., who is now the wife of 
Walter B. Mellen, of Brookfield; Robert G., 
who is a student at St. John's Military School 
at Manlius, N. Y. ; and a child that died in in- 
fancy. For a number of years Mr. Livermore 
has been the town sexton, and he is now serv- 
ing his third term as a member of the Board 
of Selectmen. He attends the Unitarian 
Congregational church. Fraternally, he is a 
member of Hayden Lodge, F. & A. M. ; and 
of the Royal Arcanum at Brookfield. In 
Brookfield he has the full confidence of his 
townsmen, and is valued both as a business 
man and as a citizen. 



(WZc 



EORGE H. FALES, Town Treasurer 
I 3 1 of West Brookfield, was born here, 
March 7, 1834, son °f John M. and 
Mary S. (Trask) Fales. His grandfather, 
Daniel Fales, who resided in Shrewsbury, 
Mass., was approaching his one hundredth 
birthday at the time of his death. John M. 
Fales, one of the eight children of Daniel and 
a native of Shrewsbury, died in his sixty- 
third year. A shoemaker by trade, he came 
to West Brookfield early in the thirties. 
After turning out hand-made work for a time, 
he engaged in the manufacture of boots and 
shoes by machinery, building the factory 
which is now owned by his son. A public- 
spirited citizen as well as an able business 
man, he was actively concerned in promoting 
the general welfare of the community. For 
two terms he represented his district with 
ability in the legislature. He was an es- 
teemed member of the Congregational church. 
His death occurred in October, 1867. Of 
his children there are three survivors, namely: 



Eliza, the wife of Dr. Julius Blodgett, of 
Newtonville, Mass.; Frank T. Fales, of this 
town; and George H., the subject of this 
sketch. The mother died in 1887. 

George H. Fales was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of West Brookfield and at the 
Worcester Academy. Beginning when eigh- 
teen years old, he was the superintendent of 
his father's factory, continuing in that capac- 
ity until the death of the elder Fales. Then 
he was in partnership with George A. Par- 
rett, under the firm name of John M. Fales, 
Son & Co., for eighteen years. Subsequently 
he admitted John G. Shackley, retaining the 
same firm name. In 1892 the concern was 
dissolved, and he retired. By his marriage 
with Laurinda Tomblin, a daughter of the 
late Lucius Tomblin, of West Brookfield, he 
has four daughters: Mary I., the wife of Sam- 
uel Wass, of Philadelphia; and Charlotte T., 
Georgie B. , and Marguerita, who are residing 
at home. 

In politics Mr. Fales is a Republican. 
For ten years he has served as Town Treas- 
urer. Keenly alive to the best interests of 
the town, his management of the town's 
funds is regarded as able, judicious, and safe. 
He is also a trustee of the Merriam Public 
Library. 



M 



AVID BALLARD ROBBINS, who 
was for many years an esteemed 
employee of the firm White & 
Denny, card clothing manufacturers 
of Leicester, was born in Rindge, N. H., 
April 2, 1817. He was a son of James and 
Sallie (White) Robbins, the former of whom 
was a native of Rindge, and the latter of 
Royalston, Mass. When a young man he 
came to Leicester to work for White & Denny, 
of which firm his maternal uncle, Alonzo 
White, was a member. He was employed by 
them for many years, practically spending the 
active portion of his life in their card cloth- 
ing manufactory. Though he had only a dis- 
trict-school education, by making good use of 
his opportunities he became well informed, 
and was able to take his place among those 
who had enjoyed much better advantages. 




GEORGE H. FALES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



5 1 



While somewhat retiring in disposition, he 
was, nevertheless, popular with his fellow- 
townsmen, and had the respect and confi- 
dence of all with whom he had acquaintance. 
He died May 26, 1893, aged seventy-six 
years, and was buried in Pine Grove Ceme- 
tery, Leicester. In politics he was a Repub- 
lican. He belonged to Morning Star Lodge 
of Masons at Worcester. On February 25, 
1S62, Mr. Robbins was married to Susan M. 
Bellows, who .survives him. She was born in 
Leicester, and is a daughter of Ezekiel and 
Catherine (Washburn) Bellows. Her father, 
a native of Paxton, Mass., was for many years 
engaged in agricultural pursuits in Leicester. 
He died here, November 4, 1883. Mrs. Bel- 
lows was born in this town. 




ENRY F. COGGSHALL, 



treasurer 
of the Fitchburg Gas and Electric 
Light Company, was born in Mans- 
field, Tolland County, Conn., De- 
cember 23, 1823, son of Peleg Sanford and 
Evelina (Dimmock) Coggshall. The Coggs- 
hall family is one of the oldest in New Eng- 
land, and the name is found frequently on the 
pages of history. John Coggshall, who came 
to America from the town of Coggeshall, Eng- 
land, in 1632, and settled in Boston, was 
Henry Coggshall's immigrant ancestor. A 
well-to-do merchant, he was a prominent cit- 
izen, and was Representative in the General 
Court for eight terms. Though a Deacon of 
the First Church, he was broad-minded and 
liberal, and was one of the supporters of 
Anne Hutchinson in her famous controversy. 
Banished on account of his religious prin- 
ciples, with twenty-three others, to Rhode 
Island, the refuge of Roger Williams and 
Anne Hutchinson, he was one of the com- 
pany which purchased the island of Newport 
from the Indians; and he was the first presi- 
dent of the Provincial Plantation. Two 
members of the family served in the Ameri- 
can army during the Revolution — -Major 
Coggshall and a private who fought in the 
battle of Bunker Hill; and George Coggshall 
was Captain of a privateer in the War of 
1812. John Coggshall, Henry F. Coggshall's 



grandfather, who was born in Newport, R.I. , 
became a farmer of Mansfield, Conn. He was 
a member of the Baptist church. He married 
a Miss Sanford, of Tiverton, R.I., and they 
reared three daughters and three sons. The 
last of these to pass away, Nancy Barrows, 
died in June, 1896, at the age of ninety-one. 

Peleg Sanford Coggshall was born in New- 
port, R.I. He was engaged for years in the 
manufacture of combs in Mansfield, Conn., a 
place noted for comb and silk manufactures. 
In the latter part of his life he was engaged 
in shoemaking. Like his father, he was, a 
member of the Baptist church. He died at 
the age of seventy-three years. His wife, 
who was a daughter of Jonathan Dimmock, of 
Mansfield, died at the age of sixty-three. 
They had a family of three sons and a daugh- 
ter, of whom Henry F. is the only survivor. 

Henry F. Coggshall acquired his element- 
ary education in the common schools of 
Mansfield. When he was fifteen years of age 
he went to work in a general store in that 
town, and was there engaged as clerk some 
three years. He was taught book-keeping by 
the proprietor of one of the mills at that 
place, and became so expert that the Stone- 
ville Manufacturing Company at Auburn, 
Mass., five miles from Worcester, hearing of 
his qualifications, wrote him to inquire what 
salary he would be satisfied with if engaged 
by them as book-keeper. He agreed to work 
for one hundred dollars a year and board, and 
was immediately engaged. On taking charge 
of their books, he found the affairs of the firm 
in confusion, and determined to strike a trial 
balance before proceeding further. This he 
accomplished after two weeks' hard work, 
laboring far into the night in order not to 
neglect his daily duties. He was book-keeper 
for the Stoneville Company seven years, hav- 
ing charge of their store and paying the help. 
Out of his meagre first year's salary he saved 
fifty dollars; and in three years, before he was 
twenty-one, he paid off a mortgage of three 
hundred and fifty dollars on his father's 
house. In the meantime Mr. Ackley, his em- 
ployer, leased the stone mill at Fitchburg, 
and Mr. Coggshall took charge of it in July, 
1845. He boarded with Lauren Pratt, whose 



52 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



house was on the present site of Nichols & 
Frost's dry-goods store on Main Street. 
Fitchburg was already a thriving town, con- 
nected by stage routes with Keene, Brattle- 
boro, Worcester, and other places. Mr. 
Coggshall, having by this time saved three 
hundred dollars, purchased a strip of land 
from Mr. Pratt, now largely covered by 
Nichols & Frost's store. Paying three hun- 
dred dollars down, he agreed to pay the bal- 
ance in instalments. He later purchased 
three acres of land on the other side of the 
river, on a part of which he erected a two- 
story house, laying out the remainder in 
building lots. Mr. Coggshall kept books for 
the Putnam Machine Company one year. 
Then for twenty-five years he was connected 
with the Fitchburg & Worcester Railroad and 
Boston, Clinton & Fitchburg Railroad as 
general ticket agent, freight and passenger 
agent and treasurer, successively, holding the 
last-named position from 1863 to 1871, in 
which latter year he resigned. In 1853 the 
Fitchburg Gas Company was organized, and a 
plant erected by Levi Benedict, of Rochester, 
N.Y., who was then building the gas works at 
Jamaica Plain. He then engaged Mr. Coggs- 
hall to take charge of the building of the gas 
works here. In December, 1853, Mr. Coggs- 
hall was chosen manager, and in 1866 he was 
made treasurer. In a paper which he read at 
the twenty-seventh annual meeting of the 
New England Association of Gas Light En- 
gineers at Young's Hotel, Boston, in Febru- 
ary, 1897, he graphically depicts the early 
struggles of the gas company; and, in reply to 
a remark by one of his audience, he said that 
he had to do all the work. The following 
paragraph is taken from his paper: — ■ 

"Now, what do we find has been the prog- 
ress in these forty-three years of gas manu- 
facturing? In 1853 three iron retorts to a 
bench, burning off four hundred and fifty 
pounds of coal in about five hours, with one 
man on a shift, producing eleven hundred feet 
to a charge. In 1897 six retorts to a bench, 
charging with eighteen hundred pounds of coal, 
and producing nine thousand feet in four hours, 
with two men to a shift." Mr. Coggshall has 
been a trustee of the Fitchburg Savings Bank 



for twenty-two years and a director in the 
Fitchburg National Bank eighteen years. He 
was director and treasurer of the Simonds 
Manufacturing Company for an extended 
period, was a member of the Rollstone Ma- 
chine Company with Mr. Charles T. Crocker 
for ten years, and is a trustee of the Old 
Ladies' Home in Fitchburg. Politically a 
Whig and Republican, in 1876 he served as 
Representative in the State legislature. He 
was a charter member and Junior Warden of 
Charles W. Moore Lodge, F. & A. M. ; be- 
longs to Thomas Royal Arch Chapter, 
R. A. M.; Hiram Council, R. & S. M., of 
Worcester; and was a charter member and 
Captain-general of Jerusalem Commandery, 
K. T. He is also a member of the Park Club 
of Fitchburg. For thirty years he has been 
connected with the Calvinistic Congregational 
church. 

Mr. Coggshall was married December 10, 
1846, to Sylvania L., daughter of Stephen 
Carpenter, of Brattleboro, Vt. 



T^AYRUS G. WOOD, for many years 
I \y one of the most prominent of the 

\is „ woollen manufacturers of Worcester 
County and an honored citizen of 
the city of Worcester, was born in Uxbridge, 
November 16, 1819. He was the son of Reu- 
ben and Sarah Wood, and belonged to one of 
the oldest and most respected families in the 
town. He was a lineal descendant of Will- 
iam Wood, who came to this country from 
England in 1638, and settled in Concord, 
Mass. Both the maternal and paternal grand- 
fathers of Mr. Wood served in the war of the 
Revolution. Mr. Wood, being the son of a 
farmer, spent much of his early life on the 
farm and at work in the mill, obtaining such 
education as the country school afforded at 
the time, a mental training and equipment 
which prepared him for the duties and needs 
of his subsequent career. 

On attaining his majority, being possessed 
of some savings of his own, he borrowed one 
hundred dollars in addition, and with this 
small capital started a country store on his 
own account. By degrees furniture and other 



III 



,HlIr 



i%iili 






&S^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



55 



lines were added to his stock, and his success 
was quite marked. His ambition was not 
satisfied with the ownership of a country 
store, and he realized that there was an op- 
portunity for him to become a manufacturer 
of woollens, and thus utilize the knowledge 
he had gained regarding the processes of pro- 
duction in early life. Accordingly, under 
the firm name of Wood & Capron, with Mr. 
Charles C. Capron as a partner, he began the 
making of shoddy and dealing in wool, 
woollen waste, etc. Mr. Wood retired from 
the partnership at the end of three years, and 
leased a mill in the southern part of Ux- 
bridge, carrying on the same kind of busi- 
ness. He not only supplied mills in the 
vicinity of Uxbridge, but also at various 
points in Rhode Island. It was during the 
panic after the Boston fire that Mr. Wood 
really began to extend his business into larger 
territory. 

In 1874 with A. W. Ward as partner, under 
the firm name of Wood & Ward, he began the 
manufacture of satinets at Quinapoxet, in the 
town of Holden, Mass. This was a small, 
three-set mill, and another set was added the 
following year. The firm was dissolved in 
1875; and after a year's connection with 
H. S. Morse the second partnership was dis- 
solved, and from that time onward Mr. Wood 
was sole owner. Though he was successful 
from the beginning, he passed through many 
struggles before his indomitable will and per- 
sistence conquered all obstacles. With new 
buildings and additional machinery, he in- 
creased his facilities according to the demand. 
In 1886 he bought the Lovellville mills, con- 
taining three sets of machinery, to which he 
added another set. Beginning with the three- 
set mill in 1874, he had in 1886 twelve sets 
of machinery in operation, with all the neces- 
sary belongings and homes for the employees. 
These mills, with their equipments, the fac- 
tory houses, and lands, make one of the neat- 
est villages in the county. From 1882 until 
his death, March 3, 1898, Mr. Wood served 
as Postmaster at Quinapoxet. 

Mr. Wood was a true type of the New Eng- 
land manufacturer — 'thrifty, hard-working, 
conscientious, courteous, and kindly; and his 



success in life was the fruit of his own toil. 
He started in a small way, and succeeded in 
building up his business by constant dili- 
gence, close economy, and sagacious business 
methods. He was not a man to seek or to 
enjoy public office, but his counsel was often 
sought when large issues were at stake ; and 
he was always firm in his opinions and well 
able to express them. 

Mr. Wood was an honorary member of the 
Worcester Light Infantry, and in Uxbridge he 
was an original member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, though never promi- 
nent in that organization. He was for sev- 
eral years a director of the Citizens' National 
Bank of Worcester and a member of the 
Board of Trade, in the success of which he 
took a zealous interest. The Worcester So- 
ciety of Antiquity also claimed him as a 
member. His religious affiliations were with 
the Church of the Unity, of which he was one 
of the strongest members. 

One of the leading citizens of Uxbridge, who 
had known Mr. Wood for many years, thus 
wrote of him after his death : — 

Mr. Wood was for many years a prominent 
citizen of Uxbridge. He was prominent in 
the large sense.* While a successful man of 
business, his character and spirit of enterprise 
identified him with whatever tended to ad- 
vance the best interests of the town. His in- 
fluence was always on the right side. He 
was open and generous-hearted. For every 
good cause he was ever ready to contribute of 
his means and energy. He had decided opin- 
ions, but they were intelligently formed and 
never offensively expressed. In 1854 Mr. 
Wood represented the town in the legislature, 
and during his residence in Uxbridge he held 
other and various positions of trust. He did 
not covet office. Integrity was one of his 
marked characteristics, and it never failed to 
secure him the confidence of all with whom 
he was associated in business; while his 
strong attachments, his love of home, his 
family, his friends, his church, and his native 
town and its associations made him highly 
esteemed in a wide circle of acquaintances. 
Mr. Wood was a devoted member of the Uni- 
tarian society in Uxbridge, and upon his re- 



56 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



moval to Worcester, eighteen years ago, the 
society felt it had lost one of its main pillars; 
and not less did the town feel that it had 
parted with one of its strongest and best 
citizens. 

Mr. Wood was married in 1853 to Lucetta, 
daughter of Joseph Day, Esq. Mrs. Lucetta 
Wood lived but a short time, and he was mar- 
ried again in 1858 to Mary U. F., daughter of 
Jonathan Southwick, Esq., of Uxbridge. 
Four children were born to them: John 
Franklin, Ernest Henry, Gertrude Southwick, 
and Sarah Louise. The two sons, Messrs. 
John Franklin and Ernest Henry Wood, who 
were associated in business with their father 
in his later years, continue to carry it on. 




"ON. RUFUS B. DODGE, who for 
many years has been a leading man 
of Charlton, was born in this town, 
February 9, 182 1, son of Gibbs and 
Mary (Wakefield) Dodge. He comes of pio- 
neer ancestry and of Revolutionary stock. 
His paternal grandfather, Moses Dodge, was 
a patriot in the Revolution and one of the 
early settlers of Charlton, whither he removed 
from the neighboring town of Sutton. Gibbs 
Dodge, who was born in Charlton, from his 
earliest years was engaged in farming and 
stone cutting. He possessed considerable 
legal ability, and was frequently called upon 
to settle estates in the neighborhood. He took 
an active part in the management of local 
matters, and, besides serving some years as 
Selectman of Charlton, held other offices of 
minor importance. He died in 1863. 

Rufus B. Dodge was brought up on a farm, 
receiving his education in the district school 
and at Nichols's Academy in Dudley, Mass. 
In the academy he made a special study of 
civil engineering, which he has since followed 
to a great extent in this vicinity, although he 
has always made farming his chief pursuit. 
When a young man he taught school for sev- 
eral winter terms. During his entire life he 
has kept himself well informed on the general 
topics of the clay. He has been Assessor of 
Charlton for a number of terms; the chairman 
of the Board of Selectmen for many years; a 



member of the School Committee for seven 
years; a Representative to the General Court 
in 1857; and in 1862 he was a member of the 
State Senate, in which he served as one of the 
Committee on Roads and Bridges, being 
elected on the Republican ticket, which he 
has uniformly supported. He also served the 
Federal government in the capacity of Post- 
master of Charlton for several years. 

On April 18, 1847, Mr. Dodge married Au- 
gusta Morse, daughter of the late Timothy 
Morse, of Charlton. Their golden wedding, 
which was celebrated April 18, 1897, was a 
most joyous occasion. Mr. and Mrs. Dodge 
have six children, namely: Arthur M., of 
Charlton; Myra S., the wife of W. W. 
Greene, of Worcester, Mass. ; Forbes B., of 
Charlton; Charles S. , also of Worcester; 
Rufus B. Dodge, Jr., now Mayor of Worces- 
ter; and Harris M., of this town. 



BEN THOMAS HALL, a well-known 
merchant of West Upton, son of 
Nahum B. and Betsy (Wood) Hall, 
was born in the town of Upton, August 16, 
1865. His first ancestor in this country was 
William Hall, who came from England and 
settled on the site of Upton in 1765. Will- 
iam's son, grandfather of Eben Hall and a 
prominent anti-slavery man, had a son, T. J. 
Hall, who was a Selectman of the town for 
sixteen years, the chairman of the Selectmen 
for the greater part of that period, and a Rep- 
resentative in the legislature of 1883. 

Nahum B. Hall, a mill-owner and a con- 
tractor and builder, was prominent in the 
affairs of this town. Like his brother, he was 
for several years on the Board of Selectmen, 
being first chosen when he was twenty-seven 
years of age. In 1874 he represented North- 
bridge and Upton in the legislature. At 
various times he was called upon by his 
townsmen to serve as Assessor, Overseer of 
the Poor, and a member of the School Board. 
In company with his brother, T. J. Hall, he 
started here the industry of manufacturing 
sashes and doors by power. His wife, who 
was a daughter of Reuben Wood, bore him 
two sons and four daughters, as follows: 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



57 



Sarah L., now residing in Hudson, who is 
the wife of F. H. Chamberlin and the 
mother of one daughter; Milly J., who is now 
Mrs. H. L. Patrick, of Hopedale, and the 
mother of one daughter; William C, now de- 
ceased; Susan M., who is a resident of Hud- 
son and the widow of the late A. S. Allen; 
Myra G., the wife of L. H. Jordan, who is 
the Postmaster of West Upton; and Eben 
Thomas Hall, the subject of this sketch. 
William, who graduated from Dartmouth Col- 
lege in the class of 1883, and subsequently 
followed the profession of civil engineer, died 
in 1897. He married Bertha Stewart, of 
Framingham, who bore him three sons and a 
daughter. 

Eben Thomas Hall was educated in the 
public schools of Upton. After leaving 
school he learned the trade of carpenter. 
Subsequently he worked in a store as clerk, 
and then, in 1889, he purchased of his 
brother-in-law the store where he is now car- 
rying on business. In this enterprise he has 
been very successful. At the present time he 
employs four assistants. He attends the Uni- 
tarian church in West Upton, and is a mem- 
ber of its Board of Trustees. In September, 
1897, he maried Alice M. Skinner, a daugh- 
ter of E. P. and Charlotte Skinner, of this 
place. He worthily sustains the honored 
name left by the preceding generations of his 
family, and is a valued resident of the town 
in which his life thus far has been spent. 



(5 ThOMAS S. SNOW, the proprietor of 
' I the Leicester & Worcester Express 
Company, and a successful coal dealer 
at Leicester, was born in the latter town, Oc- 
tober 21, 1837. His parents, Pliny and Han- 
nah (Sadler) Snow, were both natives of 
Worcester County. Pliny Snow followed 
farming as his principal occupation. He was 
also engaged in teaming, and conducted a 
saw-mill. Three of the children born of his 
marriage with Hannah Sadler are living; 
namely, John W. , Mary A., and Thomas S. 
Mary is the wife of P. M. Freeman. 

When but fifteen years old, Thomas S. 
Snow was left fatherless. He then left 



school, and spent several years engaged in 
driving team for different parties. In Au- 
gust, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, Forty- 
second Massachusetts Volunteers, and subse- 
quently served under General Banks in New 
Orleans. Honorably discharged in August, 
1863, he returned to Leicester, and, resuming 
his former occupation of driving team, he fol- 
lowed it up to about 1S72. Then he and Na- 
than Lamb, in the firm of Snow & Lamb, em- 
barked in the express business on the route 
between Leicester and Worcester. About six 
years later the partnership was dissolved, 
since which time Mr. Snow has conducted the 
business on his own acount. He has also 
carried on a good business in coal for many 
years. 

On December 24, 1869, Mr. Snow was 
united in marriage with Miss Ellen Lynch, 
of Worcester, Mass. Three children have 
blessed the union, namely: Mandana E., now 
the wife of Dr. H. L. Shepard, of Winches- 
ter, Mass.; Bertha E., living at home; and 
Marshall S. Mr. Snow is a Republican 
voter. He is an esteemed member of George 
H. Thomas Post, No. 131, G. A. R. , which 
he served as Vice-Commander for one year. 



/®Yo 



EORGE R. HAMANT, Town Treas- 
\ fST urer of North Brookfield, was born 
in Brookfield, March 11, 1S43, son 
of Isaac and Louisa (Rice) Hamant. His 
great-grandfather, Job Hamant, was an early 
settler in Sturbridge, Mass. ; and Seth Ha- 
mant, his grandfather, was a native of that 
town. Isaac Hamant, the father, went from 
Sturbridge, his native town, to Brookfield, 
where he followed agriculture in connection 
with shoemaking for many years, and served 
the community in the capacity of Selectman. 
He died in 1878. Louisa, his wife, was a 
native of Brookfield and a daughter of Will- 
iam Rice, a Revolutionary soldier. 

At the age of nineteen George R. Hamant, 
having acquired his education in the public 
schools of his native town, went to Worces- 
ter, and apprenticed himself in the drug store 
of Bush & Co. After serving three years as 
apprentice and four years as a regular clerk 



58 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



with that firm, he was engaged in business 
for himself at Woonsocket, R. I., for about 
four years. At the end of that time he 
opened an apothecary establishment in North 
Brookfield, and conducted it profitably until 
1895. Then he sold out to Albert W. Po- 
land, and has since devoted his time to vari- 
ous business interests. At present he is the 
clerk of the Board of Directors of the North 
Brookfield Railroad Company. After serving 
for many years as a trustee of the North 
Brookfield Savings Bank, he was elected its 
president in June, 1894. He has been Town 
Treasurer since 1876. Under his careful ad- 
ministration the public finances have been 
kept in a satisfactory condition. He is also 
serving as Town Clerk, Cemetery Commis- 
sioner, and trustee of the Free Library. A 
Republican in politics, he is a member of the 
Republican Town Committee. 

In 1865 Mr. Haraant was united in marriage 
with Julia A. Fiske, a daughter of the late 
Daniel Fiske, of Brookfield. He is con- 
nected with the Masonic order in Worcester 
and with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows in this town, and he is a member and 
the clerk of the First Congregational Society. 



7TtHARLES TAFT ALDRICH, a man- 
I Sr-^ ufacturer in the village of Millbury, 
\%>^, was born here, April 12, 1845. A 
son of Charles Aldrich, he is a de- 
scendant of one of seven brothers named Al- 
drich who emigrated from Old England to 
New England. Some of the seven went West 
and some South; but the founder of the fam- 
ily to which Charles T. Aldrich belongs set- 
tled in Rhode Island, which was its home for 
many years. 

Isaac Aldrich, the grandfather of Charles 
T., born at Burrillville, R.I., in 1777, died 
in Providence, R.I., in 1867, aged ninety 
years. Having begun the manufacture of 
woollen goods in Burrillville when a young 
man, he became one of the most prominent 
and successful business men of that place, and 
was one of the pioneer manufacturers of the 
State. In the Masonic order he attained the 
thirty-third degree. He first married Mary 



Scammell, whose uncle, Alexander Scammell, 
was a close friend of General Washington, and 
served in the Revolutionary War as Colonel 
and Adjutant-general. A brave soldier, he 
lost his life in a "forlorn hope" attack on 
Yorktown, when Cornwallis was besieged 
there. Of the children of Isaac and Mary 
Aldrich, five reached maturity, three sons and 
two daughters. The two youngest children, 
Charles and James, are still living, and James 
resides in Providence, R.I. After the death 
of the mother, the father married again. 
Charles Aldrich, who was born in Blackstone, 
Mass., in 1818, is now living retired from ac- 
tive business in Spencer, Worcester County. 
During his earlier life he manufactured 
woollen goods in different towns of this State, 
including Bellingham, Ashland, and Worces- 
ter. At Millbury, in 1843, he married Abi- 
gail Kingsbury Taft, a daughter of Alanson 
and Mary (Kingsbury) Taft, of Webster, 
Mass. Of their eight children, two died in 
childhood. The survivors are: Charles T. , 
the subject of this sketch; Albert T., a resi- 
dent of Worcester; and James J., of Spencer. 

Educated in the Uxbridge High School, 
Charles T. Aldrich was fitted for a college 
course or a business career. Choosing the 
latter, he secured employment in a woollen- 
mill. After acquiring some acquaintance 
with the business, he became associated with 
the firm of Aldrich & Cutler, of which his 
father was the head; and he was with them in 
Bellingham for four years. In 1868 he went 
to Southern Kansas, and for four years was 
there engaged in milling and agricultural pur- 
suits. Returning then to Massachusetts, he 
established a factory in Ashland, Middlesex 
County, where he made woollen goods for 
eighteen years, employing the average num- 
ber of seventy-five hands, and having a pros- 
perous business until he was burned out, Oc- 
tober 7, 1890. Two months later he bought 
his present plant in Millbury, where in the 
manufacture of unions and satinets he em- 
ploys one hundred hands, and is carrying on a 
thriving business. Politically, he is a 
straightforward Republican; and, fraternally, 
he is a Master Mason and an Odd Fellow. 

On December 24, 1864, Mr. Aldrich mar- 







CHARLES T. ALDRICH. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



61 



ried Emma G. Aldrich, of Blackstone, Mass., 
a distant relative of his and a daughter of 
William and Olive (Foster) Aldrich. She 
died in November, 1889, leaving four chil- 
dren, all of whom are married; namely, 
Charles, Henry, Louis, and Alice, A second 
marriage on December 6, 1890, united Mr. 
Aldrich with Susan H. Freeman, of Cam- 
bridge, Mass. Mr. Aldrich has been quite 
an extensive traveller, both in this country 
and abroad. He visited the Paris Exposition, 
France, Germany, Switzerland, Belgium, and 
England, in 1889; and in 1895 he made 
another trip across the ocean. 



TT^HARLES R. PROUTY, a thorough- 
I Vr^ going and prosperous agriculturist of 
^Hs>^ West Brookfield, son of Homer R. 
Prouty, was born in North Brook- 
field, Mass., April 4, 1833. The father was 
born, bred, and educated in Spencer, Mass. 
When a * young man he taught school for 
several winters. After his marriage he began 
farming at Waite's Corners in North Brook- 
field, where he was successfully engaged in 
agricultural pursuits and in manufacturing 
woollen goods for many years. Taking a 
deep interest in the welfare of the town of his 
adoption, he was active in the management of 
local affairs, and served as Assessor for sev- 
eral years. He died in September, 1877, at 
a good old age. One of his brothers, Isaac 
Prouty, was the founder of the extensive shoe 
manufactory at Spencer known as the Prouty 
Shoe Shop, supposed to have been at that time 
the largest plant in the world. Homer R. 
Prouty married Nancy Allen, of Spencer, 
Mass., who bore him several children. Of 
these, three survive, namely: Charles R., the 
subject of this sketch; Henry M., a resident 
of Hardwick, Mass. ; and Plomer D., a resi- 
dent of North Brookfield. 

Charles R. Prouty left school while yet of 
school age, to enter a shoe shop, where he was 
afterward engaged in pegging shoes until he 
was about seventeen years old. Since then 
he has given his attention to agriculture in 
all its branches. In 1856 he removed to West 
Brookfield with his newly-won bride. Six 



years after, he purchased his present farm, 
which compares favorably with any in this 
vicinity. Since coming here he has been 
actively identified with all the leading move- 
ments of special value to the town. He has 
served wisely as Assessor of West Brookfield 
for ten years and as Overseer of the Poor for 
one term. In politics he is a stanch Republi- 
can. He joined the local Farmers' Club soon 
after its organization, was its president for 
one year, and for a long time one of its ex- 
ecutive committee. He is a member of the 
Congregational church. 

On March 19, 1856, Mr. Prouty married 
Susan, daughter of Joseph W. and Ann (Shaw) 
Wood, of West Brookfield. The only child 
born of the union is Albert S. Prouty, of 
West Rutland, Mass. He married Emma J. 
Newton, and they have three children — ■ Leon- 
ard A., Katie B., and Grace M. Mrs. Prouty 
and her brother, Charles W. Wood, of this 
town, are the only survivors of her parents' 
children. 



OSEPH B. LOMBARD, formerly a 
representative man of Warren, was 
born here on November 16, 1817. A 
son of Elijah and Thirza (Brown) 
Lombard, he was of English extraction. His 
immigrant ancestor, who came to the country 
in 1646, was a settler of Springfield, Mass. 
The father, who was born in Brimfield, came 
to Warren in early life, and worked for a 
time at the blacksmith's trade. Later he be- 
came a hotel-keeper. His wife, Thirza, was 
born in what is now known as Warren. He 
bore the same name as his father, who was a 
soldier of the Revolution, and died of camp 
fever. 

Joseph B. Lombard attended the schools of 
his native town, and also the Westfield and 
Oxford Academies. Upon reaching his ma- 
jority he went into a store in Warren as 
clerk, and during several years subsequent to 
that time gave his attention entirely to a 
mercantile business. He then worked at 
farming for a time. Following that he was 
for five years in the provision business at 
Warren village. Later on and until his re- 



62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tirement from business he kept a general 
merchandise store in West Warren, which 
was unusually prosperous. Politically, Mr. 
Lombard was an independent voter. He was 
warmly interested in everything pertaining to 
the welfare of his native town, and served his 
townspeople in many ways. For several years 
he was Selectman and for a part of the time 
the chairman of the board. He also served in 
the capacities of Highway Surveyor, Assessor 
of Taxes, Moderator of town meetings, Over- 
seer of the Poor, and Constable. He was a 
member of the committee appointed to super- 
vise the erection of the fire-engine house. In 
1857 and again in 1868 he represented the 
town in the legislature. A man of great pub- 
lic spirit, he was a generous contributor to 
benevolent enterprises and a liberal supporter 
of the cause of Christianity. 

Early in life Mr. Lombard married Alice 
A. Chapin, of Warren. Of her four children 
by him, two are living — Mary C. and Joseph 
Edward. Mary is now the wife of Marcus 
Burroughs, of Warren. Joseph Edward Lom- 
bard, who is a prominent resident of West 
Warren, has been for twenty years a qualified 
Justice of the Peace. He is also the organist 
of the Congregational church in Warren. 
Mr. Lombard, Sr., died September 17, 1890. 




,HARLES WILLIAM CARROLL, a 
contracting stone mason of Milford, 
son of Richard and Catherine 
(Davis) Carroll, was born in this 
town, November 1, 1863. The father, who 
was born in Ireland, February 1, 18 16, son of 
Michael and Mary (Woods) Carroll, came to 
Milford when a young man, and at once began 
to work as a contracting stone-mason, build- 
ing houses, foundations, etc. One of the 
pioneers of the granite industry in Milford, 
he opened a large quarry, which was subse- 
quently sold to the Milford Granite Company, 
and from which he took out stone for his own 
use. Up to the time of his death, which oc- 
curred on November 15, 1882, he was in ac- 
tive business. He built both private and 
public edifices in this and adjoining towns, 
and he laid the foundations of the Town Hall 



and Washington Block. Partly as a recrea- 
tion, as he was fond of agriculture, he carried 
on extensive farming on his farm in Carroll 
Street, on the northern edge of the village. 
This street was laid out and named for him. 
The farm he reclaimed from a rocky, barren 
waste, and erected upon it the present sub- 
stantial and spacious house and farm build- 
ings. His family now reside here. He was 
active in town affairs, and he is said to have 
been the first Irishman to serve as a member 
of Milford's Board of Selectmen, the duties 
of which office he ably discharged for several 
years. He also served at various times on 
the Board of Overseers of the Poor. In 1851 
he married Catherine Davis, a daughter of 
John and Joanna Francis Brennan Davis, born 
in Ireland, April 1, 1826. Of this union the 
following-named children have been born: 
Michael Joseph, on June 19, 1852; Joanna 
Maria, January 14, 1856; Charles William, 
November 1, 1863; Catherine Veronica, Oc- 
tober 19, 1866; and Richard Davis Carroll, 
January 14, 1868. The first named of these 
graduated from Holy Cross College, Worces- 
ter, in 1876, and subsequently studied for 
three years and a half in Montreal, after 
which he was duly ordained a priest. He 
was for three years a curate in Northampton, 
Mass., and for the last eleven years he has 
been the pastor of the Fisherville Catholic 
Church, having also in his charge the mission 
at Upton. Joanna Maria resides on the home- 
stead; Catherine Veronica is the wife of Dr. 
J. J. Duggan, of this town; and Richard 
Davis Carroll is associated in business with 
his brother, Charles W. 

Charles William Carroll was in business 
with his father until the latter sold his gran- 
ite quarries. Then he was superintendent for 
the Milford Granite Company for two years. 
After this he formed a partnership with Mr. 
Ryan in the clothing business, which was 
carried on for the next five years in a Main 
Street store, and is now conducted by the 
Globe Clothing Company. Although this 
venture proved most successful, Mr. Carroll 
became convinced at the end of five years 
that life indoors was not entirely beneficial to 
him. Consequently, deciding to engage in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



63 



some more healthful occupation, he sold out 
his interest, and again engaged in the granite 
industry. After spending a year in the em- 
ployment of Timothy Shea as superintendent, 
he opened the extensive quarries which he is 
now excavating. Mr. Carroll does a most 
prosperous business, not only fulfilling large 
contracts, but furnishing rough and cut stone 
to other contractors. He ships granite to all 
parts of New England and to customers in 
New York, and has furnished it for a number 
of railroad bridges and embankments. 

For several years Mr. Carroll was the chair- 
man of the Democratic Town Committee, of 
which he is still a member. In 1894 and 
1895 he was sent by the town to represent it 
in the legislature. During his first term 
there he was a member of the Committee on 
Public Service, and during his second he 
served in the Committee on Railroads. Mr. 
Carroll is an active member of the Catholic 
Debating Society and a Deputy Grand 
Knight of the Valencia Council, K. of C. 



"ir\ANIEL F. FITZGERALD, the 
I I manager and treasurer of the 
^ £p j Knights of Labor co-operative store 
at 94 Front Street, Worcester, son 
of Daniel and Bridget (Walsh) Fitzgerald, 
was born in Worcester, February 24, 1863. 
His father, a native of County Kerry, Ireland, 
emigrated to America in 1850. The family 
name is an honored one in Ireland, where it 
has been known since the time of the Anglo- 
Norman conquest. Although the Fitzgeralds 
have intermarried somewhat with the Saxon 
races, they are to-day, it is claimed, a more 
pure-blooded Celtic family than any other in 
Ireland. One of its noted members was Lord 
Edward Fitzgerald, who was an active leader 
in the Irish Rebellion of 1798. 

After obtaining a practical education in the 
public schools of his native city, Daniel F. 
Fitzgerald learned the trade of iron moulder, 
and subsequently worked at it as a journeyman 
for about six years. When only twenty-two 
years of age he was Master Workman of Iron 
Moulders' Assembly, No. 7073. At about the 
same time he was prominent among those who 



were making an effort to organize the Worces- 
ter Central Labor Union. He has occupied 
his present position of manager and treasurer 
of the co-operative store for the past eleven 
years. Since his retirement from political 
life in 1897, he has given his full time to his 
business. For so young a man Mr. Fitzger- 
ald has received a large share of political 
honors. At the age of twenty-four he was 
first elected a member of the Common Coun- 
cil from Ward Four. In this capacity he 
served his constituents for eight successive 
years. During a part of that time he was 
chairman of the committee then known as the 
Highways and Sidewalks Committee, and a 
member of the Committee on Finance for six 
years. In 1896 he was chosen Alderman, the 
election having been the first held under the 
minority representation clause. He served 
in the Board of Aldermen for one year, ■ in 
which the contract was placed for the new city 
hall building, and during which he was a 
member of the Education and Military Com- 
mittees and a trustee of the City Hospital. 
He was influential in securing an appropria- 
tion for the construction of the boulevard at 
the Lake, north of the Causeway. Among 
the benefits derived from this appropriation 
was the furnishing of labor to many unem- 
ployed men during the panic of 1893. Mr. 
Fitzgerald could always be depended upon to 
support all measures for the public good, and 
was a strong advocate for the opening of new 
streets through the congested parts of the 
city. His political principles are Demo- 
cratic, and for several years he was a member 
of the Democratic City Committee. 

Mr. Fitzgerald served for eight years as a 
call member of the Worcester Fire Depart- 
ment, being lieutenant of Protective Hose 
No. 7 for half of that time. For three years 
he was a member of the Emmet Guards, while 
they were an independent company; and at 
the formation of their veteran corps he was 
chosen the first president, which position he 
filled for three years. He is a member of 
Court City of Worcester, Foresters of Amer- 
ica, of which he has been the secretary, and 
was Chief Ranger in 1894 and 1895. Since 
1891 he has been sent as delegate from the 



64 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



court to the Grand Court of the State. The 
Grand Court also chose him as a represent- 
ative to the Supreme Court, held in Cleve- 
land in 1895 and in Denver in 1897. At the 
Cleveland session he served as chairman of 
the Committee on Unwritten Work, and at the 
Denver he was the chairman of the Commit- 
tee on Mileage and per diem. At the present 
time he is serving in the highest non-elective 
office of the order in the State, that of 
Deputy Supreme Chief Ranger. At the last 
convention of the State Court, held in May, 
1898, he was elected Grand sub-Chief Ranger 
of the State. He is also a member of the 
uniformed Foresters, known as the Knights 
of Sherwood Forest. For two terms he has 
served the Worcester Conclave as Commander 
and the Supreme Conclave as Quartermaster- 
general. Mr. Fitzgerald is likewise a mem- 
ber of Division No. 1, A. O. H., and of the 
Knights of Robert Emmet. He attends St. 
John's Catholic Church, of which he has 
been a devoted member for many years. 



W\ 



ARREN ELDREDGE MOORE, a 
veteran agriculturist of Northboro, 
lass., was born December 31, 
1 S 1 7, at Berlin, Mass., in the same county of 
Worcester, being the son of Warren and Han- 
nah (Carter) Moore. Warren Moore was an 
industrious and thrifty farmer. He spent his 
life in the town of Berlin; and, besides being 
very active in military affairs, he was promi- 
nent in religious circles and assisted in build- 
ing the Orthodox church. Both he and his 
wife died in 1826, before reaching middle 
age. 

Warren E. Moore was left an orphan when 
but nine years old, and subsequently lived 
with relatives in Berlin until he was six- 
teen. He then came to Northboro, and for 
seven years thereafter worked as a farm 
laborer. At the age of twenty-three he 
bought the original part of his present home- 
stead, which was then known as the old Hol- 
land Maynard place. Industrious, energetic, 
and progressive, he added to the improvements 
already made, and as time went on bought ad- 
joining land. He has now a fine farm of one 



hundred acres in a good state of cultivation, 
the visible result of a half-century of well- 
directed toil. 

In politics Mr. Moore was formerly an old- 
line Whig, and since the formation of the Re- 
publican party he has been one of its firmest 
supporters. During the progress of the late 
Civil War he served as Selectman, and he has 
also ably filled other town offices. He was 
for many years president of the Northboro 
Agricultural Society. He has been a con- 
sistent and valued member of the Orthodox 
church ever since he was eighteen years of 
age, and for twenty years has served as Dea- 
con. He has also been superintendent of the 
Sunday-school and its librarian. 

Mr. Moore has been twice married. His 
first wife, Abbie Cutting, of Princeton, Mass., 
died in 1867, leaving four children, namely: 
Mary Susan, a successful school teacher, who 
died at the age of twenty-eight years ; Levi 
Eldridge, now superintendent of the Grafton 
& Upton Railway; Josiah Lorenzo, a resident 
of Northboro; and Hannah, wife of De Witt 
Farwell, of Fitchburg, Mass. Two other 
children died in infancy. In 1870 Mr. Moore 
married Emma Newton, of Newfane, Vt. 
Levi Eldridge Moore has been twice married, 
and has two sons and two daughters. His 
first wife was Marcia Kidder and his second 
Alice Gordon. Josiah L. Moore is married 
to Miss Etta Adams, of this town. They 
have four sons, namely: Harry, who was grad- 
uated from the Northboro High School, and 
is now in Bates College, Lewiston, Me. ; and 
Arthur, Robert, and Ernest, who are all at- 
tending school. A daughter named Clara was 
drowned at the age of eleven years. 






the 



ARREN A. BLAIR, chairman of 

the Overseers of the Poor at West 

Brookfield, has been connected with 

management of local affairs for many 



years, and is among the best known and most 
respected residents of the place. This town, 
where he was born February 2, 1822, was also 
the birthplace of his father, Deacon Reuben 
Blair. Of Scotch extraction, he comes of 
pioneer stock. His great-grandfather, Robert 







WARREN E. MOORE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



67 



Blair, the founder of the family in Worcester 
County, was one of the earliest settlers of 
Warren. 

Reuben Blair, Sr., the grandfather of War- 
ren A., was born in Warren. Soon after 
coining of age he removed to West Brookfield, 
and purchased a tract of timber land. Here, 
after erecting a small log house, he proceeded 
to hew out a farm from the woods. A man of 
resolute courage and thorough patriotism, he 
fought in the great struggle for national inde- 
pendence, and in his later years he drew a 
pension for his services in that war, Deacon 
Reuben Blair, born and brought up on the 
homestead, helped to clear and otherwise im- 
prove the place, and in due time succeeded to 
itspossession. He married Patty Smith, who 
was born in Pomfret, Conn. A woman of 
strong personality, possessing marked mental 
and physical vigor, she outlived him by a long 
period, attaining the notable age of one hun- 
dred and two years. She was a member of 
the Congregational Church of West Brook- 
field, of which her husband was the Deacon 
for a length of time. 

Having completed his education at the 
Monson Academy, Warren A. Blair selected 
farming as his regular occupation, and contin- 
ued to reside on the homestead. On the 
death of his father the place became his 
property, and he was there engaged in gen- 
eral farming and lumbering until 1868. 
Then he removed to the village, having dis- 
posed of the homestead, which is now used as 
the Town Farm of West Brookfield. He has 
been an efficient agent as well as a pleased 
witness of the progress of the town, which has 
now reached a high state of prosperity. For 
twenty-four years he has served as Assessor, 
was for seven years on the Board of Select- 
men, and for twelve years he has been an 
Overseer of the Poor, being the chairman of 
the- Overseers for a large part of that time. 
In politics he supports the Republican party, 
and he is an influential member of the West 
Brookfield Farmers' Club. 

On December 26, 1850, Mr. Blair 'married 
Mary F. Burgess, who was born in West 
Springfield, Mass. Her father, Jeremiah 
Burgess, a native of Springfield, died in the 



prime of manhood, when Mrs. Blair was but 
fifteen years old. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Catherine Ashley, was born and 
educated in West Springfield. After surviv- 
ing him for some time, she died in 1889 at 
the advanced age of ninety-five years. Of the 
three children born to Mr. and Mrs. Blair, 
Frank W. Blair, of Worcester, is the only sur- 
vivor. Annie F. and Roderick A. died when 
young. Mr. and Mrs. Blair are active mem- 



bers of the Congregational church. 



Mr. 



Blair for twenty -three years has served on 
the Parish Committee, and Mrs. Blair is a 
member of the Home Missionary Society. 



OSEPH MURDOCK, who was formerly 
the president of the American Card 
Clothing Company and a representative 
man of Leicester, was born here, June 
15, 18 1 8, son of Joshua and Clarissa (Harts- 
horn) Murdock. He came of Scotch origin. 
His great-grandfather, also named Joshua 
Murdock, was a Sergeant of volunteers during 
the war of the Revolution. William Mur- 
dock, of Westminster, son of Joshua, was his 
grandfather. The father, who was a native of 
Westminster, Mass., followed cabinet-making 
in Leicester for many years. The mother was 
a native of Medfield, Mass. 

Joseph Murdock attended the common 
schools and subsequently Leicester Academy. 
He remained in his native town until he was 
eighteen years of age. Going then to Macon, 
Ga., he was there engaged as a clerk in a mer- 
cantile business for a short time. Subse- 
quently he became a partner in the firm of 
Bond & Murdock, which existed until 1847. 
Returning to Leicester in 1848, he formed 
a partnership with his brother, Joshua Mur- 
dock, Jr., the firm being known as J. & J. 
Murdock. An extensive business in the man- 
ufacture of card clothing was carried on, and 
the original firm existed until 1890. In that 
year the business was absorbed by the Ameri- 
can Card Clothing Company, for which J. & J. 
Murdock have since been the agents. Mr. 
Murdock, as the president of the company, 
was the most important factor in the develop- 
ment and successful issue of its business 



68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



transactions. His long experience as a man- 
ufacturer gave him a wide knowledge of com- 
mercial affairs. As the agent of a company 
which conducts large transactions he had 
much experience in financial management. 
He was a director of the Mechanics' National 
Bank of Worcester and a trustee of Leicester 
Academy for a long period of years. 

In 1842 Mr. Murdock was united in mar- 
riage with Julia Carpenter, of Brookfield. 
Julius O. Murdock, of Leicester, is their only 
son. Mrs. Murdock died on October 29, 
1890. In politics Mr. Murdock was a Repub- 
lican. For a number of years he was Select- 
man of the town and for some portion of that 
time the chairman of the board. His first 
Presidential vote was cast when General Will- 
iam Henry Harrison was elected. He was a 
member of the Congregational church in 
Leicester, and gave liberally toward the support 
of its various activities. Mr. Murdock fur- 
nished a notable illustration of a successful 
business man who won his place in the com- 
mercial world by his own energy and perse- 
verance. He died April 19, 1898, after an 
illness of six weeks, and was buried in Pine 
Grove Cemetery, Leicester. 




LI WARREN BATCHELOR, a well- 
known business man of West Upton, 
son of Daniel VV. and Maria (War- 
ren) Batchelor, was born in Upton, June 30, 
1 84 1. His mother was a grand -daughter of 
Elijah Warren, one of the early settlers of 
this town and the founder of the old Warren 
homestead T which may still be seen about a 
half-mile from West Upton village. Her 
father, Major Eli Warren, was one of the 
foremost men of Upton for a half-century 
and a pioneer in the boot and shoe manufact- 
uring business here when all the work was 
done by hand. His shoe shop was opposite 
the site on which West Upton Hotel now 
stands. He also kept a large general store. 
His title of Major was obtained in the State 
militia during the old training days. Robust 
in health and of a muscular physique, he took 
pride in his physical strength. It is related 
that when past eighty years of age he could 



go into the field with a scythe, and cut as 
large a swath as any of his men. A solid, re- 
liable business man, no one in the town was 
more respected. A man of strong will power, 
he always said what he meant and meant what 
he said. It was said of him that his word 
was as good as his bond, and his bond was as 
good as gold. Major Warren built a section 
of the old Worcester and Hartford turnpike, a 
part of which is still standing. This section, 
which crossed the meadows near West Upton, 
on the night before it was to be accepted by 
the commissioners sank from view into the 
mud, so that, when the Major awoke in the 
morning, he found himself thirty thousand 
dollars poorer than he was when he went to 
bed the night before. He was a zealous Uni- 
tarian, and was one of the principal contribu- 
tors toward the building of the old Unitarian 
church, since sold to the Catholic society. 
At his death he left a fund of four thousand 
dollars to be used for the benefit of the Uni- 
tarians. 

Having received his education at the High- 
land Military School, Eli Warren Batchelor 
began working in his father's boot and shoe 
factory, which was carried on under the name 
of D. W. Batchelor & Son until 1879. Tnen 
he took charge of the business, and conducted 
it for five years. Since that time he has been 
engaged in the coal business in West Upton, 
also conducting a large dairy and stock farm. 

Mr. Batchelor was married in 1865 to a 
daughter of William K. Knowlton, the 
founder of the well-known firm of William 
K. Knowlton & Sons. Mr. Knowlton, who 
was closely identified with the industrial de- 
velopment of Upton, born in Boston on June 
29, 1809, died in Upton in July, 1886. His 
father having died while William was yet 
young, he was apprenticed to a farmer and 
cooper. At the age of twenty he purchased 
his time and went to Northbridge, where he 
began to learn bottoming shoes. Shortly 
after he formed a partnership, and engaged in 
the straw business in Upton. Subsequently 
he carried on the business alone until he re- 
ceived into partnership his four sons, who 
have conducted it since his death. Mr. 
Knowlton was a Representative in the legis- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



69 



latures of 1869 and 1872, and was State Sena- 
tor in 1878 and 1879. In 1880 he was sent 
as delegate to the Republican national con- 
vention. Warmly interested in educational 
matters, he took an active part in the forma- 
tion of the Agricultural School at Amherst, 
and was afterward a trustee and patron of the 
institution, as well as a donor to the Worces- 
ter County Free Institute of Industrial Sci- 
ence at Worcester. He was an incorporator 
and a director of the National Bank of Upton. 
The new Unitarian church at West Upton was 
practically built by him, and he gave five hun- 
dred dollars to the Upton Town Library. 
The maiden name of his wife, the mother of 
Mrs. Batchelor, was Caroline Taft. Mr. and 
Mrs. Batchelor had one daughter, Carrie, who 
died six years ago, at the age of twenty-one 
years. 




EV. CHARLES P. BLANCHARD, 
formerly a prominent and influential 
resident of Brookfield, was born in 
Richmond, Ind., March 13, 1S43, 
son of Albert C. and Abby W. (Hitchcock) 
Blanchard. The father was a native of Brook- 
field, which for years was the home of the 
grandfather, Amasa Blanchard ; and the 
mother was born in West Brookfield. When 
a young ; man, Albert went to Richmond, 
where he became a successful merchant, and 
for a number of years was the president of a 
bank in that city. Having acquired a fortune, 
he returned to his native town, where his last 
years were spent in retirement; and he died 
here in the seventies. He left a family of 
three children: Albert H., of New York 
City; Abby F., of Philadelphia; and Charles 
P., the subject of this sketch. 

Having been fitted for college at the 
Groton (Mass.) Academy, Charles P. Blanch- 
ard graduated from Yale University with the 
class of 1865 and from the Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary, New York City, in 1868. After 
his ordination to the ministry he selected for 
his field of labor the State of Kansas, where 
he was engaged in regular pastoral work for 
some time. Then, returning to New Eng- 
land, he located permanently in .Brookfield. 



For a number of years he was busily engaged 
in labor of a religious and philanthropic nat- 
ure, assisting in the establishment and sup- 
port of churches, and otherwise seeking, with 
praiseworthy zeal, to improve the facilities 
for giving religious instruction. For many 
years he served upon the School Committee, 
being the chairman of the board for the greater 
part of the time. The present excellent sys- 
tem of public education enjoyed by the town 
is mainly the result of his efforts. As an 
advocate of temperance and prohibition, his 
influence was far-reaching; and his indefatiga- 
ble labor in behalf of the cause was, unques- 
tionably, the means of securing a no-license 
vote in this town. His death on January 2, 
1895, was regarded as a public loss. 

On May 7, 1873, Mr. Blanchard was united 
in marriage with Annie E. Brown, of West 
Brookfield, a daughter of Hammond and Roxa 
(Bemis) Brown, neither of whom is living. 
Born of the marriage was one daughter, Abby 
F. Blanchard, who is a graduate of Wellesley 
College. 




1OUIS E. CHASE, of Sutton, a mem- 
ber of the D. T. Dudley & Son Com- 
pany, manufacturers of shuttles and 
shuttle irons, was born in Saunders- 
ville, Mass., April 22, 1859, son °f Daniel 
M. and Melissa E. (Simmons) Chase. Mem- 
bers of the Sutton family were among the 
early settlers of what is now Millbury, Mass., 
the portion that was set off from the town of 
Sutton, and in which the family resided for 
several generations. Paul Chase, grandfather 
of Louis E., married Sarah Pierce, of West 
Millbury. They had eight children, of whom 
six grew to maturity, four sons and two daugh- 
ters. George and Lewis died in 1828, aged 
from ten to twelve years. George L., who is 
the president of the Hartford Fire Insurance 
Company, resides in Hartford, Conn. David B. 
resides in West Winsted, Conn. Hannah is 
the wife of Perley B, Whipple, and resides in 
Alton, 111. Paul Chase died in 1870, aged 
seventy-nine; and his widow died in 18S4, 
aged ninety-four, a remarkably well-preserved 
woman to the last. Daniel M. Chase, born 



7° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



July 25, 1832, on the old farm in Millbury, 
was a mechanic and in the same line of busi- 
ness as his son. His wife, Melissa E., was 
a native of Sutton. 

Louis E. Chase, the only child of his par- 
ents, is a graduate of the Millbury High 
School. At the age of twenty he began an 
apprenticeship with his father at the trade of 
shuttle-maker, in which he has since been suc- 
cessfully engaged. Previous to the incorpo- 
ration of the D. T. Dudley & Son Company in 
1894, Mr. Chase worked as a skilled mechanic 
for the firm of D. T. Dudley & Sons. The 
business was established by D. T. Dudley 
over half a century ago. He died in 1896, 
aged seventy-six. Since the incorporation of 
the present firm, Mr. Chase has been at the 
head of the iron work department. He is a 
thoroughly practical man, and his faithful at- 
tendance to business is the secret of his suc- 
cess and the prosperity of the company. 

On September 5, 1883, Mr. Chase was 
united in marriage with Augusta Houghton, 
a daughter of Joel and Julia (Parker) Hough- 
ton, of Sutton, both of whom are now de- 
ceased. The father was a grain dealer and 
miller. They had six children, three sons 
and three daughters, of whom two sons and 
two daughters are living. The union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Chase has been blessed by the birth 
of two sons: Daniel Moody, born May 16, 
1S90; and Wellington Houghton, born May 
24, 1892. The older son is the fifth Daniel 
in ten generations. The family resides in 
Wilkinsonville, in the house which Mr. Chase 
erected in 1S93. While Mr. Chase is a Re- 
publican, he votes for the candidate that in 
his judgment is best fitted for the office. In 
religious belief he is an Episcopalian. His 
father was for many years a warden of the 
church, and he has been its treasurer since 
1880. 



17, 



OHN MARSH WHITE, proprietor of 
theTourtelotte House in Millbury, son 
of Russell and Lydia (Marsh) White, 
was born in Oxford, Mass., December 

1837. This family, which is descended 



from old English stock, were early settlers 



of Rhode Island, and dwelt there for several 
generations. Russell White, born in Rhode 
Island in 1790, was a carpenter by trade, and 
followed that calling throughout the early 
years of his life. His last days were spent 
on his farm of seventy-five acres in Oxford, 
Mass., where he died in 1854. He was twice 
married, successively to Hannah Buffum and 
Lydia Marsh. The latter, born in Dudley, 
Mass., after surviving him nineteen years, 
died in 1873, sixty years of age. He had 
fourteen children, seven by each wife. 

John Marsh White, only son of Russell 
White by the second wife, was sixteen years 
old when his father died. He received a dis- 
trict-school education. When but fourteen 
years old the responsibility of conducting the 
farm devolved upon him.owing to his father's 
poor health. After carrying it on until his 
majority, the property was sold. He began 
his hotel career as a helper in the Regatta 
House, Boston, and was next in the Atlantic 
House, Chelsea Beach, where he was general 
utility man for four years. Following that 
he spent eleven years in Worcester, five years 
as a hack driver and six years in the hack 
and livery business. About the time of his 
marriage he became the owner and landlord of 
the Tourtelotte House, an ancient landmark 
of Millbury. It has been a tavern for one 
hundred years, was known for forty-two years 
of that time as the Tourtelotte House, and 
for twenty-two years it has been under the 
able management of Mr. White. Having 
made a wide reputation as a homelike, com- 
fortable, and well-kept house, it is a favorite 
stopping-place for travellers. Mr. White is 
a model landlord. He has ten horses at the 
present time, all of them of well-bred stock. 
He is also very fond of the chase, and keeps 
eighteen hounds, about half of which are pup- 
pies, having had as many as thirty -five. The 
oldest clog, Logan, seven years old, has taken 
many prizes, including four first and two 
second prizes at one trial. In the bench 
show at North Acton, Logan and his puppies 
took six prizes, four first, one second, and one 
third. It won the American field cup in the 
Brunswick field trial, its record being first for 
speed, first for trailing, first for style, first for 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



73 



barking, second for endurance, and third for 
hunting. He started and killed his fox in an 
hour and forty minutes. He has been the 
fastest fox dog in New England. Mr. White 
paid one hundred and fifty dollars for him in 
Kentucky. 

In the winter of 1876 Mr. White was mar- 
ried to Louisa Tourtelotte, daughter of 
Charles and Sarah (Woodbury) Tourtelotte. 
Mr. Tourtelotte purchased this hotel in 1856, 
and conducted it until his death in 1874. 
Mrs. Tourtelotte has also passed away. Mrs. 
White lost her only sister. She has two 
brothers living, one in Worcester and the 
other in Millbury. Mabel White, a young 
lady of musical ability and the only daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. White, lives at home. 




DN. WILLIAM ROBINSON HILL, 
late an influential and esteemed citi- 
zen of Worcester County, a man of 
rare virtues and graces of character, 
State Senator in 1862-63, was DOrn February 
10, 181 5, in Douglas, Mass., and died Novem- 
ber 19, 1887, at his home in Wilkinsonville, 
town of Sutton, where for forty-eight years he 
had been engaged in business as a merchant, 
and for thirty years had been Postmaster. 
He was a son of Deacon Micah and Sally 
(Marsh) Hill, and was of the eighth genera- 
tion in this country from John Hill, who was 
a Plymouth Colony settler before 1632, be- 
came a member of the Boston Artillery Com- 
pany in 1633, and died in 1664. 

Captain Ephraim Hill, son of Samuel, 
grandson of John Hill, Jr., and great-grand- 
son of John Hill, was the first settled inhabi- 
tant of the town of Douglas, and died there in 
1795, it is said at the age of one hundred and 
seven years; having been born in Sherborn in 
1688. His son Caleb, a native of Medway, 
for thirty years a Deacon of the church at 
Douglas, was father of Lieutenant Moses, 
who married September 20, 1780, Dinah 
Robinson. Deacon Micah Hill was a son of 
this couple. He was born in Douglas, Sep- 
tember 27, 1787, was married to Sally Marsh, 
daughter of Aaron and Sarah (Fuller) Marsh, 
in 1809, an d died June 20, 1836, survived by 



his wife and six sons, the third of whom was 
William R., an account of whose useful and 
beneficent life is here condensed from a 
printed memorial volume. 

He began work at the age of twelve years 
in the store of his uncle, Benjamin Cragin, at 
East Douglas, where he was employed two 
years, but with the privilege of attending 
school during its sessions. In 1829 he was 
for some months in the store of the Manchaug 
Manufacturing Company, and after that he 
held various clerkships at New Worcester, 
Wilkinsonville, and Uxbridge till 1836, 
when he took up his abode at Wilkinsonville, 
being associated in mercantile business with 
James L. Dudley. His partner dying in 
1844, Mr. Hill continued to carry on the busi- 
ness till December, 1884. During the same 
forty-eight years he was book-keeper and pay- 
master for the Sutton Manufacturing Com- 
pany. For the twenty-three years previous to 
his death he was a director of the Grafton Na- 
tional Bank and for the last ten years presi- 
dent of the Millbury Savings Bank. 

A Republican in politics, thoroughly pa- 
triotic and public-spirited, he served in the 
leading town offices, was sent to the State 
legislature in 1861 as a member of the House, 
and in 1862 and 1863 as a Senator. Abstain- 
ing from the use of intoxicants and tobacco, 
he was deeply interested in temperance work, 
and for several years was president of the 
Worcester County (South) Temperance Union. 
He inherited musical talent, which he sedu- 
lously cultivated, for many years giving in- 
struction to singing classes, and serving as 
choir leader and tenor soloist of the West 
Church in Grafton nearly fifty years. His 
musical taste, it is said, was excellent, his 
power of expression unusual. For fourteen 
years he ably discharged the duties of the 
president of the Worcester County Musical 
Association, inaugurating an unprecedented 
career of progress and prosperity. Descended 
from a God-fearing ancestry, reared by pious 
parents, he made a public confession of faith 
in Christ when seventeen years of age, uniting 
with the Congregational church at Uxbridge, 
and ever remained a consistent, prayerful fol- 
lower of the Master, meekly studying the 



74 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



divine word, and liberally devoting his means 
and powers to noble service, a generous giver 
to the cause of religion and all Christian 
benevolence. He was actively interested in 
Sunday-school work, and at two different 
periods served as superintendent. Of the 
Congregational church at Grafton, of which he 
was a member forty-five years, he was at the 
time of his death senior officer. He was ever 
a cordial supporter of home and foreign mis- 
sions, and it was his delight to assist earnest, 
promising young men of slender resources, 
pursuing with difficulty the paths of higher 
learning. 

His business qualities whereby he gained 
such honorable distinction in financial circles 
were even more than equalled by the gentler 
virtues of the Christian character, whose pos- 
session he illustrated no less conspicuously in 
the secular than he did in the religious 
sphere. His motto was strict integrity in all 
the relations of life. He was not simply an 
honest man, he was more. He was as solici- 
tous for the pecuniary good of those with whom 
he dealt as he was for his own interests, fre- 
quently sacrificing, in fact, opportunities for 
legitimate profit to himself in his unselfish 
regard for the interests of others. Home was 
to him the dearest place, and it was in the 
home circle that the graces of the man shone 
brightest. His was an active and well-spent 
life, his energetic spirit leaving no hour un- 
employed; and by patient, persevering indus- 
try, prudence, and good judgment he achieved 
success. Promptness was considered by him 
as one of the cardinal virtues, and his pres- 
ence could always be relied upon at the time" 
appointed. He was very methodical, and al- 
ways met and faithfully discharged every obli- 
gation. He was generous to his opponents, 
considerate of his friends, but in that gener- 
osity and consideration was never known to 
countenance questionable public or private 
action. Willing at all times to counsel with 
those who sought his advice, he never in- 
truded his opinions upon others. To those 
in distress through misfortune he gave gen- 
erously, never refusing an appeal and often 
quietly seeking out those in trouble. "He 
was the soul of honor, his life immaculate in 



its purity, his simple word in commercial cir- 
cles a bond as good as gold." It has been 
well said: "The loss of one who so fully 
realized the ideal of manly worth and Chris- 
tian character is not to be measured in words. 
The eulogy that calls for mental reservation 
or abatement does not belong to him. Con- 
fidently can all who knew him in any degree 
subscribe to the highest estimate of those who 
knew him best." 

Mr. Hill was married May 21, 1839, t0 
Miss Emily B. Wheelock, daughter of Captain 
Francis Wheelock, of Sturbridge. Two of 
the four daughters born of this union — Laura 
A. Fiske and Emily Frances — died in child- 
hood, and two — Caroline Wheelock and Ellen 
Agnes — with their mother survive. Ellen 
Agnes is the wife of Albert L. Fisher, of 
Fisherville, a sketch of whom follows. 



(sjTLBERT LABAN FISHER, Postmas- 
fclA ter and leading merchant at Fisher- 
yJIsV ville, his native place, in the town 
of Grafton, Mass., was born March 
10, 1846, son of Erastus and Mary F. 
(Dresser) Fisher. He completed his educa- 
tion at the high school in Worcester, and at 
twenty-one years of age became a member of 
the well-known manufacturing firm of E. 
Fisher & Sons, and was superintendent of the 
Fisherville Mills till 1876, when he took 
charge of the store, of which he subsequently 
became the owner, having sold his interest in 
the manufacturing business. As a dealer in 
general merchandise he keeps a varied and ex- 
tensive stock, answering to the miscellaneous 
needs of a large community, and employs sev- 
eral clerks. 

He was Selectman of the town in 1885 and 
1886, and was Representative to the General 
Court in 1888, the district that sent him in- 
cluding the towns of Northboro, Berlin, 
Shrewsbury, Westboro, and Grafton. Serv- 
ing on the committee on Prisons, during his 
official term he visited every penal institution 
in the State. Since 1882 he has been Post- 
master at Fisherville, having received his ap- 
pointment from President Arthur. He has 
been a Mason since 1868, and is a member of 




ALBERT L. FISHER 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



75 



Franklin Lodge of Grafton, Tyrian Royal 
Arch Chapter of Mill bury, and Worcester 
Commandery, K. T., of Worcester. He is a 
director of the Grafton National Bank, a trus- 
tee of the Grafton Savings Bank, and a di- 
rector and also one of the Security Committee 
of the Grafton Co-operative Bank, his superior 
financial ability contributing in large measure 
to the prosperity and success of these institu- 
tions. 

He was married November 22, 1871, to 
Ellen A. Hill, daughter of the late Hon. 
William R. Hill, of Sutton, whose biography 
precedes the present sketch. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fisher have one daughter, Carrie Emily. She 
was married October 5, 1892, to Walter L. 
Mellen, of Worcester, a building contractor, 
in partnership with his father, Henry Mellen. 
The two children born of this union are: Al- 
bert Fisher Mellen and his sister, Dorothy 
Mellen. 




OBERT HORACE CHAMBER- 
LAIN, High Sheriff of Worcester 
County and one of the most re- 
spected of Worcester's citizens, 
was born in this city, June 16, 1838. A son 
of Thomas and Hannah (Blair) Chamberlain, 
he is of the sixth generation descended from 
William Chamberlain, who was born in 1620, 
probably in England, and who is known to 
have resided in Woburn from 1653 until his 
death, which occurred in 1706, at the age of 
eighty-six years. This ancestor was one of 
the first settlers of that place. His son, 
Jacob, born in Billerica in 1657, was the 
father of a second Jacob, born in Medford in 
1691, whose son, a third Jacob, born in New- 
town e (now Cambridge) on November 28, 
1 7 19, was the great-grandfather of Sheriff 
Chamberlain. 

Sheriff Chamberlain's grandfather, John 
Chamberlain, who was born in Worcester on 
July 22, 1745, died here in 1813. He mar- 
ried Mary Curtis, who was born here on Octo- 
ber 14, 1747, and died in 1818. She was a 
daughter of Captain John and Elizabeth Cur- 
tis. Both she and her husband are buried in 
Rural Cemetery, Worcester. They were the 



parents of six children — John, Henry, Levi, 
Thomas, Dolly, and Mary. The three first 
named, of these were college graduates. John 
was an able attorney in Albion, N.Y., where 
he died in 1834, at the age of sixty-two. 
Henry, also a lawyer, who settled in Mobile, 
Ala., won distinction on the bench of the Su- 
preme Court in that State, and died in 1855, 
leaving one son. Levi settled in Keene, 
N.H., where he made an enviable name as a 
lawyer. Dolly, who never married, born in 
1792, died in 1885 at the age of ninety-three. 
Mary married Daniel Greenleaf. Thomas 
Chamberlain, who was born on March 6, 
1783, was twice married. His first wife, in 
maidenhood Nancy Woods, was a native of 
Groton. She died in 1831, having been the 
mother of eight children, four sons and four 
daughters, all of whom grew to maturity. His 
second marriage was contracted in 1833 with 
Hannah Blair, of Worcester, a daughter of 
Captain Robert and Elizabeth Blair. The 
children of this union were: Dolly Curtis 
Chamberlain, who died in 1872, at the age of 
thirty-nine; Thomas, born in 1835, wno is 
now in the State National Bank of Boston; 
and Robert H. Chamberlain, the subject of 
this biography. 

Robert Horace Chamberlain's education 
was obtained in the public schools of Worces- 
ter and at Westfield Academy. In August, 
1862, he enlisted as a volunteer in Company 
A of the Fifty-first Regiment, Massachusetts 
Infantry, under Captain Edwin A. Wood. 
After a year's active service in the North 
Carolina campaign he returned to Worces- 
ter, raised Company F for the Sixtieth 
Massachusetts Regiment, and went back to 
the front as its Captain. He was subse- 
quently in Indianapolis, where there were 
some five thousand prisoners. After return- 
ing home he recruited a militia company, of 
which he was first Captain, then Major at 
the end of a year, and Colonel at the end of 
two years. On December 31, 1868, he was 
made Brigadier-general, which command he 
held for seven years. Since 1876 he has not 
been connected with the militia. 

In politics General Chamberlain is a Repub- 
lican. For two years he occupied a seat in 



7 6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Common Council, and for eighteen years 
he was superintendent of the sewer depart- 
ment. His first election to the office of 
Sheriff occurred in 1892, and in 1895 he was 
re-elected for a term of three years. A 
thirty-second degree Mason, he is a Past 
Commander of the local Knights Templar, 
and in 1892 he was Grand Commander of the 
Knights Templar of Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island. He is also a member of the Loyal 
Legion, of the Hancock Social Club, and of 
the G. A. R. For three years he was the 
president of the Mechanics' Association. In 
religious faith he is a Congregationalist, and 
he is a member and trustee of Union Congre- 
gational Church in Worcester. On January 
10, 1865, he was married to Esther Browning, 
of Hubbardston, Mass. His children are: 
Flora, the wife of Charles B. Wetherby, of 
this city; and Mabel Susan, who is a teacher 
in the public schools of the city. Both 
daughters are graduates of the Worcester Nor- 
mal School. 



tLBERT E. SMITH, the chairman of 
Leicester's Board of Selectmen and 
an extensive woollen manufacturer 
s — ' in Cherry Valley, was born Octo- 
ber 10, 1844, in Blackstone, Worcester 
County, son of Channing Smith. Cbanning 
Smith, who was a native of Killingly, Conn., 
learned the trade of a dyer, and spent his 
active career in the town of Blackstone, 
Mass., where he was for half a century one of 
the leading men. A man of superior intelli- 
gence, he was a warm supporter of Garrison, 
Phillips, and other opponents of slavery. 
With bis able coadjutor, Caleb Thayer, of 
Blackstone, the father of the late Judge Adin 
Thayer, of Worcester, he assisted many a poor 
slave to a place of safety. He served his 
town in the various local offices, and in 1863 
represented his district at the General Court, 
where he was a supporter of Charles Sumner 
for United States Senator. He was an expert 
dyer, especially skilled in the use of indigo 
blue, having a reputation in that line that ex- 
tended throughout the United States. He 
was selected to dye the cloth from which a 



suit of clothes presented to Henry Clay was 
made. He also dyed the cloth of which were 
made the clothes worn by William Henry 
Harrison at his inauguration as President. 
His death occurred in Blackstone in 1878. 
He married Eliza Beebe, who was born in 
Salem, Mass. She was a daughter of William 
and Grace (Claghorn) Beebe and a grand- 
daughter of Colonel George Claghorn. The 
latter served in the Revolution, first as a pri- 
vate at the battle of Bunker Hill, where he 
was wounded, and afterward successively as 
First Lieutenant, Major, and Colonel. In 
1794, when Congress passed an act to provide 
a "naval armament," Colonel Claghorn, as 
naval constructor and contractor, was given 
the charge of building the frigate "Constitu- 
tion," the work being done at Ballard & 
Hart's yard in Boston, under his supervision, 
with Edmund Hart as master mechanic. 

Albert E. Smith left the district school of 
Blackstone when a boy of twelve years, to 
begin work in a woollen-mill. Two years 
later he went into the dye-house to learn the 
trade of a dyer. There he manifested such 
skill in the work that at the age of sixteen 
he was intrusted with the charge of the dye- 
ing department of one of the large woollen- 
mills of his native town. When but eighteen 
years old he accepted an offer of eighteen hun- 
dred dollars per annum as superintendent of 
the dyeing department of the Millville Manu- 
facturing Company at Millville, Mass., where 
he remained two years. He subsequently 
spent a short time in a wool store in New 
York City, whence in 1S65 he came to 
Cherry Valley as superintendent of the wool- 
len-mill of G. N. & J. A. Smith, at the same 
time having an interest in the business. 
During the eleven years in which he was thus 
employed, the business increased rapidly. 
Since 1876, when he bought out the other 
stockholders, he has continued the original 
work of manufacturing woollen goods with 
undisputed success. 

Mr. Smith is one of the leading politicians 
of Leicester, and exerts a good influence in 
town and county affairs. He has given effi- 
cient service as a member of the School Com- 
mittee, Overseer of the Poor, and Selectman, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



77 



and has been largely instrumental in having 
five miles of macadamized State road built 
in Leicester. In June, 1896, he represented 
the Third Congressional District of the Bay 
State in the national Republican convention, 
and had the honor of being the only Massa- 
chusetts delegate that voted for the nomina- 
tion of McKinley as the Presidential candi- 
date. On September 10, 1867, Mr. Smith 
married Miss Anjeanette, daughter of John 
and Adaline (Smith) Kenney, of Douglas, 
Mass. Their children are: Channing, now 
the proprietor of the Valley Woollen Mills at 
Cherry Valley and the treasurer and manager 
of the Chapell Mills Manufacturing Company 
in the same place; and Edith K., the wife of 
Guy C. Whidden, of Worcester, Mass. 



QoTRGEL JACQUES, a successful con- 
/ I tractor and builder and one of the 
t^_ 1 most prominent French Canadian 

citizens of Worcester, was born in 
Contrecceur, P.O., April 28, 1849, son of 
Colonel Oliver and Mary Emerance (Desma- 
rais) Jacques. His parents were natives of 
Canada and descendants of French pioneers. 
The father, born in August, 181 5, who be- 
came a soldier in the British service and rose 
to the rank of Colonel, owned and cultivated 
a farm. The first death in the family, which 
occupied one house for fifty-two years, was 
that of the father, who passed away August 
13, 1897. The mother, although eighty- 
three years old, is remarkably bright and 
active. 

Urgel Jacques attended the common schools 
until he was thirteen years old, and assisted 
his father in farming until sixteen. He then 
entered upon his apprenticeship at the carpen- 
ter's trade, under an agreement by which he 
was to receive six dollars for his services in 
the first year, twelve dollars for those of the 
second, and twenty-four for those of the third. 
However, at the end of the second year he 
paid fifty dollars for his release, or eight 
dollars more than he would have got for 
the three years. On July 21, 1869, young 
Jacques arrived in Worcester, where all were 
strangers to him. For a time he was em- 



ployed here by a man named Johnson, from 
whom he never received his pay. Then, after 
travelling about for a year, he worked for 
Norcross Brothers some two years, and for 
the succeeding ten years was in the employ 
of H. W. Eddy, acting as foreman for eight 
years of that period. In April, 1882, he 
engaged in business for himself. Having 
begun on a limited scale, the business now 
demands the employment of one hundred 
and twenty-five men. His first contract of 
importance was the railroad building on Front 
Street, five stories high. He also built the 
Swedish Lutheran Church, the Brideside 
Block on King Street, the Sugden business 
block in Spencer, the Winslow Skate Manu- 
factory, the Winslow residence, and several 
other dwellings, the Nikerson Block at Leo- 
minster Centre; and he has completed con- 
tracts in Boston and in the State of New 
Hampshire. Besides his residence at 4 Wall 
Street, which he erected in 1884, he owns 
four houses of three tenements each and a 
building on Grafton Street containing two 
stores. 

On February 12, 1872, Mr. Jacques was 
united in marriage with Mary Eveline Chan- 
donnet, of St. John, Deschaillon, P.Q. Mrs. 
Jacques has been the mother of nineteen chil- 
dren, five of whom are living, namely: 
L. D. O. Jacques, M.D., now of Brattleboro, 
Vt., who completed his early education in 
Ottawa, and pursued his medical studies at 
the Laval University, Quebec; Mary Evelyn 
Corrinne, who acquired a convent and busi- 
ness education, kept her father's books for 
four years, and is now a member of a religious 
order, under the name of Sister Mary St. 
Adrien; Joseph H. U. Jacques, who pursued a 
commercial course at the Ottawa University, 
is a good mechanic and architect, and works 
for his father; Mary Erminie Anna, who was 
graduated from Hinman's Business College in 
stenography, typewriting, and hook-keeping; 
and Mary Alexina, who was the sixteenth- 
born, and is now nine years old. Mr. Jacques 
is a member of the Board of Trade, and for 
eight years has been a director of the Equity 
Co-operative Bank. He is a member and a 
trustee of the Benevolent Order of Elks, and 



78 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



belongs to the Agricultural Society, the Me- 
chanics' Association, the St. Jean Baptiste 
Society, the Ward Three French Naturaliza- 
tion Club, and several other organizations. 
The family attend St. Joseph's Roman Catho- 
lic Church. 




TLAS H. BIGELOW, a leading 
farmer of North Brookfield, was 
born here, November 6, 1 82 1. A 
son of John and Betsey (Maynard) 
Bigelow, he is of the fourth generation de- 
scended from Deacon Jason Bigelow, who 
was the founder of the family in this district. 
His earlier ancestors were English. Deacon 
Jason came here from Marlboro in 1737, 
settling on the farm which has ever since 
been owned in the family. One of the 
founders and a leading member of the First 
Congregational Church, he was widely known 
in the denomination as Deacon Bigelow. 
His son Jason was born after the family 
came to North Brookfield. John Bigelow, 
also born here, was a farmer and a highly re- 
spected man in the town. He served his fel- 
low-townsmen as Assessor, was Selectman 
for two years, and in the early thirties repre- 
sented the town in the General Court. His 
death occurred on October 34, 1872. His 
wife, Betsey, was a native of Hubbardston, 
Mass. Of the children born to them, three 
are living, namely: John S., who is in Marl- 
boro; Silas H., the subject of this sketch; 
and Sumner S., who resides in North Brook- 
field. 

Silas H. Bigelow has always made his home 
in his native town, and has been a lifelong 
farmer. His estate embraces over a hundred 
acres of land, all in an excellent state of cul- 
tivation. For the last quarter of a century he 
has carried on a milk business, having a milk 
route in the village. Formerly he dealt in 
wood, buying the standing timber and cut- 
ting it for sales. Although he has been 
warmly interested in town affairs, he has not 
cared to be an office-holder, preferring a life 
free from public duties. However, for a num- 
ber of years he was Assessor for the town. 
In politics he is a Democrat. While he is 



not a member of any church body, he contrib- 
utes liberally to the support of religious work, 
Mr. Bigelow was married in 1845, April 
29, to Clarissa A. Cole, who was born in 
Shutesbury, daughter of Reuben and Abigail 
Cole, of that town. Mrs. Bigelow, who was 
devoted to her home and family and a most 
lovable woman, died on June 15, 1897, after 
more than a half-century of wedded life. Of 
her eight children, four are living. These 
are: Mary A., who is the wife of George A. 
Jenks; Abbie H., the wife of Martin L. 
Crawford, of Spencer; Jane M. ; and Warren. 



rwyc 



EORGE A. BROWN, M.D., super- 
\ (5T intendent of the School for Feeble- 
^— ^ minded Youth at Barre, Worcester 
County, Mass., was born in this town, April 
18, 1858, son of Dr. George and Catherine 
(Wood) Brown. He is a descendant in the 
eighth generation of Thomas and Bridget 
Brown, who arrived from England and settled 
in Concord, Mass., in 1638. Thomas Brown 
died November 3, 1688. From him the line 
continues through Thomas, second, born in 
Concord in 1651, Ephraim, born April 21, 
1689, Thomas, third, born December 26, 
1720, and Jonas, born December 15, 1752, 
to Ephraim Brown, Dr. Brown's grandfather, 
born in Temple, N. H., July 13, 1790. 

Ephraim Brown settled in Wilton, N. H., 
where he followed the carpenter's trade in 
connection with farming. He had much me- 
chanical ingenuity, and in 1838 he invented 
a threshing machine, which much resembles 
those in use at the present time. He was one 
of the most prominent men of Wilton in his 
day, taking an active interest in all matters of 
public importance. He was a member of the 
Unitarian church. Politically, he was a 
Whig. He died in Wilton, December n, 
1840. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Sarah King, was born in Wilton, November 
9, 1797. She died in 1887, aged ninety 
years. Their children were: Sarah M., who 
was born November 7, 181 7, and died Decem- 
ber 2, 1 8 18; Ephraim, Jr., born October 1, 
1819, now living in Lowell, Mass. ; Abigail 
K., born December 9, 1821, who died Decern- 




GEORGE A. BROWN 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



81 



ber 29, 1824; Dr. George Brown, above 
named, who was born in Wilton, N.H., Octo- 
ber 11, 1823, and who died at Barre, May 6, 
1892; Sumner, born September 5, 1825, who 
died October 30, 1827; Abigail M., born 
July 28, 1828, died July 17, 1852; Diantha 
B. , born February 1, 1831, now residing in 
Barre; and Erastus, born March 5, 1834, who 
is no longer living. • 

Dr. George Brown, father of the present 
Dr. Brown of Barre, was fitted for college at 
Phillips Academy, Andover; was graduated 
from Burlington College, Vt. ; began the 
study of medicine with Dr. Norman Smith, of 
Groton, Mass. ; matriculated at the Jefferson 
Medical College, Philadelphia; and was grad- 
uated from the medical department of the 
University of New York. In 1850 he located 
himself for practice in Barre, and the follow- 
ing year became so deeply interested in a pri- 
vate school for feeble-minded youth, then re- 
cently established by Dr. Hervey Wilbur, 
that he decided to take upon himself the pro- 
prietorship and superintendency, which from 
that time forward constituted his life work. 
New quarters were soon provided, a splendid 
estate of two hundred and fifty acres, situated 
at an altitude of one thousand feet above sea 
level, being utilized for the purpose; and by 
the inauguration of a system of manual and 
mental training, conceived by the philan- 
thropic physician and his intellectual wife, 
who became equally devoted to the cause, this 
retreat rose from a small beginning to be the 
largest private institution of its kind in the 
United States. Aside from the care of the 
school the Doctor was actively interested in 
the welfare and prosperity of the town and its 
public institutions, taking the necessary meas- 
ures for the planting of trees in the parks, and 
otherwise beautifying its surroundings. 

He was one of the founders of the library 
and of the Glen Valley Cemetery Association, 
being president of the former until his death; 
and all other movements instigated for the 
benefit of the general community were sure of 
receiving his hearty co-operation and support. 
He was especially devoted to educational mat- 
ters, and for a number of years rendered valu- 
able assistance to the town as a member of the 



School Board. He was for years one of the 
leading members of the Congregational 
church, and contributed liberally toward its 
support. Originally a Whig in politics, he 
joined the ranks of the Republican party at its 
formation. 

On November 1, 1850, he married Catharine 
Wood, born in Groton, June 13, 1827, daugh- 
ter of Artemas and Susan (Barber) Wood. 
Madam Catharine W. Brown, who for the past 
forty years has labored diligently for the wel- 
fare of the feeble-minded children under her 
charge, is a descendant of William Wood, an 
Englishman, who settled in Concord, Mass., 
in 1638, and died there in 167 1. Her ances- 
try is traced through William's son Michael, 
who died in 1674, Michael's son John, who 
died January 3, 1729, John Wood, second, 
who was born September 13, 1680, and died 
July 12, 1746, and his son, Ensign John 
Wood, born March 1, 17 16, who died in 
Mason, N. H., December 12, 1785, to Colonel 
James Wood, her grandfather, an officer in the 
New Hampshire militia, who was born No- 
vember 4, 1755, and died July 31, 1831. 
Artemas Wood, Madam Brown's father, was 
born in Mason, N.H., August 9, 1791. Set- 
tling in Groton, Mass., he was for many years 
engaged in mercantile business, and later be- 
came a trusted official of the Worcester & 
Nashua Railroad Company, acting as station 
agent for some time. He married Susan 
Barber, and became the father of seven chil- 
dren, namely: Artemas, Jr.; Emily; Eliza- 
beth; Samuel P.; Catharine, now Madam 
Brown; Jonathan A.; and Marcella. Mr. 
Artemas Wood died June 30, 1866. The late 
Dr. George Brown left one son, George A., 
the subject of this sketch. 

George A. Brown pursued his preparatory 
studies at Phillips Academy, Andover, was 
graduated from Yale in the class of 1880 and 
from the College of Physicians. and Surgeons, 
New York City, in 1883. He has also taken 
supplementary courses in nervous diseases. 
Since 1883 he has been closely identified with 
the School for Feeble-minded, becoming its 
official head after his father's death. He 
gives his entire time to its management, earn- 
estly striving to improve the system, which he 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



has succeeded in a great measure in accom- 
plishing. There are at the present time 
seventy pupils under his charge. Dr. Brown 
is a member of the State and County Medical 
Societies, the Brookfield Medical Club, and 
the New England Psychological Club, and is 
president of the Association of Superintend- 
ents of Schools for Feeble-minded Youth. 
He is actively concerned in matters of public 
interest, being president of the Library Asso- 
ciation; vice-president and treasurer of the 
Glen Valley Cemetery Association; president 
of and the largest stockholder in the Barre 
Water Works, which he was mainly instru- 
mental in establishing; and the vice-president 
of the Village Improvement Society, organ- 
ized for increasing and maintaining the at- 
tractiveness of the town. 

On May 18, 1887, Dr. Brown was united in 
marriage with Susan E. Barnum, born in 
Bethel, Conn., daughter of Edmund R. and 
Maria (Durant) Barnum. Dr. and Mrs. 
Brown have three children living, namely: 
George P., born April 17, 1888; Catharine 
D., born September 17, 1889; Donald R., 
born April 13, 1895. A daughter, Susan, 
born January 7, 1898, died same day. 

In politics the Doctor is a Republican with 
independent proclivities. He has been 
chosen a delegate to several State and county 
conventions. He has been clerk of the Con- 
gregational society since 1886, and he and 
Mrs. Brown are members of that church. 



T^JDWARD H. TAFT, a representative 
PI farmer and dairyman of Mendon, was 
'^ , " born in this town, July 1, 1830, son 
of Leonard and Martha (Comstock) Taft. He 
is a descendant in the eighth generation of 
Robert Taft, said to have been of ancient 
Scotch lineage, who, with his wife, Sarah, 
and several children born in England, settled 
near Chipmuc Pond, Mendon, in 1679 or 
1680. The descendants of Robert Taft were 
prolific, and reared large families. 

Leonard Taft, the father, was a wheelwright 
by trade, which he followed in connection 
with farming, and was favorably known 
throughout this locality. In politics he was 



a Democrat of the Jackson type, and he served 
as a Selectman, Overseer of the Poor, and in 
other town offices. He married Martha Com- 
stock, a native of Rhode Island, who became 
the mother of seven children, namely: Ebene- 
zer, who was a farmer of Mendon, and died 
some years since ; Putnam W., who for more 
than a generation was a well-known school 
teacher; Hannah, who married Collins Gas- 
kill, and had two sons — ■ Leonard and Edwin 
— both of whom served in the Civil War, 
Edwin having died from wounds received in 
battle; Enos, who is a graduate of Yale Col- 
lege and Law School, and has been a lawyer 
in New York City for many years; Leonard 
A., who was a school teacher and a theologi- 
cal student, and died of consumption at an 
early age; Edward H., the subject of this 
sketch; and Martha A. Thayer, lately de- 
ceased, who was a widow in Auburn, Mass., 
and the mother of two sons, Andrew and Web- 
ster Thayer. 

Having been educated in the schools of 
Mendon, Edward H. Taft worked in the 
shoe factories of this town and Northbridge 
for a few years. He then turned his atten- 
tion to agriculture, and later bought the Gibbs 
Davenport place, on which he has since re- 
sided. Besides raising the usual crops, he 
keeps a dairy, from which a large number of 
regular customers in Milford are supplied 
with milk. His farm is said to be one of the 
best equipped in this section. He is also 
quite extensively engaged in the wood and 
lumber business. Politically, he has sup- 
ported the Prohibition party since its organi- 
zation, and has been its candidate for both the 
State Senate and House of Representatives. 

Mr. Taft first married Joanna W. Bennett, 
of Northbridge. She had eight children, 
namely: Robert B., who died at the age of ten 
years; Martha, who died aged two years; 
Mary L., who married Frank Haywood, of 
Northbridge; George L., who married Annie 
Woodward, and lives in Mendon; Leonard E., 
who married Minnie Wilson, of Milford, and 
has five children; Robert B. , second, who 
lives in Rhode Island; Florence, who is the 
wife of Frank M. Aklrich, of Mendon; and 
Jomna Grace, who married Freeman Lowell, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



83 



of Mendon. A second marriage in 1891 
united Mr. Taft with Serena E. Eames, of 
Upton, who gave birth to Edward Eames Taft 
on September 5, 1892, and died March 25, 
1894. On June 28, 1896, he contracted a 
third marriage with Mrs. Helen E. Deland. 
Mr. Taft is personally identified with the In- 
dependent Order of Good Templars; is chap- 
lain of the Mendon Grange, Patrons of Hus- 
bandry; is a member of the Historical Fra- 
ternity, a society of considerable antiquity; 
and of an organization which has for its aim 
the detection of horse thieves. He is an 
active member of the Unitarian church, and 
has served upon the Parish Committee for 
many years. 




"ENRY C. BATCHELLER, Town 
Clerk of Sutton and an ex-member 
of the Massachusetts legislature, 
was born here, September 5, 1828, 
son of Lewis and Sophia (Newton) Batcheller. 
His immigrant ancestor was Joseph Batchel- 
ler, who settled in Salem, Mass. ; and the 
first of the family to locate in Sutton was his 
great-grandfather, Abraham Batcheller, who 
marched to Concord as the Corporal of a com- 
pany of minute-men from this locality. The 
grandfather, Benjamin Batcheller, who was in 
early life a school teacher and later a well-to- 
do farmer, served with ability as a member of 
the Board of Selectmen and in other town 
offices. Lewis Batcheller, the father, a life- 
long resident of Sutton, died a comparatively 
young man. 

After completing the course of the public 
schools in his native town, Henry C. Batch- 
eller attended the academies at Warren and 
Groton, paying for his tuition in both with 
funds he had earned by working in a machine 
shop. When a young man he entered into 
partnership with his brother for the purpose 
of engaging in the manufacture of shoes at 
the time when Sutton was noted for the ex- 
cellence of its hand-made footwear. For some 
years H. C. Batcheller & Co. made a specialty 
of heavy goods, which were placed upon the 
market through Boston and New York com- 
mission houses. He subsequently removed to 



Wayland, Mass., and was there in the same 
business for seven years. In 1862 he and 
a partner contracted with the authorities of 
Baltimore, Md., for the labor of the inmates 
of the House of Refuge in that city, a trans- 
action that proved so successful as to induce 
him to remain there for the next ten years. 
Returning then to Sutton Centre, he engaged 
in the manufacture of slippers, and has since 
conducted a profitable business in that line. 

Mr. Batcheller contracted the first of his 
two marriages with Theresa D. Little, a 
daughter of Luther and Fanny H, (Dunbar) 
Little. His children by this union are: 
William H. Batcheller, a resident of Mill- 
bury, who is married and has two children — 
Floyd N. and Caryl L. ; and Alice Theresa, 
who is the wife of Charles E. Lowe, and re- 
sides in Wilkinsonville. His second mar- 
riage was made with Mary A. Holmes. A 
daughter of Warren and Ann (Gay) Holmes, 
she is a great-grand-daughter of Deborah Samp- 
son, who acquired notoriety by assuming male 
attire, and serving as a soldier in the Ameri- 
can army during the Revolutionary War. In 
politics Mr. Batcheller is a Democrat, but 
not a partisan. He rendered efficient service 
to the town as a Selectman during the years 
1884, 1885, and 1886; was a member of the 
legislative Committee on Labor while serving 
in the lower house in 1891 ; and of the Agri- 
cultural Committee in 1892. For the past 
eight years he has been Town Clerk. He 
belongs to Maryland Commandery, Knights 
Templar; and to Sutton Grange, No. 109, 
Patrons of Husbandry; and he attends the 
Congregational church. 




iEWIS F. STRATTON, a general mer- 
chant of Northboro, Mass., was born 
January 5, 1845, in South Lan- 
caster, Worcester County, son of 
George and Lucinda (Bailey) Stratton. The 
father was a well-known business man of Lan- 
caster, where he was for many years engaged 
in the manufacture of copper pumps. 

When he was sixteen years old, L. F. 
Stratton had obtained in the public schools 
of Lancaster a practical education that well 



84 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



fitted him for his future career in the busi- 
ness world. On November 16, 1 86 1, he 
went to Boston to learn the hardware business, 
and for the ensuing ten years was in the em- 
ploy of Carter, Stratton & Co. Returning 
then to the home of his boyhood, he remained 
a short time, and then bought out a grocery 
store in Concord, N.H., where he stayed 
two years. Removing then to Boston, he was 
engaged for four years in the hardware busi- 
ness in that city in company with his brother, 
H. O. Stratton. During that time he was 
also the manager of his father's pump manu- 
facturing interests. In 1886 he retired from 
the hardware trade, and, coming to North- 
boro, purchased his present store, which is 
the old Samuel Wood stand. Here by his 
enterprise and business tact he has built up 
an extensive and constantly increasing trade 
in general merchandise, of which he carries 
a complete stock, employing a force of five 
men. 

Mr. Stratton is an Independent in politics, 
voting according to his convictions, regardless 
of party restrictions. He uniformly declines 
town office, preferring to devote his time to 
his business affairs, although he has served 
four years on the School Committee, and is 
one of the trustees of the Gale fund. On 
June 25, 1S90, he married Miss Harriet 
Valentine, daughter of George Valentine, of 
Northboro. 




ILLIAM E. HAYWARD, an en- 
terprising woollen manufacturer in 
Uxbridge and an ex-member of the 
legislature, was born in Mendon, Mass., July 
19, 1839. A son of Ebenezer W. and Susan 
H. (Burbeck) Hayward, he is of English 
origin, his immigrant ancestor having arrived 
in Massachusetts at an early date. The 
grandfather, Eben Hayward, who was a native 
of Braintree, Mass., married Deborah White. 
Hayward Place in Boston was so named in 
honor of one of Eben's sons, who was a phy- 
sician of note in that city. 

Ebenezer W. Hayward was born in Brain- 
tree in 1798. In early life he engaged in the 
dry-goods business in Boston. Later he be- 



came officially connected with a bank in Men- 
don. After coming to Uxbridge in 1836 as 
chief official of what was then a State bank, 
he continued in that capacity until his death, 
which occurred in 1875. He was an influen- 
tial member of the Unitarian church. His 
wife, Susan H., was a daughter of Thomas 
Burbeck, of Boston, who served as an officer 
in the American army during the Revolution- 
ary War, and a niece of George Henry Bur- 
beck, who was in command at the fort in 
New London, Conn., for some time. Eben- 
ezer and Susan H. Hayward were the parents 
of six children, four of whom are living, 
namely: Lucinda, a resident of Uxbridge; 
Eben B. , who resides here, and is engaged in 
the boot and shoe business in Worcester; 
Ellen M., who married the Rev. Charles B. 
Ferry, late of Northampton, Mass., and is 
now residing in Newton, Mass.; and William 
E. , the subject of this sketch. 

William E. Hayward was educated in the 
common schools of Uxbridge, including the 
high school. At the age of eighteen he en- 
tered the Blackstone Bank as a clerk, and 
afterward remained there in that capacity for 
ten years. He next acquired an interest in 
the Capron Woollen Mills, which for the suc- 
ceeding thirteen years were operated by the 
firm Capron & Hayward, chiefly producing 
satinet. In 1872 he became interested in an 
enterprise at Proctorsville, Vt., under the 
style of Hayward, Taft & Co., who manufact- 
ured woollen goods for men's wear. This con- 
nection had lasted about twelve years when 
he sold out to his partners. In 1881 he pur- 
chased a mill at East Douglas, Mass., and 
afterward conducted it in association with 
Moses Taft until 1890. Then he bought the 
interests of his partner, and, admitting W. S. 
Schuster to partnership, formed the present 
firm W. E. Hayward & Co., which has largely 
increased the facilities for production. He 
has been the president of the Blackstone Na- 
tional Bank since 1892, and he is a director 
of both the Uxbridge Savings Bank and the 
Blackstone Valley Co-operative Creamery. 

In 1864 Mr. Hayward contracted the first 
of his three marriages with Susan H. Taft, 
a daughter of Moses and Sylvia (Wheelock) 




WILLIAM E. HAYWARD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



87 



Taft. She died in 1878, leaving three chil- 
dren: Harry T., born in September, 1867, 
who is now in the woollen manufacturing 
business at Franklin, Mass.; Sylvia W. , born 
November 18, 1870; and Mary B. , born in 
February, 1872. His, second marriage, per- 
formed in June, 1879, united him with Dora 
Lovett, a daughter of Samuel P. and Sarah A. 
Lovett. She died in January, 1883, leaving 
one son, William Z., born December 25, 
1882. Mr. Hayward's present wife, whom he 
married in 1886, was in maidenhood Eliza- 
beth C. Capen, of Stoughton, Mass. In poli- 
tics Mr. Hayward is a Republican. He is 
serving the public on the Sinking Fund Com- 
mittee. In 1892 he was a member of the 
House of Representatives, serving in the 
Committee on Banks and Banking. His busi- 
ness ability and progressive tendencies are of 
much value to the town, and he is held in 
high estimation. He is a member of the 
Unitarian Society. 



TJdWARD THOMAS GILMORE, one 
P of the Board of Assessors in Westboro, 
"^"* " Worcester County, was born in 
Greenwich, Mass., August 25, 1836, the eld- 
est son of Thomas Smith Gilmore and grand- 
son of Robert and Betsey, or Elizabeth, (Fay) 
Gilmore. On his mother's side he is grand- 
son of Eber Willard and Elizabeth (Powers) 
Bailey. 

His father spent the larger half of his life 
in the town of Greenwich, where he con- 
ducted extensive farming operations for many 
years. A man of sound judgment, firm in his 
decisions, and skilful in business transac- 
tions, he was often chosen to responsible pub- 
lic positions, and served in that town on dif- 
ferent occasions as Selectman, Overseer of the 
Poor, Highway Surveyor, etc. In 1866 he 
moved to Westboro, Mass., and here contin- 
ued the pursuit of agriculture successfully 
until his death, at the age of seventy-four, 
March 30, 18S3. He married Eliza Adeline 
Bailey, a descendant of the Powers family, 
who were among the original settlers of the 
old town of Greenwich, and they had seven 
children, as follows: Edward Thomas; Eliza- 



beth Adeline, now living in Florida; Mary 
Frances, wife of D. Guilford Groundwater, of 
Cottonwood Falls, Chase County, Kan.; 
Stephen Albert, an extensive brick manufact- 
urer of Westboro ; Henry Augustine and Her- 
vey Augustus, twins, the former of whom is 
an auctioneer and cattle inspector in West- 
boro and the latter a skilful farmer in this 
town and also a cattle dealer at the Brighton 
market; and Myron Walton, owner of a cattle 
ranch in Elmdale, Kan. 

Edward T. Gilmore received his early train- 
ing in the common and high schools of his 
native town, and fitted for the Sophomore year 
in college at the New Salem Academy. He 
subsequently taught in village and district 
schools four years, having on an average sixty 
pupils each term. As in all schools of those 
days, he had classes of all grades, ranging 
from the lowest in the primary department to 
those in the high school. Going then to 
Springfield, he was employed during the war 
in the United States Armory, in the gun- 
stock turning department. At the close of 
the Rebellion he, in company with three asso- 
ciates, engaged in the oyster business, both as 
a planter and dealer, having two depots in 
Springfield, one in Westfield, and one, the 
headquarters for opening and shipping, in 
Fair Haven, Conn. 

In this industry he carried on an extensive 
business, employing many vessels in the busi- 
ness of dredging for oysters in Chesapeake 
Bay and adjacent waters, and planting them 
in New Haven Harbor, also employing a 
large number of hands, and handling many 
hundred gallons of oysters daily. 

In 1870 the partnership was dissolved, and 
the ensuing two years Mr. Gilmore was en- 
gaged as a commission merchant in New York 
City. Coming to Westboro in 1872, he began 
the manufacture of spring beds, which he car- 
ried on with his brothers six years, when he 
bought out his partners, and to the original 
business added the manufacture of finish 
lumber and boxes, which he conducted suc- 
cessfully eight years. 

In 1889, at the earnest solicitation of his 
fellow-citizens, he accepted a position on the 
Water Board, which he retained five years, 



88 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



three years of this time being superintendent 
of the water system. He is now serving his 
third term on the Board of Assessors of West- 
boro, and since 1891 has been a member of 
the Republican Town Committee. He is 
thoroughly conversant with local political 
affairs, and has served his party as a delegate 
to various senatorial, county, and legislative 
conventions. 

On January 3, 1865, Mr. Gilmore was mar- 
ried at Hinsdale, N.H., to Mary Melissa 
Harris, of Vernon, Vt., the "Gretna Green" 
of New England. She was born March 1, 
1836, daughter of Austin and Polly (Clark) 
Harris, grand-daughter of Ziba and Polly 
(Lee) Harris, and great-grand-daughter of 
Sylvanus and Mary (Pond) Harris, and on her 
mother's side grand-daughter of Samuel and 
Lydia (Hall) Clark. Her great-grandfather 
Clark fought in the Revolutionary War. She 
had one brother, Austin Almeran Harris, who 
was a private in Company F, First Vermont 
Cavalry, and died in camp at Burlington, Vt. , 
December 1, 1861. 

Three daughters have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Gilmore, namely: Gertrude, born Octo- 
ber 3, 1865, in Springfield, Mass., who died 
January 31, 1867; Maude Adeline and Alice 
Clark, both of whom are successful teachers in 
the public schools of Westboro, having taught 
since their graduation from its high school. 



'AMES C. BEMIS, the agent of the 
Boston & Albany Railroad at Cold- 
brook Springs, was born in Paxton, 
Mass., February 18, 1824, son of Al- 
pheus and Polly (Prouty) Bemis. The grand- 
father, Abijah Bemis, was an early settler in 
Paxton. Alpheus Bemis, who was born in 
Paxton, January 17, 1784, spent the active 
period of his life in the cultivation of a farm 
adjoining his father's property, and died Au- 
gust 28, 1858. He was not a member of any 
religious denomination, and in politics he 
acted with the Democratic party. Polly 
Bemis, his wife, whom he married August 12, 
1805, was born in Spencer, Mass., December 
9, 1789. She became the mother of nine 
children, three of whom are living, namely: 



Hiram P., born July 10, 1818, residing in 
Paxton; James C. , the subject of this sketch; 
and Mary R., born August 25, 1826, residing 
in North Brookfield, Mass. The others were: 
Delia, born August 14, 1809, who died April 
4, 1820; Roxy, born October 13, 181 1, who 
died November 7 of the same year; Roswell, 
born June 9, 181 3, who died September 4, 
1893; and Alpheus, born May 6, 1821, who 
died December 16, 1895. The mother passed 
away August 25, 1866. 

James C. Bemis was educated in the schools 
of Paxton and Spencer. At the age of sixteen 
he began to learn the shoemaker's trade, and, 
locating in the village of Coldbrook Springs 
in 1841, followed that calling here for about 
twenty years. Soon after his arrival he also 
engaged in the hotel business as the' proprie- 
tor of the Coldbrook Springs House, which he 
carried on successfully until it was destroyed 
by fire in 1885. Immediately after the disas- 
ter he erected the present hostelry, which is 
now managed by his son. In December, 
1873, he entered upon his duties as the local 
agent of the Boston & Albany Railroad Com- 
pany, a position that he has efficiently filled 
up to the present time. 

On April 30, 1846, Mr. Bemis was joined 
in marriage with Mary B. Washburn, a daugh- 
ter of Levi and Abigail Washburn, born in 
Gill, Franklin County, Mass., December 3, 
1825. She has had five children, namely: 
Herbert E., born September 25, 1859, who 
died at the age of seven months; Francene 
R. , now the wife of M. C. Needham, of Cold- 
brook Springs; Mary J., now residing in 
Hardwick, Mass.; Ida M., now the wife of 
C. H. Parker, an enterprising merchant of this 
village; and James W. Bemis, who is now the 
proprietor of the Springs House. Mary J., 
first married Elias F. King, who died January 
19, 1886. She is now the wife of H. L. 
Sturtevant, a hotel-keeper in Hardwick. 
James W. Bemis contracted the first of his 
two marriages with Alice M. Hatch, who died 
August 25, 1883. His present wife was 
formerly Agnes Crossley. Politically, Mr. 
Bemis, Sr. , is a Democrat. He has served 
with ability as a member of the Board of 
Selectmen for several years; has also filled 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



89 



the offices of Assessor, Collector, and Treas- 
urer; and he is a member of Mount Zion 
Lodge, F. & A. M., of Barre, Mass. 



in New Marlboro, 
vigorous manhood. 
Stockbridge, Berk- 



's I HOMAS H. JONES, a prominent and 
1 I public-spirited resident of Warren, son 
-*- of William Jones, was born February 
8, 1830, in West Stockbridge, Berkshire 
County. He is of Welsh extraction, and 
comes of patriotic Revolutionary stock. His 
paternal grandfather, Thomas Jones, served as 
a soldier throughout the entire struggle for 
independence. 

William Jones, born 
Mass., there grew to a 
Settling then in West 
shire County, he was for more than a quarter 
of a century one of the leading agriculturists 
and an influential man in the town and 
county. He was Selectman of the town for 
many years, represented Stockbridge in the 
General Court of Massachusetts for one term, 
and for a number of years was Deputy Sheriff. 
In 1855 he removed to West Springfield, 
Mass. From Springfield, in 1861, he came 
to Warren, where he resided until his death, 
which occurred in 1875. In his earlier years 
he was a prominent member of the Whig 
party, and he became one of the most ardent 
supporters of the Republican party after its 
formation. His wife, Melinda (Hubbard) 
Jones, who was born in Sandisfield, Mass., 
bore him four children, of whom Thomas H. 
is the only survivor. 

Thomas H. Jones obtained a practical com- 
mon-school education in West Stockbridge, 
where he grew to man's estate. Commencing 
life for himself as a farmer, he followed that 
occupation in Berkshire County until 1861, 
when he came with his family to Warren. 
Here he purchased a farm, and successfully 
conducted it for some years. In 1890 he 
removed to the village, where he is now 
living. Since his arrival in Warren he has 
served his townsmen in the several capaci- 
ties of Superintendent of Streets, member of 
the local Board of Health, and Cemetery 
Commissioner. He was also Cattle Inspector 
in the town for a number of years. In poli- 



tics he is an uncompromising Republican. 
He is active in fraternal societies, belonging 
to both the Masons and the Odd Fellows. 

On April 18, 1852, Mr. Jones married 
Agnes P. Milligan, who was born in Alford, 
Mass. Her parents, Thomas and Lucy F. 
(Fletcher) Milligan, were respectively natives 
of New York State and Vermont. On the 
mother's side she is of Revolutionary stock, 
several of her Fletcher relatives having served 
in the Revolutionary War. Of the children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Milligan, three are now 
living, namely: John L., of Alford; Agnes 
P., now Mrs. Jones; and Mrs. Jennie M. F. 
Tripp, of Springfield, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jones have had three children, of whom Ar- 
thur S. is deceased. The others are: Mary 
L. and Willie E. Mary L. is the wife of 
Charles G. Hamblett, who is assistant road- 
master on the Boston & Albany Railroad be- 
tween Springfield and Worcester. 




ENRY FRANKLIN ROCKWELL, 
one of the most popular Mayors of 
Fitchburg, was born September 9, 
1849, in tne old Spofford-Garrison 
house at the north end of the city. He is 
a son of Henry O. and Sarah C. (Laws) Rock- 
well. His father's mother's family, the Gib- 
sons, were among the settlers of New England, 
in 1628, and some members of it served in the 
Revolutionary War. Henry O. Rockwell, 
who was a business man of Fitchburg, held 
decided views, was highly respected, and died 
in 1877, aged sixty-two years. His wife, 
who is still living, is a daughter of the late 
William Laws, of Westford, Mass. They 
had one son older than Henry F., William 
B. , who resides in California. 

Henry Franklin Rockwell was educated in 
the graded schools and the high school of 
Fitchburg. In 1864 he entered the employ of 
Samuel H. Woods, druggist, of Boston, with 
whom he remained three years. After this he 
spent nine years in Brooklyn, N.Y. He 
started in business for himself in Fitchburg 
in 1877. As a business man he has been 
very successful. Mr. Rockwell was an origi- 
nal director in the Fidelity Co-operative 



9° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Bank. A prominent member of the Republi- 
can party, he was chairman of the Republican 
City Committee for five years. He was in the 
Common Council in 1886, 1887, and 1888, serv- 
ing in the capacity of its president during the 
last two years; and on the Board of Aldermen 
for three successive years, serving on the Com- 
mittees on City Property, Claims, Highways, 
and Finance. In 1892 and 1893 he was in 
the legislature, and served during both terms 
on the Committees on Railroads. He was 
the Mayor of Fitchburg in 1896 and 1897; 
and he is now serving his third term in that 
office, to which he was elected in 1897 by the 
largest majority ever given a Mayoral candi- 
date in that city. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Rockwell was married to 
Jessie F., daughter of Thomas Lamberson, of 
Brooklyn, N.Y. They have two children: 
William M., in the Fitchburg High School; 
and Jessie K. Mr. Rockwell is a member of 
Alpine Lodge, No. 35, K. P., Uniform Rank; 
and of Apollo Lodge, I. O. O. F. He at- 
tends worship at Christ Episcopal Church. 




ON. GEORGE KING NICHOLS, 
of Grafton, Mass., one of the best 
known citizens in this section of 
Worcester County and one of the 
most highly esteemed, was born at Sher- 
brooke, Lower Canada, now the Province of 
Quebec, on April 10, 1827, his parents being 
John Adams and Melinda (King) Nichols, the 
former a native of Thornton, N.H., and the 
latter a native of Sutton, Mass. 

His father's grandfather, Colonel Moses 
Nichols, was a practising physician at Am- 
herst, N.H., and was an officer in the Ameri- 
can Revolution. As we learn from the His- 
tory of Amherst, N.H., this patriotic ances- 
tor was born in Reading, Mass., in 1740. 
He was a son of Timothy and Hannah (Per- 
kins) Nichols and grandson of Captain 
Thomas, who was a son of Richard Nichols, 
immigrant, an early settler of Reading. 
Colonel Nichols fought at the battle of Ben- 
nington, under General Stark, and opened the 
engagement with the regiment under his com- 
mand. 



The first of the family in Sherbrooke was 
the Colonel's son, Dr. Moses Nichols, Jr., 
who had studied medicine with his father, 
and eventually settled there for practice, hav- 
ing previously lived for a time at Thornton, 
N.H. John Adams Nichols, above named, 
son of Dr. Moses Nichols, Jr., engaged in 
mercantile business in Sherbrooke; but death 
ended his career when still a young man, and 
when his son George was only three and a half 
years old. The family then removed to Graf- 
ton, and Mrs. Nichols subsequently married 
Colonel William French, of Kingston, R.I. 

About a year after the death of his father 
George K. Nichols was adopted into the fam- 
ily of Colonel Joshua W. Leland, a prominent 
man of his time and descendant of one of the 
old and representative families of Grafton. 
The farm upon which he lived in the southern 
part of the town was deeded to his ancestors 
by the Indians, and has since been handed 
down from father to son in direct line. Colo- 
nel Leland was one of the most highly hon- 
ored and most able men in the community in 
which he lived. His title was gained from 
his connection with the militia. He repre- 
sented his district for two terms in the legis- 
lature. He sent his adopted son to the town 
schools, to Leicester Academy, and subse- 
quently to a select school at Manchester-by- 
the-Sea taught by Master Price. 

At the age of sixteen the young man went 
to Boston, and there secured employment in 
a dry-goods store, where he remained until he 
was of age. He then went to Albany, N.Y., 
and worked in a similar store for two years. 
Returning at the end of that time to Boston, 
he began the study of medicine with Dr. 
William E. Townsend, and subsequently 
started on a course of lectures in the Harvard 
Medical School. This, however, he did not 
complete, but left Harvard and went to the 
University of Pennsylvania, from which he 
received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
1855. This was before that university moved 
to its present magnificently equipped build- 
ing. Dr. Nichols took up the practice of his 
profession at Saundersville, Grafton; but at 
the expiration of two years he resigned it in 
order to accept an offer presenting very flatter- 




GEORGE K. NICHOLS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



93 



ing inducements to go into business in Boston 
as a partner in the firm of Nichols, Bacon & 
Co», dealers in dry-goods. 

In 1S60 he sold out to the other members of 
the firm and formed a partnership with Sam- 
uel Harrington, his father-in-law, who was 
then doing business at the old green store at 
Grafton, one of the oldest stands in the town. 
The business at this place was established in 
1806 by Wheeler & Warren. In 1841 the 
firm became Harrington & Wheeler, and in 
1843 Mr. Harrington became sole proprietor. 
When, in i860, Mr. Nichols became a partner, 
the firm name was changed to Harrington & 
Nichols, and continued so until 1877, after 
which Mr. Nichols carried the business on 
under his own name. In 1883 Mr. Harring- 
ton L. Nichols was taken into partnership 
with his father, and the firm name has since 
been George K. Nichols & Son. In 1873 the 
old building was replaced by a fine new struc- 
ture, the Nichols Block, which contains, be- 
sides the store, the National and Savings 
Banks and the G. A. R. Hall. 

Mr. Nichols was for many years a member 
of the Standing Committee of the Congrega- 
tional church, and he has been since 1874 one 
of the Deacons. He is a member of the 
Worcester Congregational Club, and in 1894 
and 1895 was its vice-president. Greatly in- 
terested in all things pertaining to the wel- 
fare of the town, Mr. Nichols has served the 
public in many important positions. He was 
one of the Selectmen of Grafton in 1864, 
1865, and 1866, when to that board fell the 
by no means easy task of filling the town's 
quotas for the war and transacting much other 
business relating to the soldiers and their 
families. In 1869 he was elected to the leg- 
islature, and during his term served on the 
Committee on Prisons. In 1892 and again 
in 1893 he was elected to the State Senate. 
His first election was the more notable be- 
cause his predecessor in the office had been 
a Democrat, who had gone in with a heavy 
vote. For his second term he was unani- 
mously nominated by his party, and was 
elected by a largely increased majority. In 
1892 Mr. Nichols was a rnember of the Sen- 
ate Committee which, with Governor Russell 



and his staff, represented the State at the 
opening of the Columbian Exposition in Chi- 
cago. He had previously, on the floor of the 
Senate, vigorously opposed keeping the mam- 
moth exhibit open on Sundays. During both 
of his Senatorial terms Mr. Nichols was on 
the Committee on Water Supply, and was 
chairman of the Committee on Public Health. 
During the last term he was also on the Com- 
mittee on Prisons. It was through his efforts 
as chairman of the Public Health Committee 
that the Sanitary Plumbing Bill was presented 
and passed, this being the first plumbing bill 
ever passed in the Massachusetts legislature. 
It referred to the licensing of plumbers and to 
supervision of plumbing, and probably created 
more opposition than any other bill brought 
before the Senate that year. Mr. Nichols, 
always active in debate, ably defended the 
measure. He was also instrumental in secur- 
ing the passage of the bill to prevent the 
using of drug-store licenses for the sale of in- 
toxicating liquors. 

Mr. Nichols in 1872 became a director in 
the Grafton National Bank, and since 1882 he 
has been its president. While in the legis- 
lature in 1869 he presented a petition for a 
charter for a savings-bank to be established 
in Grafton. He was one of the organizers of 
the bank, from 1877 to 1895 he was president, 
and he is now on the Board of Trustees. Mr. 
Nichols was chairman of the committee ap- 
pointed by the town to arrange for the Centen- 
nial of 1876. He was chairman of the com- 
mittee chosen to provide a town house, which 
resulted in the purchase of the present build- 
ing and its adaptation to that purpose. 

In 1857 Mr. Nichols married Mary' L., 
daughter of Samuel Harrington. She died 
September, 1893, having been the mother of 
three sons, namely: Harrington Leland, who 
is in business with his father; George Perry; 
and Samuel French Nichols. Harrington L. 
Nichols, who was born in 1859, is active in 
the Congregational church and in the work of 
the town library, being one of the trustees 
thereof. He is one of the directors of the 
National Bank, and in 1895 and 1896 was Se- 
lectman. He has been for several years a 
member of the Republican Town Committee. 



94 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He married a daughter of Charles H. Thurber, 
of Providence, R.I. George Perry and Sam- 
uel French Nichols are electrical engineers 
and contractors in Chicago. The former was 
educated at the Worcester Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, and the latter at Amherst College. 
George Perry Nichols married Miss Mabel I. 
Nobles, of Aurora, 111., and has two daugh- 
ters — Margaret Irene and Mary Elizabeth. 
Samuel French Nichols married Mary J. 
Forbes, daughter of A. P. Forbes, of St. 
Louis, Mo. They have one son, George Le- 
land Nichols. 




ILLIAM P. WOOD, an able farmer 
ff\/ and business man of Upton, son of 
Perry and Caroline (Staples) Wood, 
was born in Mendon, Mass., May 2, 1838. 
His great-grandfather, Obadiah Wood, mar- 
ried a sister of the Rev. Elisha Fish, who 
was installed as the second settled minister in 
Upton on June 5, 1750. His grandfather, 
Obadiah Wood (second), who owned the old 
homestead in Mendon, was a Quaker. 

Perry Wood, the father, was a prosperous 
farmer and a bridge-builder of considerable 
note in his day. He possessed much natural 
ability, and took an important part in town 
affairs. By his first marriage, which was 
contracted with Caroline Staples, there were 
nine children. His second wife, whose 
maiden name was Eliza Walker Stoddard, 
bore him two children. Eight of his children 
lived to maturity, namely: Joseph, who prac- 
tised law in Milford, and died in 1890: 
Henry, who was in the employ of the Swift 
Dressed Beef Company, and died in Philadel- 
phia some years since; Obadiah, now an in- 
valid; Frank, who occupies the old home- 
stead in Mendon; Mary, now the wife of Al- 
bert Shippee, of Holliston, Mass. ; Hattie, 
the wife of Liberty Freeman; Carrie, the wife 
of Thomas Harper, of Upton; and William 
P., the subject of this sketch. 

William P. Wood was educated in the 
schools of his native town. When a young 
man he bought the Ora Wood place in the 
southern part of Mendon, where he carried 
on farming for some years. Later he ran an 



express between Upton and Worcester, was 
engaged in lumbering and manufacturing, has 
done stone work, has built roads, and has had 
charge of the public highways in this section. 
He is the owner of a desirably located farm 
in Upton. The milk from his dairy is sold 
to regular customers in town. 

On November 25, 1863, Mr. Wood was 
joined in marriage with Adeline S. Walker, 
daughter of Chester Walker, a prosperous 
farmer and stone-mason of this town. Mr. 
Walker was one of the largest land-owners in 
Upton, did considerable business as a lumber- 
man, was widely known throughout this local- 
ity, and was for many years a leading member 
of the Congregational church. Mrs. Wood is 
the mother of three sons and one daughter, 
namely : Perry, a lumber manufacturer, who 
married Hattie Clark, of Upton, and has two 
children — William Perry and Ada Malora; 
Chester Walker Wood, who married Emrae- 
ranza Klemmer, of Trenton, N.J., has two 
children — Frances and Walter Klemmer — 
and conducts business for Swift & Co. in New 
Brunswick, that State; Benjamin Claflin 
Wood, who assists his brother Perry in the 
lumber business; and Mary Josephine, who 
resides at home. An energetic and upright 
business man, Mr. Wood is deservedly popu- 
lar with his fellow-townsmen, and is held in 
high estimation by a large circle of friends 
and acquaintances outside of his own neigh- 
borhood. He is a Master Mason, having 
taken his degrees in Blackstone River Lodge. 




AHUM FLAGG, a retired farmer of 
Worcester, son of John and Sarah 
(Ward) Flagg, was born in a 
house on Millbury Avenue, April 
27, 1 8 1 2. His great-grandparents were Ben- 
jamin and Abigail Flagg, of Watertown, 
Mass. The grandfather, Phineas Flagg, who 
was born in Watertown, October 9, 1 75 1 , 
came to Worcester when a young man, and on 
May 25, 1775, settled upon the farm which 
was the birthplace of his grandson, the sub- 
ject of this sketch. He married Rhoda Stone, 
who was born August 5, 1754. Their chil- 
dren were: John, born June 11,-1778; Abel, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



95 



born October 31, 1780, who died August 1, 
1865, leaving seven children; Sarah, born 
March 5, 1783, who married Sullivan Taft, 
and resided in Heath, Mass., for the rest of 
her life; Daniel, born April 17, 1785, who 
died March 12, 18 10; Polly, born December 
10, 1787, who died March 2, 1805; and Ben- 
jamin, born June 12, 1790, who carried on 
a farm at Tatnuck for many years, and spent 
his last days with his son in Springfield, 
where he died in 1880, aged ninety years. 
The father died October 1, 1 791. The mother, 
who was again married, left the home farm 
to her son John. 

John Flagg, who was a lifelong resident of 
Worcester, spent his active years prosperously 
engaged in general farming at the homestead, 
and died March 16, 1861. He was quite 
prominent in public affairs under the old 
town government, serving as Selectman, Over- 
seer of the Poor, and Tax Collector; and he 
represented the district in the legislature for 
two terms. His religious belief was the 
Baptist. Sarah, his wife, whom he married 
about the year 1800, was born in Ashburn- 
ham, Mass., June 19, 1775. She gave birth 
to eight children, namely: Rhoda, on March 

12, 1801, who married Darius Rice; Phineas, 
September 30, 1802, who died from the effects 
of a fall, January 20, 1807; Sarah, November 

13, 1804, who married in 1834 and died in 
1838; Lucy, November 14, 1807, who died 
May 3, 1810; Mary W., March 26, 1S10, 
who married Eden Davis, and died, an octo- 
genarian, in Thompson, Conn.; Nahum, the 
subject of this sketch; Hannah, October 1, 
181 5, who died January 11, i860; and Charles 
Flagg, November 3, 1821, who is also de- 
ceased. The mother died at the homestead 
April 15, 1843, aged sixty-eight years; and 
the property was sold to Thomas Yates in 
1878. 

Nahum Flagg spent his youth in attending 
school and assisting his father upon the farm. 
After leaving home at twenty-one, he was 
for the next ten years employed as a farm as- 
sistant. Then he engaged in farming upon 
his own account. In 1851 he settled upon 
his present farm of seventy acres, and soon 
after erected the present residence. He car- 



ried on general farming until 1872, since 
which time the property has been devoted to 
dairy purposes. At present the milk of 
eighteen cows is sold to regular customers 
in the city. 

On April 13, 1843, Mr. Flagg was united 
in marriage with Lydia F. Harrington, a 
daughter of Francis and Lyclia (Perry) Har- 
rington, born in Worcester, December 12, 
1 8 14. Mr. Harrington, who was a prosper- 
ous farmer, died October 17, 1841, aged sixty- 
four years; and his wife, on October 27, 1868, 
at the age of ninety years, eight months, and 
seven days. Of their three sons and three 
daughters, Mrs. Flagg is the only survivor. 
Mr. and Mrs. Flagg have two children, 
namely: Albert D., who was born August 22, 
1844; ar >d Ellen M., who is residing at home. 
Albert D. Flagg on September 16, 1885, 
married Mary C. Mullikin, who was born in 
Jersey City, daughter of William E. Mulli- 
kin, and who previous to her marriage re- 
sided in Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Albert D. 
Flagg and Miss Ellen M. Flagg are members 
of the local grange, Patrons of Husbandry, of 
which Mr. Nahum Flagg has been the treas- 
urer for sixteen years, and his sister the sec- 
retary for the past eighteen years. Nahum 
Flagg is one of the best known and most 
prosperous among Worcester's agriculturists. 
Mrs. Nahum Flagg is a member of the Con- 
gregational church. 




WHITIN DUDLEY, who was for 
many years a prominent merchant 
of Whitinsville, was born in Am- 
sterdam, N.Y., on April 3, 1817. 
His parents, Amasa and Ann (Fletcher) Dud- 
ley, removed from Whitinsville to New York 
State, but returned not long after his birth. 
His childhood was passed in Uxbridge and 
Whitinsville. After receiving his education 
in the common schools and at Uxbridge Acad- 
emy, he was employed in his father's store 
until he was about thirty years of age. Com- 
ing then to Whitinsville, he had charge of the 
store of P. Whitin & Sons until the firm was 
dissolved in 1864. At that time he formed a 
partnership with Charles P. Whitin, under the 



9 6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



firm name of P. W. Dudley & Co., and subse- 
quently managed the affairs of the concern 
throughout the rest of his life. He had also 
an interest in the First National Bank, of 
which he was a director. 

Mr. Dudley possessed untiring industry, 
understood his business thoroughly, and was 
a man of strict integrity. All persons with 
whom he associated, whether employees or pa- 
trons, recognized his worth, and appreciated 
him accordingly. During the troublous years 
of 1862, 1863, 1S64, and 1865, in the ca- 
pacity of chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
he directed the affairs of the town in a man- 
ner that reflected great credit upon him. 
After the close of the Civil War he de- 
clined re-election. His benevolence was 
shown in the thoughtful care with which he 
provided for the families of soldiers and aided 
the worthy poor who applied to him. He 
was especially interested in the temperance 
movement, and at the time of his death was 
the president of the Worcester Southern Tem- 
perance Union and a member of the State 
Temperance Alliance. A member of the 
Congregational church since he came to 
Whitinsville in 1846, he was one of the Dea- 
cons of that society dating from January 11, 
1 866, and the superintendent of its Sunday- 
school for a number of years. 

On October 19, 1842, Mr. Dudley was 
married to Sarah A. Tobey, of Worcester. 
The children of this union were: Henry M., 
Herbert H., Sarah Jane, and Walter Whitin 
Dudley. The eldest, Henry Dudley, who 
died in June, 1876, was born in Uxbridge on 
August 12, 1S46. He graduated at Willis- 
ton Seminary, Easthampton, Mass., in 1865, 
and from the Sheffield Scientific School of 
Yale College in 1868. In 1875 he opened a 
drug store in Whitinsville, and was in busi- 
ness here for seven years. At the end of that 
time he removed to Woonsocket, R.I., where 
he was engaged in the drug business until his 
death. He was a Sir Knight of Woonsocket 
Commandery, K. T. ; a member of the Woon- 
socket Business Men's Association; a mem- 
ber of Mount Hope Lodge, New England 
Order of Protection, and the Royal Society 
of Good Fellows; a charter member of Ames 



Lodge, A. O. U. W. ; and an associate mem- 
ber of the Sons of Brown, being the first asso- 
ciate elected in that organization. As a 
scientist Mr. Dudley had few superiors among 
the druggists of the State, and he was relied 
on by many physicians in Northern Rhode 
Island for chemical and microscopical tests. 
Herbert Dudley, an enterprising merchant of 
Whitinsville, has served on the School Com- 
mittee and the Board of Selectmen, and is 
now Town Treasurer. Sarah Jane Dudley, 
who is a graduate of Wheaton Female Semi- 
nary, is deeply interested in benevolent work, 
and was the organizer of the Samaritan Asso- 
ciation of Whitinsville. Walter Dudley, who 
was educated at Greylock Academy in South 
Williamstown, is in business in Whitinsville 
with his cousin, Charles V. Dudley. The 
father, P. Whitin Dudley, died on July 1, 
1872. 



JENJAMIN FRANKLIN PAIGE, a 
retired business man of Hardwick, 
born here, March 24, 1820, is a son 
of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Webb) 
Clark Paige, who were also natives of the 
town. His grandfather, John Paige, likewise 
born in Hardwick, was a son of John Paige, 
who was a son of Christopher Paige and an 
early settler in Hardwick. The father, who 
was extensively engaged in farming in the 
region of Muddy Brook, died at the age of 
fifty-eight years. He left in all about four 
hundred and twenty-five acres of land, includ- 
ing a well-stocked farm. His wife, whose 
first husband was Ezra Clark, bore him five 
children, of whom two died in infancy. The 
survivors are: Benjamin F., the subject of 
this sketch; Mary C, born December 18, 
1823, who is now the widow of the late Henry 
Bassett, and resides in Ware, Mass. ; and 
John W. Paige, born August 15, 1825, who 
is a resident of this town. The mother died 
at the age of seventy-three years. She was a 
member of the Congregational church. 

Benjamin Franklin Paige was educated in 
the district schools of Hardwick. He was a 
small boy when his father died. As his 
mother was left with the care of a large farm, 





HAMMOND BROWN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



99 



he assisted in its cultivation until he was 
twenty-one years old. He then went to Bos- 
ton, where he kept a victualling establishment 
for a time. Then, having acquired an aver- 
sion to the business, he sold out, and, return- 
ing to his native town, engaged in peddling 
Yankee notions. In 1843, when twenty- 
three years old, he settled in the locality 
known as Furnace; and, entering the palm-leaf 
business, he followed it successfully until his 
retirement in 1890. Through energy and 
business ability he has acquired a comfort- 
able fortune, which is judiciously invested. 
In addition to considerable agricultural prop- 
erty in Hardwick, he owns tenement houses 
in North Brookfield and Holyoke, Mass. 

On December 31, 1848, Mr. Paige was 
joined in marriage with Pamelia Danforth, 
who was born in this town, September 15, 
1827. Her parents, Cyrus and Hannah P. 
(Jenney) Danforth, were natives of Hardwick. 
His children by her were: Mary, who married 
James Matthews, and died in her thirty-fifth 
year; and George D. Paige, who married 
Lotta Conkey, and resides in Hardwick. 
Mrs. Matthews left one son, Benjamin P., 
who was drowned when nine years old. A 
Republican in politics, Mr. Paige was one of 
the prime movers in organizing the party in 
this town. For many years he has been ac- 
tively engaged in promoting the business in- 
terests of this locality. Both he and Mrs. 
Paige are held in high estimation by the en- 
tire community. 




Bro 



wn, 



"AMMOND BROWN was one of the 
pioneer boot and shoe manufacturers 
of New England as well as of West 
Brookfield. A son of Brigham 
he was born March 27, 1810, in 
Leicester, Worcester County. Reared and 
educated in Leicester, he there learned and 
followed for a time the shoemaker's trade. 
Soon after attaining man's estate he came to 
the part of Worcester County that is now in- 
corporated as West Brookfield, and with John 
M. Fales, in the firm Fales & Brown, began 
to manufacture boots and shoes. Several 
years later the partnership was dissolved, 



after which he continued the business alone. 
For a full half-century he was one of the lead- 
ing shoe manufacturers of this town, giving 
employment to a large number of men. He 
also invested in land, and for some years of 
his later life was successfully engaged in gen- 
eral farming, becoming as well known in agri- 
cultural circles as he was in manufacturing 
and political life. Politically, he was an un- 
compromising Democrat, conscientious in all 
his convictions. Once his mind was made up 
as to the proper course for him to pursue, he 
seldom deviated from that course. He served 
as Selectman and Treasurer of West Brook- 
field, and in 1853 he was a delegate to 
the State Constitutional Convention. While 
liberal in his religious belief, he attended 
the Congregational church, and was a gener- 
ous contributor toward its support. A man of 
noble physique, he had corresponding mental 
and moral attributes. 

Mr. Brown contracted the first of his two- 
marriages in 1834 with Miss Roxy Bemis. 
Of her children by him, the survivors are: 
George H. Brown, of West Brookfield; and 
Mrs. C. P. Blanchard, of Brookfield. His 
second marriage was made in May, i860, with 
Mary A. L. Blair, who was born in West 
Brookfield, Mass. A daughter of Joseph and 
Mary (Tuffs) Blair, she is a descendant of one 
of the oldest families of this town and of pio- 
neers of this part of the county. Mrs. Brown 
is an active member of the Congregational 
church, and is highly esteemed in the social 
circles of the town in which her life has been 
spent. Mr. Brown died August 21, 1891, in 
his eighty-second year. 



sm 



EORGE LEWIS DARLING, a pros- 
\ SJT perous farmer of Sutton, was born in 
this town, March 21, 1844, son of 
John and Lydia (Fuller) Darling. His pa- 
ternal great-grandfather was William Darl- 
ing, who served as a Lieutenant in the Con- 
tinental army during the Revolutionary War, 
and who after his discharge from the army 
carried on a fulling and grist mill in Sutton. 
John Darling, father of George L., was born 
in 1799. The active period of his life was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



devoted to general farming, and he lived to an 
advanced age. Having in a large degree the 
respect and confidence of his fellow-towns- 
men, he was frequently called upon to serve 
in positions of public trust, and was Select- 
man in 1859. 

George Lewis Darling was educated in the 
public schools of his native town. He as- 
sisted his father in carrying on the home farm 
until entering upon his apprenticeship to the 
machinist's trade, which he followed as a jour- 
neyman for some time. Failing health finally 
compelled him to abandon it; and, returning 
to the homestead, he has since given his at- 
tention to agricultural pursuits. His prop- 
erty, which is desirably located, contains 
about two hundred acres of well-improved 
land, and he has made good use of his oppor- 
tunities for self-advancement. 

In 1872 Mr. Darling was joined in mar- 
riage with Abby Jane Sheldon, daughter of 
Ezekiel and Mary (Robbins) Sheldon. Her 
father served in the First New Hampshire 
Heavy Artillery during the Civil War, and 
three of his brothers were also in the Federal 
army. Mrs. Darling is the mother of three 
children: John, born in 1874; Florence, born 
in 1877; and Clara, born in 1879 — a ^ °f 
whom reside at home with their parents. 

Politically, Mr. Darling is a Republican. 
His farm and other property interests have 
prevented him from taking a very active part 
in public affairs. He is, however, serving 
with ability as Road Surveyor of his district; 
and his assistance in advancing all measures 
calculated to be of benefit to the community 
can always be depended upon. In his relig- 
ious belief he is a Baptist. 



•@rs 



EORGE FREDERICK PARKER 
\ 'S I DAY, Deputy Collector of Taxes, 
Fitchburg, was born in this city, 
February 26, 1849, son of Leonard and Susan 
B. (Parker) Day. He is a descendant in the 
eighth generation of Ralph Day (first), an 
Englishman, who settled in Dedham, Mass., 
prior to 1640. Records show that this ances- 
tor was made a freeman in 1645, that he was 
an Ensign, that he served as a Selectman 



during the years 1661 and 1662, and that he 
died November 28, 1677. His wife, Susan, a 
daughter of Jonathan Fairbanks, of Dedham; 
died July 8, 1659. Ralph Day (second), who 
was born in Dedham and baptized February 
11, 1657, was a lifelong resident of that town, 
and died October 21, 1694. He married 
Sarah, daughter of Thomas and Hannah 
(Flower) Fuller, of Dedham; and his son, 
Jeremiah, the next in line, was born in Ded- 
ham, September 28, 1692. Jeremiah Day, 
who settled in Walpole, Mass., and there re- 
sided for the rest of his life, married Mary, 
daughter of Andrew Willett, a merchant of 
Boston. Jeremiah Day (second), born in 
Dedham, April 25, 1725, died in Walpole, 
April 1, 1752. The maiden name of his 
wife was Mary Aldrich. Joseph Day, son 
of Jeremiah (second) and great-grandfather of 
the subject 'of this sketch, was born in Wal- 
pole, December 8, 1750. He resided in Wal- 
pole and Foxboro, Mass., and in Eddington, 
Me., and died in Massachusetts in March, 
1832 or 1833. On November 18, 1773, he 
married Elizabeth Gay, who was born in Ded- 
ham, November 27, 1752, daughter of Samuel 
and Elizabeth Gay. Benjamin Day, G. F. P. 
Day's grandfather, was born in Foxboro, Sep- 
tember 12, 1779. The greater part of his life 
was spent in Orange, Mass; and he died in 
Fitchburg, Mass., November 20, 1861. He 
married Martha Bacon, who was born in Ded- 
ham, November 10, 1782, daughter of Josiah 
and Abigail (Smith) Bacon, and the ceremony 
took place in Dover, Mass. She died January 
3, 1869. A singular fact brought out in 
tracing the genealogies of the Day and Bacon 
lines is this: the great-grandfather of Benja- 
min Day and the great-grandmother of Martha 
Bacon (who became his wife) were brother 
and sister, being respectively Jeremiah and 
Abiell Day, son and daughter of the second 
Ralph Day, of Dedham. 

Leonard Day, G. F. P. Day's father, was 
born in Orange, November 8, 1807. He set- 
tled in Fitchburg, where the major part of his 
active years was spent, and he died Septem- 
ber 27, 1864. He was prominently connected 
with the stage line between Boston and Fitch- 
burg until the completion of the Fitchburg 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Railroad in 1845, when he became one of its 
first conductors, later succeeding Henry F. 
Kenney as its agent at Fitchburg. His wife, 
Susan B., born in Brattleboro, Vt., in 1819, 
was a daughter of Stephen and Hannah Avery 
(Paddleford) Parker. Her ancestry on the pa- 
ternal side is traced to a native of Chelms- 
ford, England, who sailed from London for 
New England on board the ship "Susan and 
Ellen" in 1635. Her grandfather, Captain 
Parker, was a Revolutionary soldier, whose 
widow, having removed to Canada, received a 
pension from the United States so long as she 
lived. 

George Frederick Parker Day was educated 
in the common and high schools of Fitchburg, 
and soon after the completion of his studies 
he went to California on account of ill health. 
Upon his recovery he returned to this city, 
and in 1872 entered the city engineer's office 
under Thomas C. Lovell, remaining in the 
department about three years, In 1876 he 
became connected with the engineering de- 
partment of the Fitchburg Railroad as first 
assistant engineer, under E. K. Turner, chief 
engineer. During the succeeding ten years 
he took an active part in the reconstruction of 
the Vermont and Massachusetts Division be- 
tween Fitchburg and Greenfield. This work 
included the building of the large double-arch 
stone bridge in West Fitchburg, the horse- 
shoe curve improvement at Ashburnham Junc- 
tion, supplanting the former switchback, 
which required the turning of all locomotives 
and the shunting of trains; the survey and 
building of a new line between Baldwinsville 
and Royalston, thereby eliminating four large 
bridges over the Miller's River; the change 
of location of the railroad and the cutting of 
a new channel for the river between Royals- 
ton and Athol, and also, a mile east of Miller's 
Falls, improvements that enabled the road to 
dispense with four more long bridges over the 
Miller's River; the separation of grades of the 
Vermont & Massachusetts and New London 
Northern Railroads west of Miller's Falls; 
and the building of the new Connecticut 
River Bridge between Montague and East 
Deerfield in connection with the double track- 
ing of the fifty-six miles, In 1886 Mr. Day 



resigned his position on account of his son's 
health ; and, accompanying the latter to South- 
ern California, he remained there until 1889. 
In the spring of 1890 he was appointed by 
George E. Clifford to his present position of 
Deputy Collector of Taxes, the duties of 
which office he has since discharged with 
ability. 

Mr= Day joined Aurora Lodge, F. & 
A. M., in July, 1871, and became a junior 
member of the American Society of Civil En- 
gineers in 1880. He married in June, 1879, 
Marion F., daughter of Charles L. and Har- 
riet E. (Harris) Wilder, of Lancaster, Mass. 
They have two children: Leonard, born Au- 
gust 8, 1880; and Alice Wilder, born August 

21, I883. 




ILLIAM F. FULLAM, a success- 
ful builder and lumber dealer of 
North Brookfield, was born in this 
town, October 1, 1856, son of William and 
Ann (Bryant) Fullam. The family is of 
English origin. The grandfather of William 
F. was Elisha Fullam, a resident of Vermont. 
Both of his parents were natives of that State. 
The father, after learning the carpenter's trade 
in Worcester, Mass., settled in North Brook- 
field over half a century ago, and there fol- 
lowed the business of contractor and builder 
until a short time before his death, which oc- 
curred on December 20, 1893. In politics he 
supported the Republican party. As a busi- 
ness man and a citizen he was widely known, 
and he had the respect of his fellow-townsmen 
for his many commendable qualities. He was 
a member , of the Congregational church. 
Ann Fullam, his wife, who is still living, be- 
came the mother of several children, of whom 
the survivors are: Ella, who is now Mrs. 
J. M. Doane, of Brockton, Mass. ; William 
F., the subject of this sketch; and Frederick 
L. Fullam, of North Brookfield. 

William F. Fullam received his education 
in the common schools of his native town, 
concluding in the high school. After serving 
an apprenticeship with his father and master- 
ing every detail of the carpenter's trade, he 
became associated with the latter in 1879 in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the firm of William Fullam & Co. The part- 
nership continued until the elder Fullam's re- 
tirement in March, 1893. Since then Mr. 
Fullam has been the sole proprietor of the 
business. He does quite an .extensive trade, 
both as a building contractor and a lumber 
dealer, and in the busy season he employs 
from fifty to sixty men. 

By his marriage with Ann M. Kingsbury, 
of North Brookfield, a daughter of Joel Kings- 
bury, Mr. Fullam is the father of three sons 
— -William H., Frederick A., and Charles F. 
Fullam. In politics he is a Republican. He 
has served with ability as a Selectman for 
three years, during two of which he was the 
chairman of the board. In 1897 he was 
elected a Water Commissioner for three years. 
He belongs to Woodbine Lodge, I. O. 0. F., 
of North Brookfield; and to the local grange, 
Patrons of Husbandry. His interest in pub- 
lic affairs has been proved on several occa- 
sions, and he is regarded as one of the pro- 
gressive men of the town. He is an esteemed 
member of the Congregational church. 



'OHN HOLT, the Postmaster of Man- 
chaug, town of Sutton, was born in 
Millbury, Mass., September 22, 1854, 
son of Lawrence and Mary (Dunkerly) 
Holt. The grandfather, who was a soldier in 
the British army, served under the Duke of 
Wellington at the battle of Waterloo. The 
family has a claim upon a tract of land one 
mile square in the city of Manchester, Eng- 
land, and efforts are still being made to ob- 
tain possession of the property. Lawrence 
Holt, who was born in England, after learn- 
ing the trade of an iron founder, emigrated 
to the United States, accompanied by his 
wife and one child. While he located in 
Millbury, he obtained employment at his 
calling in New York. Afterward he worked 
at his trade in Millbury. 

John Holt attended the public schools in 
Sutton, and studied telegraphy in Boston. 
His mercantile training was acquired in the 
store of A. & B. H. Watson, Norfolk Square, 
Boston. Coming from there to Manchaug, he 
became a clerk in the company store of B. B, 



& R. Knight, which was then under the man- 
agement of T. C. Page. He continued in the 
same capacity under Mr. Page's successor, 
H. A. Brown; and upon the retirement of the 
latter in 1885 he was advanced to the posi- 
tion of manager. The store is one of the 
largest establishments in this section, em- 
ploying a force of six clerks, and carrying a 
stock of general merchandise, which includes 
a line of nearly every department of trade. 
In addition to the wide business knowledge 
and executive ability necessary to successfully 
conduct the place, the varied character of .its 
patrons, comprising many nationalities, de- 
mands considerable tact. The display of 
these qualities, together with a uniform cour- 
tesy, has enabled the present superintendent 
to give general satisfaction, both to the pub- 
lic and his employers. 

In politics Mr. Holt is a Prohibitionist. 
He served with ability as a Selectman from 
1886 to 1891 ; he has been Postmaster for the 
past ten years; and in 1896 he was chosen a 
member of the School Committee for three 
years, in which capacity he is required to pro- 
vide six schools with teachers and supplies. 
He married Edna Josephine Manahan, and 
has a family of four children, namely: Mary 
Edna, born September 22, 1882; John Law- 
rence, born May 24, 1884; Vera Lillian, born 
November 14, 1887; and Mildred, born June 
21, 1890. Mr. Holt belongs to the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen in East Douglas. 
He was formerly the treasurer and collector 
of the Baptist church, and is now acting in 
the same capacity in the Sunday-school con- 
nected with that society. 



T^HARLES PARKMAN RICE, who 
1 KrS was for many years a successful mer- 
\b , chant of Westboro, was born here, 
October 16, 1809. His father, 
Jesse Rice, son of Ezekiel Rice, was a de- 
scendant of Edmund Rice, of England, who 
came to this country, and settled in Sudbury, 
Mass., in 1638. Ezekiel was a farmer, resid- 
ing in Framingham, Mass. When Paul 
Revere rode through the town - crying, "To 
arms! the redcoats are upon us," Ezekiel, who 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



103 



was ploughing in his field, left his horse and 
plough, took his gun and powder-horn, and 
started on foot for Concord. He remained 
in the army throughout the entire Revolu- 
tionary War, most of the time under General 
Putnam, for whom he had a great admiration. 
The maternal grandfather of Mr. Rice, from 
whom, doubtless, he inherited his marked 
characteristics, was Barnabas Newton, who 
was a large real estate owner, both in this 
town and in others. He was a very public- 
spirited man and one whose judgment was 
sought and highly prized by the townsmen. 

Charles Parkman Rice worked on his 
father's farm until he was twenty-one years of 
age. He then went to Boston as an employee 
in a provision establishment. At the expira- 
tion of two years he was called home by the 
death of his father, to attend to family affairs. 
At that time it was thought best to sell the 
farm, and at the end of a year the family 
moved. After this he had charge of what was 
known as the Parkman farm for several years. 
From there he entered the employment of 
Lyman Belknap, who was carrying on an ex- 
tensive business in the meat line, sending out 
several carts through this and adjoining 
towns, and employing quite a number of men. 
Mr. Rice had the general oversight of the men 
employed. He also had entire charge of a de- 
partment in which the produce of the farmers 
in the vicinity, such as butter, cheese, lard, 
and meats, was collected, and on every Wednes- 
day sent in a heavy market wagon drawn by 
two horses to Boston, where it was marketed 
on Thursday, and its place in the wagon taken 
by a supply of heavy groceries, such as mo- 
lasses, oil, and flour, for the return trip, 
which ended on Friday night. In 1836 
Luther Chamberlain, an enterprising business 
man, having bought and fitted up for business 
purposes the historic church that has been 
known as "The Arcade Building," urged 
Messrs. Belknap and Rice to open a market 
there. They did so, starting with a quarter 
of beef, a bushel of turnips, and a dozen 
pumpkins. From this small beginning the 
market grew rapidly. For some time it was 
the only one between Framingham and 
Worcester, and consequently it had customers 



from all the adjoining towns — Upton, South- 
boro, Hopkinton, Northboro, and Grafton. 
After a year or two Mr. Belknap withdrew 
from the firm to engage in the commission 
business in Boston, and Mr. Rice subse- 
quently conducted the market at the same 
stand for a period of forty years. By strict 
economy, industry, and honorable dealing he 
acquired a handsome fortune and the esteem 
and confidence of the people. 

Mr. Rice had a varied experience in the 
management of the affairs of the town, hav- 
ing been repeatedly called to high and re- 
sponsible duties, which he invariably dis- 
charged with fidelity and marked ability. He 
represented the town in the legislature in 
1855. The records of the Town Clerk show 
that from 1843 to 1878, a period of thirty-five 
years, he held either the office of Overseer of 
the Poor or Selectman, and often both to- 
gether, and that throughout the larger part of 
the time he was the chairman of both boards. 
He was Selectman for eleven years, a period 
exceeded only twice in the history of the 
town. At the time of the dedication of the 
soldiers' monument, in June, 1869, he was 
chairman of the Board of Selectmen, and at 
the dedicatory exercises, according to the town 
records, "he made a fitting speech in accept- 
ance." He served the Agricultural Society 
both as its president and treasurer, and at the 
time of his death he was one of the directors 
of the savings-bank and a member of its Board 
of Finance. In politics he was identified 
with the old Whig party. He was an es- 
teemed and honored member of the Ancient 
Order of Free Masons. A sympathetic friend 
and counsellor to the poorer classes, his 
deeds of charity were dispensed in such an un- 
ostentatious manner that it could be truthfully 
said of him, his left hand knew not what his 
right hand did. His death, which occurred 
at his home, February 11, 1879, was the re- 
sult of eleven days' illness with typhoid pneu- 
monia. 

On October 15, 1838, Mr. Rice married 
Miss Jane Nourse, of Northboro, Mass. She 
is a daughter of Theophilus Nourse, of Berlin, 
Mass., and a grand-daughter of Dr. Benjamin 
Nourse, also of Berlin. Three children came 



io4 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of the union, namely: Charles Amory, born 
April 26, 1840; and Jennie Maria and Louise 
Sophia, twins, born June 28, 1847. Charles 
Amory Rice was for a number of years con- 
nected with the baggage department of the 
Boston & Albany Railroad at Boston. Dur- 
ing the Civil War he enlisted in the Forty- 
third (Tiger) Regiment of Boston, and served 
in the Carolinas and Virginia. He first mar- 
ried on April 6, 1866, Lizzie B. Wakefield, 
of Lyndon, Vt., who had one son, Charles 
Pliny, born January 1, 1870. This son has 
been employed for eleven years in the office of 
J. A. Frye, a boot and shoe manufacturer of 
Marlboro, Mass. In September, 1876, a sec- 
ond marriage united Charles A. Rice with 
Ella J. Cleveland, of Guilford, Vt., who also 
had one son, Arthur Parkman, born November 
29, 1879, now a student at the Chelsea High 
School. Jennie Maria Rice was for fourteen 
years connected with the Western Union Tel- 
egraph Company; and Louise Sophia Rice 
married James A. Kelly, of Boston, Mass., on 
November 28, 1878. 




ILL-IS MARTIN WELLINGTON, 
one of the best known residents of 
Oxford, was born in this town, 
March 9, 1844, son of William and Irene 
(Kidder) Wellington. He is a descendant of 
Roger Wellington who came from England in 
1630 and settled at Watertown. His great- 
grandfather, David Wellington, who lived in 
Worcester, rendered valuable assistance to the 
cause of independence during the Revolution- 
ary War. William Wellington, his grand- 
father, owned and occupied a farm located 
upon the road between Oxford and Worcester. 
The father, who died in 1872, was a railroad 
contractor for a number of years, and also 
carried on a farm in this town. 

Willis Martin Wellington graduated from 
the Oxford High School. In his youth he 
worked upon the home farm. When a young 
man .he began to assist his father in superin- 
tending the crews of workmen employed by 
the latter in building railroads. After the 
father died, he and his brother continued the 
business left by their deceased parent. 



Afterward they had been actively engaged in 
fulfilling contracts for about seventeen years, 
when Willis M. practically retired from busi- 
ness. He is interested in the Oxford National 
Bank, of which he is a director. 

Mr. Wellington married Emma F. Copp, 
a daughter of Jesse W. Copp, of Oxford. 
She is a descendant of the Copps for whom 
Copp's Hill, Boston, was named. Her great- 
grandfather was David Copp, of Killingly, 
Conn. Her grandfather, William Copp, 
settled here in 1832, and was a Deacon of 
the church. William Otis Wellington, the 
only son of Mr. and Mrs. Wellington, 
born on November 18, 1874, graduated 
from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 
the class of 1895, and is now a civil engineer 
in Boston. In politics Mr. Wellington is a 
Republican. He has_ served with ability as a 
member of the Board of Selectmen, was an 
Assessor for seven consecutive years, and 
Town Treasurer two years. Appointed Post- 
master by President Harrison in 18S9, he 
served in that capacity until some time after 
the election of President Cleveland. He was 
reappointed by McKinley. Efficient public 
service was also rendered by him as a mem- 
ber of the State Board of Agriculture for three 
years. 



OHN C. GIBBS, a well-known resident 
of Brookfield, was born in Warner, 
N. H., January 12, 1826, son of Tyler 
and Mary E. (Greenleaf) Gibbs. His 
father and his grandfather, William Gibbs, 
were natives of Hopkinton, Mass; and his 
mother was born in Worcester. Pie accom- 
panied his parents from Warner to Worcester 
when six years old, and shortly after he went 
with them to New London, Conn. His educa- 
tion was begun in the Quaker village school, 
near the last named city, and completed at the 
New London Academy. After leaving the 
academy he was employed as a grocery clerk 
in the grocery of C. W. Strickland & Brother, 
of New London, until he was twenty years old. 
Then he went to Norwich, where he served his 
apprenticeship at the machinist's trade with 
Hugh Wilson & Son. In 1850 for a sljort 




WILLIS M. WELLINGTON. 




WILLIAM B. RAMSDELL. 



ro,< 



t~PU BLIC 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



107 



time he was the second engineer of the steam- 
boat "Jersey Blue," plying between New 
Haven and New York, after which he resumed 
his trade in Norwich. Beginning in 1852, he 
was employed as an engineer by the Heyward 
Rubber Company of Colchester, Conn., for 
four years. Moving to Fitchburg, Mass., 
after this, he spent some time in the employ- 
ment of the Putnam Machine Company. 
Coming to Brookfield in i860 as master me- 
chanic for Kimball & Robinson, shoe manu- 
facturers, he continued with them and their 
several successors, the E. Twitchell Shoe 
Company and George H. Burt, for a number of 
years. He subsequently became the engineer 
of a steam mill belonging to John C. Kimball, 
in which capacity he worked until his retire- 
ment some time ago. 

On March 31, 1858, Mr. Gibbs was united 
in marriage with Louisa Smith, of East Had- 
dam, Conn., a daughter of Abner C. and Hope 
(Marshall) Smith, both natives of that town. 
Her grandfather, Captain Jeremiah Smith, was 
a Revolutionary soldier; her uncle, Captain 
Azariah Smith, served in the War of 1812; 
and her brother, Benjamin Smith, was among 
the defenders of the Union in the Civil War. 
In politics Mr. Gibbs is a Republican. A 
public-spirited man, he takes an earnest inter- 
est in the welfare and prosperity of the town. 
He is a charter member and was the treasurer 
for a number of years of Hayden Lodge, F. & 
A. M., of Brookfield, which was organized in 
1864. In the Congregational church, with 
which he and Mrs. Gibbs have been united for 
many years, he is a Deacon and the treasurer 
of the society. 




ILLIAM B. RAMSDELL, of War- 
ren, the president of the Warren 
Board of Trade and the vice-presi- 
dent of the Warren Savings Bank, was born 
here, June 2, 1825. A son of Homer and 
Betsy (Stockbridge) Ramsdell, both of whom 
were natives of Hanover, Mass., he is a de- 
scendant of Joseph Ramsdell, in Plymouth, 
Mass., in 1643. Joseph's son, Samuel, set- 
tled on the site of the present town of Hanover 
in Plymouth County. Samuel's son, Joseph, 



who was the father of Homer Ramsdell, 
bought the farm in Warren, which has since 
been in the possession of his descendants. 
Homer, then about nineteen years old, accom- 
panied by his brother Joseph, came in 1800 
to Warren, which was then called Weston. 
He was a leading man in town, and for many 
years was a member of the Board of Select- 
men. His death happened at Warren in De- 
cember, 1850. Besides his son William, 
there is one other living child; namely, Mary 
E. , who is the wife of Joseph K. Makepeace, 
of Springfield. Reared on a farm here, Will- 
iam B. Ramsdell was chiefly occupied in agri- 
culture until 1864, when he began the manu- 
facture of boots and shoes. After following 
this business until 1884, he retired. For a 
short time he was in company with Mr. B. A. 
Tripp under the firm name of Ramsdell & 
Tripp. His early education was obtained in 
the common schools of Warren, in a private 
school, and in the academy of Warren. By 
careful and systematic reading he has kept 
himself well informed on all topics of general 
interest. When a young man he studied civil 
engineering; and for thirty years, in addition 
to his other business, he did more or less sur- 
veying. He has served Warren as Selectman 
and Assessor. Since the organization of the 
Board of Trade be has been its president. 
The savings-bank, of which he was one of the 
founders, owes much of its prosperity to his 
good judgment and efficient action. He has 
been one of the trustees of the institution 
since its organization, and he is its vice-presi- 
dent and a member of its Board of Investment. 
In politics Mr. Ramsdell is a Republican; 
but he does not feel obliged to indorse every 
measure of his party, and he often votes an in- 
dependent ticket. He married Mary A. 
Makepeace, of West Brookfield, daughter of 
the late Augustus Makepeace. Of his four 
children, Homer A. and William B. are de- 
ceased. The others are: Jennie M., who is 
the wife of George M. Faulkner, the treasurer 
of the Slater Engine Company, of Warren ; and 
Emma A., who is the wife of Joseph D. Hast- 
ings, a well-known druggist of Warren. Mr. 
Ramsdell has the respect of all who know 
him. 



io8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




AUL S. LINCOLN, Postmaster at 
Southville, town of Southboro, was 
born in Acton, Mass., in 1858. His 
parents moved to Ashland when he 
was four years old. After graduating from 
the high school in that place, he learned shoe- 
making. In 1886 he formed a partnership 
with C. S. Jones for the purpose of engaging 
in the grocery trade in Southville. The firm 
conducted a successful business until 1892, 
when they sold out and dissolved. Mr. 
Lincoln immediately purchased another store 
and started again. This he had carried on for 
about three years, when, in December, 1896, 
the place was totally destroyed by fire, causing 
a severe loss, as there was no insurance. 
After this he re-established himself in busi- 
ness in connection with the Post-office, having 
been appointed Postmaster by President Harri- 
son in 1891 ; and he still retains the position. 
Born of his marriage with Clara Hill, of Ash- 
land, are two children — a daughter, now aged 
fourteen ; and a son, aged eight years. 

Local public affairs have absorbed a great 
deal of Mr. Lincoln's attention, as his well- 
known ability makes him especially eligible 
to town offices. As a member of the School 
Board he has rendered good service in behalf 
of public education, was a Constable for some 
years, and is an Overseer of the Poor. Pie is 
Past Master of St. Bernard Lodge, F. & 
A. M. , of Southboro; a member of Mayflower 
Council, No. 58, of Ashland ; and of the Pa- 
trons of Husbandry, of Southboro. 




STEPHEN HALL EAMES, of West 
Upton, the foreman of the blocking 
department of the Knowlton Straw 
Factory, was born in Upton, Febru- 
ary 16, 1850, son of David F. and Sarah T. 
(Whitney) Fames. His immigrant ancestor, 
Thomas Eames, who was a brickmaker and a 
mason, came to this country in 1634, and three 
days later fought in the Pequod War. Rec- 
ords show him to have been in Medford from 
1652 to 1659, occupying a water privilege on 
the banks of the Mystic; to have owned a 
house and eight acres of land in Cambridge in 
1664 and 1665; and subsequently to have be- 



come an inhabitant of Sherborn, on territory 
now within the limits of Framingham. In 
1669 he built a house and barn on the southern 
slope of Mount Wayte. At one time during 
King Philip's War, when he was absent from 
home in Boston, the Indians swooped down 
upon his defenceless family and set fire to his 
buildings. His household at that time con- 
sisted of his wife, eight or nine of his chil- 
dren and one or two of his wife's children by 
a former marriage. His wife and five of the 
children were murdered after a desperate re- 
sistance, in which the woman used hot soap as 
a means of defence. The other members of 
his family were carried into captivity, whence 
three of them, Margaret, Samuel, and Na- 
thaniel, subsequently managed to escape. At 
that time he lost all his worldly possessions 
with the exception of the two horses that he 
had taken with him to Boston. He estimated 
the value of his buildings and other property 
at three hundred and thirty pounds. As in- 
demnification for this he received from the 
General Court a grant of two hundred acres of 
land, and recovered two hundred acres more 
from the Indians. This Thomas Eames was a 
Selectman in 1678 and a member of the com- 
mittee appointed to build the first meeting- 
house in Sherborn. He dropped dead on Jan- 
uary 25, 16S0. 

Samuel Eames, born in 1664, who was capt- 
ured by the Indians, was the direct ancestor of 
Stephen Hall Eames. After being carried 
away by the Indians he spent from February 
until the following May in captivity. He 
then managed to escape and make his way to a 
white settlement by looking for the plant 
called by the Indians English foot and by the 
whites plantain, now so common in all parts of 
New England, but which was never found here 
until the white men came. Samuel was twice 
married — the first time in 1689 to Mary 
Death, and the second time in 1698 to 
Patience Twitchell. His son, Jonathan, who 
was born in 171 1, married Abigail Goldbing, 
and settled in Holliston. Jonathan's son, 
Reuben, lived and died in Holliston. Reu- 
ben's son Moses, who was born in 1764, was 
an Ensign in the militia. He settled in 
Upton, and died here in 1828. Moses, sec- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



[09 



ond, son of Moses, first, was born in 1787. In 
1809 he married Nancy Fay, who bore him 
thirteen children. 

David F. Eames, son of Moses and Nancy 
Eames, born in 1813, was for many years en- 
gaged in butchering and in the meat business 
in Upton. Subsequently he forsook these oc- 
cupations, and, having bought a fruit farm, he 
engaged in its cultivation, at the same time 
carrying on a large stone business. He was 
a member of the farmers' club, and on many 
occasions he took premiums at the local fairs. 
Remarkable for his generosity, he was espe- 
cially liberal to the Congregational church, of 
which he was a member. His wife, Sarah, 
came from the same family as Eli Whitney, 
of cotton-gin fame. She was the mother of 
the following children: George J., born in 
1840, who died in infancy; Emilie W., born 
November 11, 1842; Harvey A., born Febru- 
ary 7, 1845; Herbert L., born June 13, 1847, 
who married Grace Nicholson in 1882; 
Stephen Hall Eames, the subject of this biog- 
raphy ; and Frank M. Eames, born October 
22, 1856. Emilie W. Eames graduated at 
Mount Holyoke Seminary, and subsequently 
taught school for a number of years. She 
married H. B. Harvey, of Meriden, Conn., and 
died July 18, 1897. Harvey established a 
straw business in New York City, and in 1877 
built at Bay Ridge a large factory, which was 
struck by lightning in 1890 and burned. He 
is now in California for his health. 

Stephen Hall Eames was educated in the 
public schools of Upton and at Wilbraham 
Academy. He went into the straw factory 
soon after leaving school, and in time rose to 
his present position. He has. now charge of 
about ninety operatives, and is looked upon as 
one of the most valuable men in the employ of 
the company. He is an active member of the 
Congregational church, and in politics he is an 
ardent Republican. On February 1, 1872, he 
was married to Flora E. Rockwood, daughter 
of James A. and Jane M. Rockwood. His 
children are: Burton E. and F. Leroy. The 
former, who was born September 25, 1875, 
graduated from the town high school at the 
head of his class, entered Worcester Polytech- 
nic Institute, class of 1897, and is now a 



teacher of mathematics and an assistant in 
physics at that institution. F. Leroy, who 
was born May 6, 1882, is now pursuing a 
course of study in the Upton High School. 

The men of the Eames family have been, for 
the most part, of great size and commanding 
stature. They have also been distinguished 
for ability and energy, and have filled posi- 
tions of usefulness and influence. The family 
prize very much the crest and coat of arms 
granted to Sir Henry Eames, K. G. , several 
centuries ago. 



WARREN NYE, a well-known citi- 
zen of Milford, now retired from active 
business life, was born in Montpelier, 
Vt. , on January 24, 1822, son of Iran 
and Ores (Willey) Nye. The father owned 
some six hundred and forty acres in the en- 
virons of Montpelier, and was engaged in 
lumbering and stock-raising on an extensive 
scale. At his death he was ninety years old. 
He was an active member of the Orthodox- 
church. 

J. Warren Nye spent his early life on his 
father's farm. When twenty-one years of age 
he came to Lowell, Mass., and was there en- 
gaged for some years in making boots and 
shoes. In 1854 he went to Illinois, where he 
remained for six years in the general merchan- 
dise business in company with his brother. 
Although highly successful in this venture, he 
eventually sold out and returned to Massachu- 
setts, locating in Worcester. Here he and 
George G. Hildreth conducted an undertaking 
business for five years. At the end of that 
time he disposed of his interest, and formed a 
partnership with John M. Wood for carrying 
on the same business in Milford. This con- 
nection lasted until four years ago, when Mr. 
Nye retired. His quick sympathies especially 
fitted him to discharge the oftentimes difficult 
tasks that fell to him. He won many warm 
friends by his conscientiousness and other 
sterling qualities of mind and heart. In social 
life he is a genial and companionable gentle- 
man. 

Mr. Nye is a Master Mason and a member 
of Montgomery Lodge in Milford. By his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



marriage with Abilena Perry, a daughter of 
Dana Perry, he is the father of three children, 
namely: George Waldo Nye, who is in the 
railroad business in Chicago; Charles Dana 
Nye, who is in a book and stationery business 
in Worcester; and Nellie Mulissa, who was 
for fifteen years a successful school teacher in 
Millbury, is unmarried, and resides with her 
parents. 



JTSJTON. RODNEY WALLACE, of 
j-T-rj Fitchburg, the donor of the Wallace 

\( s I Library and Art Building, was born 

— ' in New Ipswich, N.H., December 
21, 1823. His parents were David and Rox- 
anna (Gowen) Wallace. Starting at the age 
of twelve to make his own way in the world, 
he hired out to a farmer for forty dollars for 
the first year, with the privilege of attending 
school during eight weeks in the winter. 
This forty dollars was the nucleus of a large 
fortune; and the eight weeks of schooling was 
the foundation of a fund of knowledge gleaned 
here and there, as opportunity offered, that has 
fitted him for prominent positions of trust and 
responsibility. At the age of sixteen he 
began to drive freight teams from Bellows 
Falls, Vt., and Rindge, N.H., to Boston, re- 
turning with loads of merchandise. 

In 1843, when he was twenty years old, Mr. 
Wallace entered the employ of Dr. Stephen 
Jewett, of Rindge, N. H., the proprietor of 
Jewett's celebrated medicines, and subse- 
quently travelled as his agent through five 
of the New England States. Leaving Dr. 
Jewett's employ in 1853, Mr. Wallace formed 
a copartnership with Stephen Shepley in 
Fitchburg, and engaged in the sale of books, 
stationery, paper, and cotton waste by whole- 
sale. The business was at first conducted 
under the name of Shepley & Wallace and 
then under the style of R. Wallace & Co. 
On July 1, 1865, the partnership was dissolved 
and the business divided, Mr. Wallace taking 
the cotton waste department, which is still 
under his management, and has since grown to 
large proportions. He handles waste to the 
amount of a quarter of a million dollars yearly. 
On December 31, 1864, he and three partners 



purchased the Lyon paper-mill and Kimball 
scythe shops at W T est Fitchburg, and began to 
manufacture paper under the name of the 
Fitchburg Paper Company. In January, 1869, 
he purchased the interest of his partners and 
became sole owner of the property. Since 
then he has added largely to the original plant, 
erected many dwellings for the employees, a 
depot, and two mills complete, with all the 
most modern improvements. Four machines 
are in operation, and the mills produce twenty- 
five tons of paper daily. This enterprise has 
been in existence for upward of thirty-three 
years without change of name. Since 1864 
Mr. Wallace has been a director and the presi- 
dent of the Fitchburg Gas Company; and from 
the same date, with an interim of one year, he 
has been a director of the Putnam Machine 
Company. Since 1866 he has been a director 
of the Fitchburg National Bank, since 1877 
a partner in the Fitchburg Woollen Mill 
Company, and since 1878 a trustee of Smith 
College, Northampton, Mass. He is also a 
director of the Fitchburg Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company, a trustee of the Fitchburg Savings 
Bank, a director of the Fitchburg Railroad 
Company, a director and a large stockholder in 
the Parkh ill Manufacturing Company, and he 
has been intrusted with the settlement of sev- 
eral large and important estates. 

On December 1, 1853, Mr. W'allace was 
married to Sophia, daughter of Thomas In- 
galls, of Rindge, N. H. She died June 20, 
1871, leaving two sons — Herbert I. and 
George R., who are associated with their 
father in the management of his business. 
On December 28, 1876, a second marriage 
united him to Mrs. Sophia F. Billings Bailey, 
of Woodstock, Vt. , who died November 9, 
1895. For politics he has had little ambition, 
yet he has been elected to several important 
offices. In 1864, 1865, and 1867 he was Se- 
lectman of Fitchburg. In 1873 he repre- 
sented Fitchburg in the General Court; and he 
was unanimously renominated the following 
year, but declined re-election on account of 
his health. He was State Councillor through- 
out the whole administration of Governor 
Long, in 1884 he was a delegate to the Na- 
tional Republican Convention, and in 1889-90 






#^&***y?7'6ce€+ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



"3 



he represented the Eleventh Congressional 
District in the National House of Representa- 
tives. Mr. Wallace has liberally aided nu- 
merous undertakings for the benefit of the city. 
The Wallace Library and Art Building, which 
was erected by him in 1885 at a cost of 
eighty-four thousand dollars, and presented to 
the city of Fitchburg free of all conditions ex- 
cept that "it should be under the care of the 
Board of Trustees of the Public Library for the 
time being, and be used for a free public li- 
brary, reading-rooms, and art gallery, and for 
no other purpose," is a monument to his mu- 
nificence and public spirit. The building is 
admirably adapted to the use for which it was 
intended, and is a constant source of profit and 
pleasure to all classes of citizens. Mr. Wal- 
lace also built and gave to the town of Rindge, 
N.H., the home of his first wife, a brick edi- 
fice with brownstone trimmings, for a public 
library, to which use it was dedicated in 1894. 




ECHARIAH F. YOUNG, Clerk of 
the Board of Assessors, Fitchburg, 
was born in Athol, Mass., March 
10, 1 82 1, son of Joseph and Sophia 
(Field) Young. His paternal grandfather was 
David Young, who at an early date settled in 
Athol, where he cultivated a farm during his 
active years, and reared a family of six sons 
and- five daughters. The sons were: Reuben, 
James, Moses, David, Joshua, and Joseph. 

Joseph Young, Zechariah F. Young's father, 
was born in Athol, Mass. In early life he 
followed the carpenter's trade, which he subse- 
quently relinquished in order to keep a hotel. 
His wife, Sophia, who was born in Northfield, 
Mass., became the mother of four children, 
one of whom, Joseph, was killed in the battle 
of the Wilderness. The only one now living 
is the subject of this sketch. 

Zechariah F. Young was educated in the 
common schools of his native town and at the 
academy in New Salem, Mass. In his 
younger days he was employed as a hotel 
clerk, being connected at different times with 
hostelries in Greenfield, Northampton, Am- 
herst, and Northfield. He was also engaged 
in farming to some extent. In May, 1847, he 



came to Fitchburg as time-keeper for the en- 
gineers engaged in building the Vermont & 
Massachusetts Railroad; and when the line 
was opened he was appointed to a position in 
the freight department. Some four years later 
he was made general freight agent in Fitch- 
burg, and continued in that capacity until 
1878. 

On January 1, 1850, Mr. Young was united 
in marriage with Angelia Ballou, daughter of 
Luther and Clara Ballou, of Royalston, Mass. 
Mrs. Young died in March, 1891, having been 
the mother of four children, one of whom, a 
daughter, is now the wife of Augustine S. 
Belding, and resides in this city. Mr. Young 
has been quite active in public affairs. He 
was a member of the Common Council for one 
year; was chosen a member of the Massachu- 
setts legislature for the year 1882 ; was chosen 
an Assessor in 1888, and with the exception 
of one year, in which he acted as chairman of 
the board, he has served as its clerk with 
marked ability until the present time. He at- 
tends the Unitarian church. 




ILLIAM E. PATRICK, a well- 
known resident of Warren, Mass., 
and the chairman of its present 
Board of Selectmen, was born in this town, 
May 2, 1847. A son of William A. and 
Sophia (Bishop) Patrick, he is a direct de- 
scendant of John Patrick, who came here when 
the country was in its primeval wildness, built 
his log house, and reared his family. John's 
son, Matthew, the great-grandfather of Will- 
iam E. Patrick, was a man of prominence 
among the early pioneers, and served as Se- 
lectman of the town. The grandfather, Isaac, 
son of Matthew, was also a Selectman, served 
in other town offices, and represented Warren 
in the General Court. William A. Patrick, a 
lifelong resident of Warren, was engaged in 
agriculture throughout his active period, and 
was one of the substantial men of the town. 
Also active in public life, he served acceptably 
as Selectman, Assessor, and Overseer of the 
Poor for a number of years. His wife, 
Sophia, was born in Brimfiekl, Mass. 

Flaving completed his early education at 



ll 4 



.BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Eastman's Business College in Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., William E. Patrick assisted his father 
in the management of the home farm for a 
number of years. Accepting then the posi- 
tion of agent for C. Brigham & Co., wholesale 
milk contractors of Boston, he shipped dairy 
products to that firm from Warren and adjoin- 
ing towns for fifteen consecutive years. In 
1885 he settled on his present fine farm, where 
he has since been prosperously engaged in 
general farming. Also, as senior partner of 
the firm W. E. Patrick & Son he has owned 
and attended an extensive milk route in this 
locality. He has been a member of the Board 
of Selectmen for several terms, and for the 
past six years the efficient chairman of that 
body. For one year he has been Assessor, 
and he is also a director of the Warren Public 
Library and a justice of the Peace. A Repub- 
lican in politics, he is a member of the Re- 
publican Town Committee. 

Taking much interest in agricultural ques- 
tions, Mr. Patrick has performed excellent 
work for the farmers of the county in the 
Warren Grange, of which he is now the Mas- 
ter, and in the West Brookfield Farmers' Club 
— the largest organization of the kind in the 
State — of which he has been the president for 
a number of years. He belongs to Arcturus 
Lodge, I. O. O. F., and is an active member 
of the Congregational church. On June 29, 
1870, he was married to Ella F., daughter of 
Sumner Sibley, late of Warren. His chil- 
dren, all living in Warren, are: Grace M., 
the wife of Herbert N. Shepard ; William S. ; 
and Ralph B. 



'AMES QUIGLEY, a prosperous farmer 
of Mendon, was born in Queens County, 
Ireland, in November, 1838. His 
father, Timothy Ouigley, was also a 
farmer. He came to this country in 1851, 
then less than fourteen years old, intent on 
finding his fortune in the New World. After 
learning the shoemaker's trade, he worked at 
it industriously for nearly forty years in vari- 
ous parts of the country, including Philadel- 
phia, Springfield, Mass., and Hartford, Conn., 
but chiefly in the factories of Mendon, Hop- 



kinton, and Milford. In 1890, having 
acquired some means by his industry, persever- 
ance, and frugality, he purchased what is 
known as the Davenport farm in Mendon, and 
there settled down to farming. To-day he is 
regarded as one of the most prosperous farmers 
in the township. He has always taken an in- 
terest in whatever pertained to the welfare of 
the town in which he lived. An ardent Dem- 
ocrat, he has been actively identified with his 
party as delegate to its various State, legisla- 
tive, and senatorial conventions. He served 
Mendon for three years as a member of its 
Board of Assessors. In 1889 he represented 
his district in the legislature, where he served 
with credit in the Committee on the Consti- 
tution. 

Mr. Ouigley married Mary Welsh, who has 
lived in Mendon since her thirteenth year. 
Of their nine children, six are living, namely: 
Nellie, who is the wife of William Foley, the 
Tax Collector of Milford, and has three chil- 
dren ; Lizzie, who resides with her uncle in 
Hopkinton ; Annie, who is the wife of John 
Colbert, of Upton; Alice, who resides in 
Framingham ; James, who is a machinist at 
Hopedale; and Rose, who is a student in the 
Mendon High School. The eldest son, Tim- 
othy, died in Mendon at the age of thirty. 



M 



ANIEL CURTIS MILES, national 
bank examiner, is a well - known 
citizen of Worcester County, resid- 
ing in Westminster. He was born 
in the eastern part of this town on June 1, 
1827. Mr. Miles is a son of the late Daniel 
and Mary (Curtis) Miles, and is the elder 
brother of Major-general Nelson A. Miles. 
His first paternal ancestor in America was 
the Rev. John Myles, a Baptist clergyman, 
born in Wales in 1621 and educated at Ox- 
ford, who, being persecuted for non-con- 
formity, left Wales and came to New England 
about 1663, and for many years was pastor of 
a Baptist church founded by him at Swansea, 
Mass. He died in 1683. His family his- 
tory, as given in part by different early 
writers, is incomplete and sometimes contra- 
dictory. John Myles, Jr., is mentioned at an 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



117 



early date as Town Clerk of Swansea. Samuel 
Myles, grandson of Elder Myles, was born in 
1689. 

Daniel Miles, a native of Pomfret, Conn., 
thought to have been of the fourth generation 
in descent from the first John Myles, removed 
to Petersham, Mass., and was the founder of 
the Worcester County branch of the Elder's 
posterity. He died in 1777. Both Daniel 
Miles, and his son Joab, who was born in 
1742, and died in 1832, aged ninty-one, 
fought in the Revolution. 

Daniel Miles, son of Joab, came from 
Petersham to Westminster about 1824, and 
engaged in farming and lumbering. He was 
a man of energy and executive ability and 
a public-spirited citizen. He held the office 
of Selectman, and was a prominent member of 
the Baptist church. During the latter part of 
his life he lived on what was known as the 
Miles homestead. He died in 1875, at the 
age of seventy-five; and his wife, whose name 
before marriage was Mary Curtis, died the 
same year, aged seventy-three. She was the 
eldest daughter of Francis and Mary (Gilbert) 
Curtis and a sister of the father of ex-Mayor 
Curtis of Boston. Her father was a son of 
the Rev. Philip Curtis, of Sharon, Mass., 
Daniel and Mary (Curtis) Miles were the par- 
ents of four children, namely: Daniel Curtis; 
Mary Jane, now Mrs. Gardner Merriam, of 
Leominster; Ann Maria, now Mrs. Samuel 
H. Sprague, of Westminster; and Nelson 
Appleton, now General Miles, Commander of 
the United States army. 

Daniel Curtis Miles, after obtaining his 
education in the public and in private schools 
and at Westminster Academy, taught school 
for sixteen terms in Lancaster, Westminster, 
and Gardner, one of his pupils at West- 
minster being his younger brother, Nelson 
A., when eleven and twelve years of age. 
Daniel C. Miles began his active business life 
as a farmer, but gradually enlarged the field 
of his operations, and became proprietor of a 
saw and grist mill and of a factory for the 
production of chair stock. He also dealt 
largely in lumber. The chair factory and 
connected buildings at South Westminster 
were erected largely through his efforts, and 



for three years he was a partner with Messrs. 
Merriam & Holden. Mr- Miles also owned 
and operated the Westminster and Winchen- 
don bakeries for three years. Prospering in 
these enterprises, he went into partnership 
with Mr. Lombard for the purpose of manu- 
facturing cane and ratan chairs. The firm was 
known under the name of Miles & Lombard, 
and the plant was located at North Westmin- 
ster. The name was subsequently changed to 
that of Miles & Son, and became one of the 
most important industries in that part of the 
town, giving employment to seventy-five 
persons. 

Mr. Miles was the prime mover in estab- 
lishing the Westminster National Bank, of 
which he was president from its organization 
in 1875 until 1895, when he resigned. For 
some years past he has been interested in real 
estate, and has operated extensively in land 
in Southern California and elsewhere; and he 
now has an interest in a large cattle ranch 
near Miles City, Mont. This city was 
founded by his son, George M. Miles, and 
named in honor of General Miles. 

Mr. Miles enlisted for service in the Civil 
War; but, his town being called upon to fur- 
nish only two men, he was not mustered in. 
He, however, accompanied his younger brother 
to the Potomac bridge, which was as far 
South as he was allowed to go as a citizen; 
and twice afterward, when his brother was re- 
ported mortally wounded, he went to the front 
to help him home. He also went once to the 
seat of war to bring home the body of his 
brother-in-law, James Puffer, which he dug 
from a grave on the field of Gettysburg, put- 
ting it into a freight car attached to the first 
train that left Gettysburg after the battle. 
His only resting place was the box that held 
the body of the dead soldier, upon which he 
laid his boots as a pillow. The car held 
fourteen other boxes, each containing the dead 
body of a soldier. 

On May 22, 1851, Mr. Miles was married 
to Lucy Ann, daughter of James and Lucy 
(Jones) Puffer. Of this union five children 
were born, namely: Mary Josephine, now wife 
of M. M. Parker, president of the Univer- 
sity at Tucson, Ariz.; George M., of Miles 



n8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



City; Herbert J., now with his father; Ar- 
thur W., of Livingston, Mont. ; and Martha 
G., deceased. Mrs. Lucy A. Miles, a woman 
of most excellent qualities of heart and mind, 
passed to the higher life on February 9, 1869. 

While successfully engaged in business, 
Mr. Miles has not overlooked the fact that he 
had responsibilities toward the public and 
duties as a citizen. He has held the office of 
Auditor, Selectman, Assessor, and Collector 
for the town, and has served several years as 
chairman of the School Board. He has also 
been president of the Worcester North Agri- 
cultural Society for two years and trustee ten 
years, superintendent of the Baptist Sunday- 
school for twenty years, clerk of the Baptist 
society for sixteen years, a member fifty-nine 
years, and president of the Wachusett Bap- 
tist Association and Justice of the Peace for 
many years. He is at present, November, 
1S98, national bank examiner for all the 
banks of the State outside of Boston. 

During the past twenty years Mr. Miles has 
travelled extensively, and has visited many 
foreign countries, as well as all" the States and 
Territories and many of the large cities of the 
United States and the chief points of interest 
in California, Wyoming, Oregon, Colorado, 
and the British Provinces. In Europe he 
journeyed in Italy, Switzerland, France, and 
the British Isles. 



f^ELSON APPLETON MILES, Major- 
general, commanding United States 
Army. — -General Miles was born 
on a farm in Westminster, Mass., 
August 6, 1839, being the younger son of 
Daniel and Mary (Curtis) Miles and a repre- 
sentative of the fourth generation of his fam- 
ily in Worcester County. 

The immigrant progenitor of this stock was 
the Rev. John Myles, the pastor of a Baptist 
church in Wales, who, being forced to give 
up his charge on account of non-conformity, 
came to New England with members of his 
flock in 1662 or 1663, founded a Baptist 
church at a place in or near Rehoboth, which 
in 1667 was incorporated as the town of Swan- 
sea. He was engaged by the town as a school- 



master to teach Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, 
besides English grammar; and being a man 
of valor, as well as a learned and pious divine 
of the more liberal sort for those days, he did 
good service as commander of the garrison at 
Swansea in King Philip's War, his own 
house being fortified. For three or four years 
after the close of the war, his people 'being 
scattered, he lived and preached in Boston, 
returning then to Swansea. He died in 1683. 
Samuel Myles, his grandson, was born in 
1689. Daniel Miles, a descendant of the 
Rev. John Myles and great-grandfather of 
General Miles, removed from Pomfret, Conn., 
to Petersham, Mass., and died there in 1777. 
Both he and his son Joab fought in the Revo- 
lution. His grandson, Daniel, born in 1799, 
son of Joab, removed to Westminster in 1824. 
From Heywood's History of this town we 
learn that Mary Curtis, the wife of Daniel 
Miles, of Westminster, and mother of General 
Miles, was a daughter of Francis Curtis, a 
grand-daughter of the Rev. Philip Curtis, of 
Sharon, and a descendant of William Curtis, 
who with his wife, Sarah Eliot, came over 
from England in 1632, and settled at Rox- 
bury, Mass. Daniel and Mary C. Miles 
reared four children :' Daniel C, a sketch of 
whom appears on another page of this work; 
Mary J., now Mrs. Gardner Merriam; Ann 
Maria, now Mrs. Samuel H. Sprague; and 
Nelson Appleton. 

Country-born and country-bred under the 
best of parental guidance, his father a man of 
"sterling integrity, resolute will, and the 
highest sense of honor," his mother gentle, 
watchful, inspiring him to noble endeavor, 
Nelson A. Miles acquired his elementary edu- 
cation in the district school, out of school 
hours became an expert at skating, hunting, 
and horseback riding, and completed his 
course of study at the village academy. 
While yet in his school days he evinced 
strong military instincts, it being a favorite 
occupation of his to line up his school-fel- 
lows in two bodies, as Indians and whites, 
and lead them in mimic warfare. From 
stories of his ancestors told at the family fire- 
side he learned lessons of patriotism, which 
doubtless helped to form his character and 




NELSON A. MILES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



influence his purpose in later life. Leaving 
home at the age of sixteen, he became clerk 
in a crockery store in Boston. It is doubt- 
ful if he ever showed any special aptitude for 
a mercantile career. From what followed it 
may be gathered that he looked about with 
his eyes open, and held himself ready for 
new occasions and new duties. 

With the approach of the Civil War his 
opportunity came. Taking, with other young 
men, lessons in drilling of an old French 
army officer in Boston, he began to prepare 
himself for action and for a leading part. 
Largely through his efforts was recruited a 
company of infantry, which became Company 
E, Twenty-second Massachusetts Volunteers, 
and of which he was commissioned Captain, 
and mustered in as such on September 9, 
1 86 1. Shortly, however, before leaving camp, 
at the request of Governor Andrew, he gave 
up his commission, which was wanted for an 
older man, and accepted instead that of First 
Lieutenant. In his book of "Personal Recol- 
lections" he says, "I therefore began my mil- 
itary service as a Captain reduced to a First 
Lieutenant in the Twenty-second Regiment, 
Massachusetts Volunteers." 

Intent on serving his country, energetic, 
resolute, daring, and an excellent horseman, 
he was shortly detailed for staff duty as an 
Aide-de-camp and afterward as Assistant Ad- 
jutant-general of a brigade. In May, 1862, 
on recommendation of Colonel Francis C. 
Barlow, of the Sixty-first New York Volun- 
teers (afterward General Barlow), he was ap- 
pointed Lieutenant Colonel of that regiment; 
and on September 30, 1862, he was commis- 
sioned Colonel. He was made Brigadier-gen- 
eral, United States Volunteers, May 12, 1864; 
brevetted Major-general of Volunteers in Au- 
gust following; and promoted to the rank of 
Major-general, United States Volunteers, in 
October, 1865. His commission as Colonel 
in the regular army is dated July 28, 1866. 
He was brevetted Brigadier-general and 
Major-general, United States Army, on March 
2, 1867; transferred to the Fifth United 
States Infantry in March, 1869; commis- 
sioned Brigadier-general in December, 1880; 
commissioned Major-general, April 5, 1890. 



He accepted the office April 14, 1890, and is 
now, 1898, in command of the United States 
army. 

The career of General Miles during the 
Civil War was a brilliant one. His rapid 
promotions were the just reward of valiant 
deeds. Before the close of the conflict this 
citizen soldier had risen to the command of 
the Second Army Corps, consisting of twenty- 
seven regiments and two batteries; and for 
two weeks he commanded the corps of about 
twenty-five thousand men, having charge also 
of Fortress Monroe, with Jefferson Davis as 
a prisoner. He was engaged in nearly all the 
battles of the Army of the Potomac, particu- 
larly distinguishing himself at Fair Oaks, at 
Antietam, at Fredericksburg, and at Chancel- 
lorsville. He was four times wounded, twice 
severely and, it was feared, mortally. Im- 
mediately after the disbanding of the volun- 
teers he enlisted in the regular army as Colo- 
nel. In later years, in the conduct of six 
victorious Indian campaigns, with the result 
of opening up vast territory in the Far West 
to the advance of civilization, General Miles 
gave further proof of his efficiency as a com- 
mander, in the words of the historian of West- 
minster, "exhibiting in his dealings with and 
treatment of the Indian wards of the nation 
a degree of common sense, practical wisdom, 
humane feeling, and Christian principle, alike 
creditable to both his head and his heart." 

In the volume of "Personal Recollections," 
already alluded to, the reader will find a very 
interesting account of the aforesaid Indian 
campaigns and explorations, together with 
valuable notes and comments on the develop- 
ment and progress of the great West. 

It is a fact worthy of notice in this connec- 
tion that Sarah Eliot, wife of William Curtis, 
from whom General Miles through his mother 
is a descendant of the seventh generation, was 
a sister — so the genealogists say — of John 
Eliot, of revered memory, the apostle to the 
Indians. 

The part taken by General Miles in the 
conduct of the Spanish War of 1898 is not so 
well known to the public now as it will be 
later, after the writing of the history of the 
war. His presence and counsel were long 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



needed in Washington. His orders to Gen- 
eral Shafter were sent in the capacity of com- 
manding General. Arriving in Cuba with 
re-enforcements at a critical juncture, he con- 
ducted to a successful issue the pending ne- 
gotiations for the surrender of General Toral. 
The well-planned campaign of Porto Rico, 
happily victorious without bloodshed, was led 
by him in person. "The sentiment of the 
people," it has been said, "was in no sense 
outraged by the invaders, but on the contrary 
was successfully propitiated." At Guanica, 
on July 27, he issued to the inhabitants of the 
island a proclamation, of which the following 
is a part : — ■ 

"In the prosecution of the war against the 
kingdom of Spain by the people of the United 
States, in the cause of liberty, justice, and 
humanity, its military forces have come to 
occupy the island of Porto Rico. They come 
bearing the banners of freedom, inspired by 
noble purposes. . . . 

"The chief object of the American military 
forces will be to overthrow the armed author- 
ity of Spain, and give the people of your 
beautiful island the largest measure of liberty 
consistent with this military occupation. . . . 

"They bring protection, not only to your- 
selves, but to your property. ... It is not 
their purpose to interfere with the existing 
laws and customs, which are wholesome and 
beneficial to the people, so long as they con- 
form to the rules of the military administra- 
tion, order, and justice. This is not a war of 
devastation and dissolution, but one to give 
all within the control of the military and 
naval forces the advantages and blessings of 
enlightened civilization." 

To this proclamation a very friendly re- 
sponse was made by the municipal officers of 
the island. 

The order issued by General Miles to the 
army officers at an early date in the war with 
Spain shows him to be a man who has a deep 
sense of responsibility as a military leader: 
"Every officer, of whatever grade, will, so far 
as may be in his power, guard and preserve 
the health and welfare of those under his 
charge. He must labor diligently and zeal- 
ously to perfect himself and his subordinates 



in military drill, instruction, and discipline; 
and, above all, he must constantly endeavor, 
by precept and example, to maintain the high- 
est character, to foster and stimulate that 
soldierly spirit and patriotic devotion to duty 
which must characterize an effective army." 

At a banquet recently given in his honor in 
New York City on November 11, 1898, Gen- 
eral Miles spoke of the war as having been 
waged "in the interest of humanity and in be- 
half of a heroic people, who for many years 
have been struggling against cruel atrocities, 
oppression, and despotism of a once powerful 
nation. " " One great blessing to the country, " 
he went on to say, "in this brief but de- 
cisive war, has been to firmly unite in bonds 
of imperishable union all sections of the 
United States — North, South, East, and 
West. Still more, it has given us reason and 
opportunity to appreciate our obligation to the 
mother country for the dignified and powerful 
influence of the British empire in the main- 
tenance of our principles and right. 

"We are ascending to a clearer atmosphere, 
up to a higher Mecca, where we should take 
a stronger position than ever before occupied 
by our government and people. . . . This 
much I think is apparent to all, that the grave 
responsibilities of the nation are too great to 
be contaminated by personal, partisan, or sec- 
tional interests. Our interests are national 
in the highest degree." 

Governor Wolcott, of Massachusetts, speak- 
ing in behalf of the Commonwealth, said of 
the distinguished guest of the evening: — ■ 

"He has reversed the order that prevails in 
Great Britain, where an honored career finds 
its close in Westminster: General Miles 
drew his first breath in Westminster, Mass. 
It was a happy augury ; and yet, when a man 
has attained lofty heights of achievement in 
civil or military life, he steps beyond the 
bounds of his native State, and knows no 
North, no South, no East, or West. He is, 
in its broadest sense, an American citizen ; 
and all American citizens unite to do him 
honor." 

General Miles married Mary Sherman, 
daughter of Judge Charles Sherman and niece 
of General William T. Sherman and of John 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



123 



Sherman, former Secretary of State. Of this 
union two children were born, Mary Cecelia 
Sherman Miles and Daniel Sherman Miles. 




"ON. LUTHER HILL, one of the fore- 
most residents of the town of Spen- 
cer, was born in Hillsville, this 
town, November 22, 1825. His 
father was a prosperous merchant. At the age 
of fourteen years he left the district school to 
begin the battle of life for himself, and for a 
year thereafter was employed as a clerk in 
Worcester, Mass. During the following three 
years he drove a team from Spencer to Boston. 
After this he was a clerk in his father's store 
until he reached his majority. 

Mr. Hill has since then been prominently 
identified with public affairs. Although he 
has never had any special advantages for ac- 
quiring legal knowledge, in the capacity of 
Trial Justice he has tried more than eight 
thousand criminal cases. For five years he 
represented this district in the House of Rep- 
resentatives, and for one year was State Sena- 
tor. He has been Deputy Sheriff for three 
years, Postmaster for eight years, chairman of 
the Board of Selectmen for twelve years, and 
for three decades he served as chairman of the 
annual town meetings. Deeply interested in 
advancing the welfare of his native town and 
county, he has been a promoter of the erection 
of public buildings, and has advocated the im- 
provement of highways, the construction of 
railways, and the establishment of the present 
system of sewers and water-works. 

A man of unusual force of character, inde- 
pendent and self-reliant, he has splendid 
friends and warm enemies, the common lot of 
men with more than one idea. He is temper- 
ate in habits, generous, and sympathetic. In 
politics he is a devoted Republican, while his 
religious creed is quite liberal. 






ILLIAM E. ANDERSON, a thriv- 
ig dairy farmer of New Braintree, 
son of Charles and Mary (Robinson) 
Anderson, was born in East Brookfield, Febru- 
ary 13, 1836. The great-grandfather, Will- 



iam Anderson, a native of Glasgow, Scotland, 
resided for a time in Ireland, where he either 
learned the weaver's trade or followed it as a 
journeyman. Coming to America afterward, 
he settled in New Braintree as a pioneer, and 
purchased of one Shaw, who was the first man 
hanged in Worcester, the farm now owned by 
William E. Anderson. Wolves were so nu- 
merous and troublesome then that one of his 
daughters was chased in broad daylight by a 
number of them. At the same time salmon in 
the river were easily shot. William Anderson 
lived to be over eighty years old, and was 
buried with the rites of the Masonic order, to 
which he belonged. 

John Anderson, the grandfather, was born 
upon this farm, May 13, 1755. Succeeding to 
the ownership of two-thirds of the original 
tract bought by his father, he was engaged in 
farming upon his own account from the time 
of inheriting the property until his death, 
which occurred March 4, 1822. He enlisted 
in the American army, and served in all for fif- 
teen months in the Revolutionary War. He 
was a member of the Congregational church, 
and his opinions in religious matters were very 
pronounced. He married Phoebe Barr, who, 
born June 17, 1770, died January 3, 1844. 
She was the mother of eleven children, of 
whom nine grew to maturity and none are liv- 
ing. Charles Anderson, son of John, was 
born at the homestead June 5, 1804. He pos- 
sessed considerable mechanical genius, which 
he applied to operating and repairing mill ma- 
chinery, being employed at different times in 
grist-mills, cotton and woollen factories in 
Ware, Worcester, Spencer, and East Brook- 
field. Returning to the homestead in 1850, 
he cultivated his farm for the rest of his life, 
and was killed by falling from a building, May 
27, 1869. His wife, Mary, who was born in 
Richmond, N. H., August 9, 1809, became the 
mother of seven children, of whom one died in 
infancy. The others were: William E., Mary 
E., Phoebe M., Almira F., Mary J., and 
Abbie E. Of these, Mary E. and Almira F. 
are no longer living. Phoebe M. resides in 
Ware; Mary J. resides in North Brookfield; 
and Abbie E. lives in Hartford, Conn. The 
mother died April 9, 1S90. Excepting one or 



124 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



two years, during which she belonged to the 
church in Warren, she was a member of the 
East Congregational Church of Ware for sixty- 
three years. 

William E. Anderson was educated in the 
schools of Ware and New Braintree. He has 
resided here since he was fourteen years old, 
assisting his father until the latter's death. 
Having then succeeded to the homestead, he is 
now the owner of two hundred acres of land, 
constituting one of the oldest farms in town. 
He keeps twenty cows, and sometimes ships as 
high as four hundred and fifty cans of milk per 
month. The present dwelling was built by 
his grandfather in 1796, and is the second 
house erected upon the same site. 

At West Brookfield, in 1859, Mr. Anderson 
contracted his first marriage with Augusta F. 
Bridges, of that town, who was born in Graf- 
ton. A second marriage on December 11, 
1878, united him with Abbie E. Smith, 
who was born in West Windsor, Vt. , July 
29, 1850. She has given birth to five chil- 
dren, namely: Frederick, on October 1, 1880; 
Gertrude V., November 9, 1883; Edna M., 
March 26, 1885; Grace E., December 12, 
1 886; and Ethel V., May 8, 1888, who died 
August 19 of the same year. Politically, 
Mr. Anderson is a Republican, but he has no 
aspirations for public office. He is a member 
of the Congregational church, and Mrs. Ander- 
son is an attendant with him. 



-OHAN OTTO ExMANUEL TROTZ, 
a highly respected citizen of Worces- 
ter, was born in Stockholm, Sweden, 
March 6, i860, son of Carl Otto and 
Brones (Lowen) Trotz. The Trotz family is 
one of distinction in Sweden, its head having 
been raised to nobility five generations ago 
under King Charles X. Carl Otto Trotz was 
a civil officer and a large landholder. The 
Lowen family has been and now is among the 
largest holders of entailed estates in Sweden. 

Having duly attended the public schools of 
Stockholm and graduated at the high school, 
Johan Otto Emanuel Trotz in 1883 graduated 
at the Royal School of Mines in Stockholm. 



Consequent upon that event he was engaged 
for a short time at the Scientific School of 
Mining. Then he was the superintendent of 
the Iggessund Iron and Steel Works for two 
years. Leaving this place, after having gained 
some valuable experience, he entered the em- 
ploy of the Surahammar Iron and Steel Works, 
which is located in the middle part of Sweden. 
Here he remained for a little over a year, a 
part of the time being engaged in making geo- 
logical surveys in the Province of Dalcarlia. 
The ability and skill he displayed in these two 
positions now procured for him the coveted 
privilege of travelling abroad at the expense 
and under the direction of the government, to 
study technical and scientific problems as 
worked out in other lands. Previous to this 
he had been one of the favored pupils chosen 
annually from among the graduates of the 
Royal School of Mines by the Jernkontoret, an 
association of iron-masters. These students 
remain under salary, being subject to the call 
of any member of the association. Needless 
to say, only young men of unusual promise are 
selected for this honor. Mr. Trotz's grant per- 
mitted him to visit both the continent of Europe 
and the United States. Upon coming to this 
country he visited Worcester, which offered 
him such inducements that, contrary to his 
previous plans, he has remained here ever 
since. In the latter part of 1887 he engaged 
with the Washburn & Moen Manufacturing 
Company as a chemist. At the present time 
he is metallurgical engineer for this company 
and the superintendent of steel works. In 
both these positions he has demonstrated re- 
markable ability as well as the most thorough 
and scientific technical training. 

Mr. Trotz was married on June 7, 1890, to 
Selma P. Ahlstrom. An esteemed Mason, he 
had received his initiatory degrees before com- 
ing to America. He is a member of the 
Mechanical and Mining Engineering Societies 
of Sweden, of the American Institute of Min- 
ing Engineers, of the American Chemical 
Association ; and he is the president of the 
Swedish Mercantile Co-operative Association 
and vice-president of the Swedish Razor Com- 
pany of Worcester. Both he and his wife 
attend the Lutheran church. 




JONATHAN P. DANA. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



127 



'ONATHAN PRATT DANA, a repre- 
sentative man of Oxford, son of Will- 
iam and Harriet (Pratt) Dana, was 
born in this town, August 30, 1812. 
Both parents, the paternal great-grandfather, 
Phineas, and the paternal grandfather, John, 
were natives of Oxford. John Dana, born 
November 18, 17.38, was a prosperous farmer, 
served as Selectman and Town Treasurer, and 
was a Deacon of the Congregational church 
for many years. The maiden name of his 
wife was Hannah Humphrey. William Dana, 
father of Jonathan P., was born August 16, 
1785. Beginning when he was a young man, 
he followed farming until his death, which 
occurred in 18 18. His wife, who was a 
daughter of Naham Pratt, of Oxford, became 
the mother of four children ; namely, Jonathan 
P., Sarah Howe, Alonzo Humphrey, and 
Rufus Rosseter Dana. Of these, the only 
survivor is Jonathan P., the subject of this 
sketch. The parents attended the Congrega- 
tional church. 

When seven years old, Jonathan Pratt 
Dana was bound out to a farmer, who gave 
him little opportunity for obtaining an edu- 
cation. Upon reaching his majority he laid 
aside his farming implements in order to over- 
come his educational defects. Of the suc- 
ceeding ten years, which were spent in the 
school-room, a considerable portion of the 
period was passed by him in the capacity of 
teacher. He was particularly successful in 
managing refractory schools requiring a strict 
disciplinarian as well as a competent instruc- 
tor. While pursuing that calling, his spare 
time was spent in perfecting himself in the 
higher branches of learning. A too close ap- 
plication to study, however, proved injurious 
to his health; and he was at length forced to 
resume agricultural occupation as a means of 
recuperating. Hiring a farm, he began its 
cultivation upon scientific principles. His 
venture proved so successful that at the end 
of the first year he concluded to buy the prop- 
erty. Some twelve years later he sold that 
farm, and purchased a portion of his present 
property. Having enlarged this from time to 
time since then, he now has a large and pro- 
ductive farm. He also owns several other 



tracts of land, besides a number of tenement 
houses in Oxford. He was one of the organ- 
izers and president of the Oxford Agricultural 
Society. Also, for many years he was a 
member of the School Committee and of the 
Board of Assessors; while he refused to be a 
candidate for any other town office. He is a 
Justice of the Peace, and has settled many es- 
tates, having had several upon his hands at 
one time. Mr. Dana led the choir of the 
Methodist Episcopal church for a number of 
years. In religious belief he is a Congre- 
gationalism Now eighty-six years old, he 
shows the vigor and activity of a much younger 
man. 




EONARD FAIRBANKS was for many 
years an esteemed resident of Milford. 
Born in Worcester on September 
11, 1820, he was a son of Leonard 
and Keziah (Harding) Fairbanks. He came 
to Milford in November, 1839, and started in 
the cabinet-making business here. In connec- 
tion therewith he soon opened an undertaking 
establishment, assisted by J. M. Wood, who 
was employed by him from the start, and who 
made the first caskets used here. In 1883 his 
health failed, and he sold out the business to 
Messrs. Wood and Nye. 

Besides having been a comrade of Post No. 
22, G. A. R., Mr. Fairbanks was connected 
with three local bodies of Masons. He was a 
Past High Priest of Mount Lebanon Chapter 
and Past Commander of Milford Council. For 
many years he was a trustee of Vernon Grove 
Cemetery. The funeral exercises were held 
under the auspices of the Masons. Mr. Fair- 
banks was a man of most exemplary habits. 
His friend and pastor, the Rev. Mr. Wood- 
bury, remarked: "I could wish for no better 
character for my son to pattern." Possessing 
a most companionable disposition, it was said 
that every child in Milford loved him. At 
the same time that he was a successful and 
prosperous business man, he was sympathetic 
to those less fortunate. The owner of several 
tenements, it is related that he never asked a 
tenant for his rent. On one occasion, when 
asked why he did not take measures to collect 



128 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the amount due by a tenant who was several 
years in arrear, he replied, " Oh, well, he 
would pay me if he could." The man did 
eventually pay the whole amount, and it is 
further stated that Mr. Fairbanks never lost a 
dollar of rent by his leniency. 

While a remarkably well-informed man, his 
tastes were domestic. Yet, although he de- 
clined public office, he took an active interest 
in town affairs, was a liberal contributor to 
every progressive movement in Milford, in- 
cluding those for the building of Music and 
Memorial Halls; and he served the town on 
various committees. On July 19, 1894, after 
a few days' illness he passed away, regretted 
by all who knew him. 

Mr. Fairbanks was three times married. 
On the first occasion he wedded Sarah Cobb, 
who was a daughter of Elmer and Sylvia John- 
son Cobb, and had no children. The second 
wife was Sarah, daughter of Robert and Mary 
(Franklin) Pendleton, and who was born in 
Ashford, Conn. The third wife, a native of 
Unity, N. H., was Amanda, daughter of Robert 
and Sophia Clark. By this last marriage there 
was one child, Abbie Augusta, who, born No- 
vember 16, 1871, died on July 1, 1877. 




D. LOOMIS, a retired busi- 
ness man of Millbury, son of Roswell 
Dennis Loomis, was born in 
Georgia, Vt, May 20, 1832. The 
grandfather, Roswell Loomis, a native of 
Ohio, after his marriage removed to Vermont, 
where he was prosperously engaged as a farmer 
and cattle drover for many years. He died at 
St. Albans, that State, in 1852, at the ad- 
vanced age of fourscore and two years. His 
wife, Eunice Odell Loomis, who came from 
Ohio, bore him two sons and two daughters. 
Lyman, the eldest son, died of small-pox in 
Montreal, Canada, where he had charge of a 
drove of his father's cattle. The wife had 
survived him a number of years, when she died 
at a venerable age. 

Roswell D. Loomis, who was born in Ver- 
mont, May 16, 1809, spent a large part of his 
life at St. Albans, and subsequently died 
there, March 22, 185 1. For several years he 



served as Colonel in a company of Vermont 
militia. On June 30, 1831, he married Maria 
L. Tuller, a daughter of Ornon and Persis 
(Hyde) Tuller, of St. Albans. They reared 
six children, namely: Rodney D., the subject 
of this sketch; Julia K., who died April 2, 
1870, at Eureka, Wis., the wife of George 
Rye; Lyman B. , born February 2, 1836, who 
was for some years an engineer on the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway, and died in 1872, at the 
home of his mother in Brasher Falls, N. Y. ; 
Henry C, born March 20, 1838, now a mill- 
wright at Massena Springs, N.Y. , who is mar- 
ried and has one daughter and two sons; 
Hiram H., born in August, 1840, now a loco- 
motive engineer on the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way, who is married and has five children ; and 
Arthur B., born June 14, 1843, who died at 
the age of three years. After the death of her 
husband the mother married Luther Hulbard, 
and afterward lived at Brasher Falls until her 
death on January 31, 1876, at the age of sixty- 
six years. 

Rodney D. Loomis attended the district 
school at St. Albans until he was thirteen 
years old, and then studied for three months in 
an academy at St. Albans Bay. At the age 
of fifteen years he began a three years' appren- 
ticeship in the shop of James M. Haynes, of 
St. Albans Bay. Having learned the trade, 
he remained with his employer five more years. 
Then he was in Ottawa, Canada, until the 1st 
of November, 1862, when he located in Mill- 
bury, and, securing a position with the firm of 
C. D. Morse & Co., sash and blind makers, 
continued with them for eighteen months. 
In December, 1863, he enlisted as a private in 
Company C, Fifty-seventh Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Infantry, which afterward formed a part 
of the Army of the Potomac. Three months 
later, in the battle of Spottsylvania Court- 
house, he was wounded by a ball sent by a 
sharpshooter through his left ankle. Pie was 
left on the field for a number of hours, and 
when surgical aid was obtained it was found 
necessary to amputate the left leg just below 
the knee, so that now he has to depend upon 
an artificial leg in walking. As soon as able 
he returned to Millbury, and, resuming work 
at his trade, continued until his retirement 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



129 



from active life in 1S90. In politics Mr. 
Loomis is a stanch Republican. A prominent 
member of the George A. Custer Post, No. 70, 
G. A. R., he served it as Adjutant for six- 
years, and was the Commander for five years. 



SWju 



ILES BLODGETT, formerly a promi- 
% |^> I nent agriculturist of Warren, was 
^— *- born December 27, 1829, in Stafford, 
Conn. His father, Captain Alden Blodgett, 
was a descendant on his mother's side from 
John and Priscilla (Mullins) Alden, who came 
to America in the "Mayflower," and were 
married in 1623 in Plymouth, Mass. While 
living in Stafford, Captain Blodgett, who had 
commanded a company of local militia, mar- 
ried Elvira Cady, of that town, and subse- 
quently removed to South Warren, Mass. A 
short time later he came with his family to 
Coy's Hill, in Warren, and here settled on the 
farm property that his son Giles afterward in- 
herited. A man of ability and influence, he 
rendered the town excellent service as Select- 
man and in other capacities. 

Giles Blodgett attended the public schools 
of Warren. On reaching his majority he 
caught the gold fever, then raging in all parts 
of New England, and went to California. 
During the three years that he remained on 
the Pacific coast he was fairly successful in 
his ventures. Subsequently, returning to the 
paternal homestead, he resumed agriculture, 
and followed it successfully, omitting one 
year, for the remainder of his life. The year 
referred to was spent in the Civil War with 
Company K of the Forty-second Massachusetts 
Volunteer Infantry. Under General N. P. 
Banks he was at New Orleans, and he helped 
to lay and guard pontoon bridges in that vicin- 
ity. On his farm of two hundred acres be was 
engaged extensively in general farming and 
dairying. His improvements on the property, 
and his skilful management generally, have 
rendered it one of the most valuable estates 
in the district. 

Mr. Blodgett was a firm supporter of the 
principles of the Republican party. For two 
years he served most satisfactorily on the 
Board of Selectmen. He was a member of 



the Masonic Lodge in Warren and of the Clara 
Barton Post, G. A. R. On April 19, 1865, 
he married Emily M. Gilbert, of Warren. 
Born in Enfield, she is a daughter of William 
S. and Maria (Cummings) Gilbert, natives re- 
spectively of Enfield and Warren. Three 
children were born of the union, namely: 
Emma M., now a teacher in Springfield, 
Mass. ; and Edith F. and Ralph G., both re- 
siding with their mother on the home farm. 
The father died on the homestead, July 6, 
1895. Mrs. Blodgett and her children belong 
to the Congregational church, of which Mr. 
Blodgett was an active member. 



fHOMAS B. ROBINSON, a leading 
farmer of Paxton and the present chair- 
man of the town's Board of Assessors, 
was born in Oakham, Mass., March 7, 1823, 
son of William and Jane (Bourne) Robinson. 
His father, who died in 1837, was a resident 
of Oakham from his infancy. His mother was 
a native of Cohasset, Mass. After attending 
the district schools of Oakham for the usual 
period, Thomas B. Robinson began to assist 
his father on the farm, where in time he be- 
came a good agriculturist. At the. age of 
twenty-nine he left his native town and went 
to Worcester to take charge of the Rejoice 
Newton farm. This he managed successfully 
for sixteen years. In 1868 he came to Paxton, 
which has since been his home, and where he 
has since been engaged in genera] farming. 

On November 26, 1846, Mr. Robinson was 
married to Mary J. Stone, a native of Oakham. 
Both of Mrs. Robinson's parents were born in 
Oakham; and her paternal grandfather, Al- 
pheus Stone, was an early settler in that town. 
Her father was a prominent man in Oakham 
and a progressive farmer. He served his town 
as Selectman and as Assessor of Taxes. Mr. 
and Mrs. Robinson happily celebrated their 
golden wedding in 1896. The following 
named children have been born to them : 
Fannie M., who is the wife of Charles E. 
Graton, of Spencer; Charles O. , Albert M. , 
Frank K., and Lurena, all of whom reside in 
Worcester; and Herbert S., who is the libra- 
rian of the Paxton Public Library. The father 



i3° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



earlier in his life served the town as Assessor 
for a period of ten consecutive years, and for a 
part of the time he was the chairman of the 
board. Also, for several years he was High- 
way Surveyor, and for two years he was Select- 
man. In the spring of 1897 he was again 
elected to the Assessor's office, and upon the 
organization of the board was chosen chair- 
man. While a Republican in politics, he 
favors every movement likely to promote the 
public welfare. 




ARON H. MARBLE, one of the best 
known residents of Charlton Depot, 
was born in this town, August 18, 
1 8 16, son of Aaron and Sally (Ham- 
mond) Marble. He comes of Welsh origin. 
His grandfather, Aaron Marble, first, who 
came from Sutton, Mass., served as a soldier 
in the Revolutionary War. Aaron Marble, 
second, the father, in his younger days was a 
scythe-maker in Charlton. At a later date 
he engaged in farming. When he died in 
1865 he was over seventy-seven years old. He 
served with ability as a member of the Board 
of Selectmen, and represented his district in 
the legislature for two terms. His wife, 
Sally, was a native of Charlton. 

Having acquired his elementary education 
in the common schools of Charlton, Aaron H. 
Marble attended the Leicester Academy for 
several terms. Subsequently he taught school 
in Charlton and Oxford for a number of win- 
ters. He has, however, devoted his attention 
chiefly to agriculture, in which he has realized 
a substantial pecuniary success. He is one of 
the most prominent of the well-to-do farmers 
of this town. 

Mr. Marble is unmarried. He was a mem- 
ber of the lower house of the General Court 
in 1858, serving upon the Committee on Pub- 
lic Lands. For three years during the trying 
times of the Civil War he was a member of 
the Board of Selectmen. He has also served 
as an Assessor, and was for a number of terms 
upon the School Committee. In politics he is 
a Republican. He is highly esteemed as a 
public-spirited citizen, who has labored effec- 
tively for the best interests of the community. 



Mr. Marble is a member of the First Uni- 
versalis! Society and a liberal contributor 
toward its support. 






DAMS FRANKLIN BROWN, a lead- 
g lawyer of Westboro, Mass., is 
prominent in the business, politi- 
cal, and fraternal circles of this 
part of Worcester County. He was born Feb- 
ruary 4, 1857, in Littleton, Middlesex 
County, Mass., a son of James Madison and 
Amanda Melvina (Pingry) Brown, his father 
being a prosperous farmer of that place. Mr. 
Brown's early years were spent on the home 
farm, and his elementary education was ob- 
tained in the district schools. After leaving 
school he was employed some twelve years in 
shoe factories in Westboro and Worcester. 
During the latter part of this time, inspired 
by a worthy ambition to prepare himself for a 
professional career, he spent the required ten 
hours a day in the shoe shop, and devoted six 
of the remaining hours to the study of law. 
In 1891, having successfully passed a most 
rigid examination, he was admitted to the 
Worcester County bar, and immediately 
opened an office in Westboro. Soon after- 
ward he established an office in Worcester 
also, but the business in his first office in- 
creased so rapidly and took up so much of his 
time that he gave up the one in Worcester, 

Mr. Brown is deeply interested in Masonry, 
and has done much to advance the interests of 
the various lodges with which he is connected. 
He joined the ancient craft in 1880 at Siloam 
Lodge, F. &'A. M., of Westboro, and seven 
years later he was made Worshipful Master of 
the lodge. He subsequently became a mem- 
ber of Houghton Chapter, R. A. M., of Marl- 
boro; of Hiram Council, R. & S. M., of 
Worcester; Worcester County Commandery, 
K. T. ; Worcester Lodge of Perfection ; God- 
dard Council, Princes of Jerusalem ; Lawrence 
Chapter, Rose Croix, of Worcester; Massa- 
chusetts Consistory of Boston, in which he 
took the thirty-second degree; and Aleppo 
Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of 
Boston. He was one of the organizers of 
Bethany Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, 




ADAMS F. BROWN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



*33 



of Westboro, of which he was third Worthy 
Patron two years. In 1892 he was made As- 
sociate Grand Patron of the order in Massa- 
chusetts, and in 1893 was elected Grand Pa- 
tron. In 1891 and 1892 he served ably as 
District Deputy Grand Master of the Twen- 
tieth Masonic District. He is also prominent 
in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
being Past Noble Grand of Hockomocko 
Lodge. He is a member of Westboro Grange, 
P. of H. ; and an associate member of the 
A. G. Biscoe Post, G. A. R. 

Mr. Brown is actively interested in public 
affairs. He is now chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen of Westboro, and is a member of 
the Councillor and Congressional District 
Committees. When thirteen years old he 
united with the Baptist church, of which he 
has since been a consistent and faithful mem- 
ber. On May 8, 1894, he married Miss Ma- 
halah Annie Adams, of Houlton, Me., a 
daughter of Daniel and Mahalah Annie 
(Harris) Adams. Mr. and Mrs. Brown have 
two sons, Rolf Eric, born March 24, 1896, 
and Paul Erwin, born November 11, 1898. 




|DWARD AKERS, senior member of the 
well-known firm of Akers & Taylor, 
manufacturers of satinet and woollen 
goods at Charlton City, was born September 
16, 1829, in Granby, Hampshire County, son 
of Henry and Achsah (Hunt) Akers. His 
father, who was a lifelong resident of New 
England, served in the War of 181 2, and 
afterward located in Granby, where he died at 
an early age. 

Edward Akers is practically a self-educated 
man, his schooling having been limited to a 
few terms in the district schools of Palmer, 
Mass., while he was but a small boy. Thrown 
upon his own resources by his father's death, 
when a lad of nine years he began working in 
a cotton-mill at Ludlow, Mass. From that 
place he went to a cotton factory in Thorndike, 
in the town of Palmer. A few years later he 
secured a better paying situation in a woollen- 
mill at Monson, and was afterward employed 
in a woollen-mill at Stafford Springs, Conn., 
as foreman of the weaving department. From 



Stafford Springs he went West, but, after 
spending a year in Illinois and Wisconsin, he 
returned to Worcester County, Massachusetts, 
where, in the town of Auburn, he established 
himself as a manufacturer of satinet. On Jan- 
uary 10, 1875, Mr. Akers began the manufact- 
ure of satinets at Charlton City, having as a 
partner Nathan Norris, who became junior 
member of the firm of Akers & Norris. After 
three years the partnership was dissolved, and 
Mr. Akers carried on the business alone for 
several years. In 1885 the present firm was 
formed, with F. S. Taylor as a copartner. 
Messrs. Akers & Taylor carry on an extensive 
and lucrative business in the making of sati- 
nets and woollen goods, the three mills com- 
prising their plant being all located in Charl- 
ton. Many men are kept busily employed, the 
firm's pay-roll averaging one hundred and fifty 
men. When Mr. Akers came to this city a 
quarter of a century ago, very little manufact- 
uring was done here; but through his advice 
and influence the town's manufacturing inter- 
ests and resources have been much developed. 
A man of energy and executive ability and an 
able financier, he has met with eminent suc- 
cess in all his undertakings, and is a worthy 
representative of the self-made men of New 
England. 

Mr. Akers is a Republican in politics, and 
is actively interested in all things calculated 
to benefit the town and county in which he re- 
sides. He served as Selectman of Charlton 
for four years, and he was the chairman of the 
board for a part of the time. A member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, he has served 
the society in many official positions. On 
January 1, 1852, he married Melina Parsons, 
of Alpheus. Of their three children, two are 
living: Mrs. F. S. Taylor, of Worcester; and 
Mrs. Harry Grimwade, of Charlton City. 



"|p\ANIEL WEBSTER WIGHT, a 
1=1 thriving farmer of Sturbridge and 
^ JCpJ a veteran of the Civil War, son 
of Winthrop and Louisa (Brown) 
Wight, was born in this town, February 14, 
1836. His grandparents were Alpheus and 
Miriam (Belknap) Wight, of Sturbridge. Al- 



134 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



pheus operated a grist-mill besides carrying on 
farming. He was the father of fourteen chil- 
dren. 

Winthrop Wight, third son of Alpheus, was 
born at the homestead, November 7, 1807. 
After succeeding to the farm in 1851, he cul- 
tivated it industriously until his death, which 
occurred on August 4, 1873. Originally a 
Whig in politics, he later became a Republi- 
can. His wife, Louisa, who was born in 
Southbridge, February 18, 1806, had six chil- 
dren, of whom the only survivor is Daniel W. 
The others were: Caroline L., born January 
28, 1830, who died January 2, 1851; Delia 
E., born October 2, 1831, who died March 6, 
1832; Delia E., second, born August 11, 
1833, who married a Mr. Hunt, April 17, 
1858, and died December 21, i860; Mary A., 
born September 25, 1838, who died July 11, 
1 86 1 ; and Levins R., born November 24, 
1842, who married Mary A. Allen, November 
17, 1869, and died July 24, 1870. The 
mother died August 10, 1874. Both parents 
were members of the Congregational church. 

Daniel Webster Wight acquired his educa- 
tion in the district schools of Sturbridge. He 
resided at home until twenty-two years old, 
when he entered upon an apprenticeship to the 
tinner's trade. Afterward he worked at this 
trade until August, 1862, when he enlisted in 
Company F, Fifty-first Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Volunteers, under Captain Baldwin. 
While serving in the Civil War he partici- 
pated in the battles of Kingston and White- 
hall. After receiving his discharge he 
worked at his trade in Ware and Worcester, 
Mass. In 1865 he engaged in business for 
himself in Lowell, Mass. Four years after 
he went to Amherst, Mass., where he was a 
member of the hardware firm of Dickinson & 
Wight for a time. On October 1, 1873, he 
returned to the homestead in Sturbridge, of 
which he is now the proprietor. The property 
contains about eighty acres of excellent land. 
Various improvements have been made upon it 
since it came into his hands. 

On October 12, 1865, Mr. Wight married 
Julia D. Allen, a daughter of Charles G. and 
Mary (Dunton) Allen. He has two sons: 
Charles Winthrop, born October 24, 1S68; 



and Alpheus E. , born June 10, 1871. Charles 
VV. Wight on May 6, 1896, married Agnes 
Kerr. He now has one son, Everett Allen 
Wight, born March 11, 1897. On June 22, 
1898, Alpheus married Edna F. Merrill. Mr. 
Wight, Sr. , has served as Assessor, Overseer 
of the Poor, and in other town offices, and con- 
tinues to take a lively interest in the general 
welfare of the town. 




EORGE P. KING, one of Barre's 
•> I well-to-do residents, was born in this 
town, March 29, 1833, son of Will- 
iam P. and Caroline L. (Morgan) King. The 
paternal great-grandfather, William King, 
born in Danvers, Mass., December 29, 1744, 
settled in Barre soon after his marriage, and 
died here, March 17, 1813. In June, 1775, he 
married Sarah Clark, who was born in Sher- 
born, Mass., July 16, 1756. Of their six 
children, Samuel King, the grandfather of 
George P., was born in Barre, August 25, 
1778. He spent the active period of his life 
upon a farm located about four miles west of 
the village. Politically, he was a Whig and 
in religious belief a Universalist. His death 
occurred March 3, 1836. He married Sophia 
Clark, who died March 27, 1877, at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-three years and seventeen 
days. William P. King, George P. King's 
father, was born in Barre, October 24, 1807. 
In early life he followed the mason's trade. 
Later he was industriously engaged in agri- 
culture until his death, which occurred August 
28, 1888, in his eighty-first year. In politics 
he was successively a Whig and a Republican, 
and he attended the Unitarian church. His 
wife, Caroline, who was born in Brimfield, 
Mass., May 8, 1807, became the mother of 
five children, one of whom died in infancy. 
The surviving children are: George P., the 
subject of this sketch ; Caroline E., the widow 
of Baxter C. Swan, late of Philadelphia; Ellen 
L. , the widow of Fred Snow, late of Green- 
wich, Mass. ; and Cora L. , the widow of Will- 
iam Kellogg, late of Barre. The mother died 
July 13, 1896. 

Having been educated in Barre, George P. 
King resided at home, assisting on the farm 




WILLIAM H. COOK. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



J 37 



until he was twenty-one years old. He then 
came to the village, and there was afterward 
employed at various kinds of work until 1862. 
In this year he went to Fitchburg, and was 
connected with the firm of Swan & Clark, 
manufacturers of Shaker hoods, until 1870. 
Next year he went to Philadelphia, where for 
the succeeding six or seven years he was in the 
furniture business as a member of the firm of 
Swan, Clark & Co. After withdrawing from 
that firm he returned to the homestead in 
order to care for his parents during their last 
days. Thereafter he managed the farm with 
success until 1S90, in which year he moved to 
the village. Since then he has lived here in 
retirement. He is financially interested in 
the Barre Water Works and in the First Na- 
tional Bank, of which he is a director. 

On September 2, 1866, Mr. King was 
united in marriage with Mary Eaton. Born in 
Phillipston, Mass., July 18, 1835, she is a 
daughter of Avery and Lydia (Brown) Eaton, 
natives respectively of Phillipston and Lexing- 
ton. Mr. Eaton, who was a farmer, died at 
the age of sixty-two years, and Mrs. Eaton 
at the age of eighty-eight. In politics Mr. 
King acts with the Republican party. He 
attends the Unitarian church. 




ON. WILLIAM HENRY COOK, 
editor of the Milford Journal at Mil- 
ford, Worcester County, Mass., was 
born January 7, 1843, in Benning- 
ton, Vt., a son of James I. C. Cook and 
Marion E. Cook. He comes of early Colonial 
stock, being a lineal descendant of Aaron 
Cook, who in Dorchester, in May, 1635, was 
made a freeman of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony. 

Aaron Cook afterward removed to North- 
ampton, where he was a pioneer settler. 
Several generations of his descendants were 
born and made their home in Hampshire 
County, and there Coleman Cook, Sr., was a 
lifelong resident. Coleman Cook, Jr., son of 
Coleman, Sr., and grandfather of William H., 
was born in the historic town of Hadley, 
Mass., January 25, 1785, but moved from 
there to Vermont when a comparatively young 



man, and died in Chester, that State, Septem- 
ber 3, 1872. His wife, Eunice Green, was 
born and reared in what is now a part of 
Springfield, Mass. 

James I. C. Cook was born October 13, 
1817, in Bellows Falls, Vt., at the "yellow 
tavern," of which his father was then "ye 
landlord." He there attended the district 
school until about thirteen years old, when he 
entered the printing office, at Bellows Falls, 
of his brother, B. G. Cook, senior member of 
the firm of Cook & Taylor, with whom he 
served an apprenticeship. In 1835 he worked 
in the office of the Cheshire Republican at 
Keene, N.H. ; and in August, 1836, he began 
"sticking type" and "pulling" a hand press 
in the office of the Daily Whig at Troy, N. Y. , 
receiving eight dollars per week for all-night 
labor. In 1841 he secured work at his trade 
in Bennington, Vt., where the following 
year he became connected with the publish- 
ing of the State Banner. In 1859 ne t0 °k 
his eldest son, William H., into partnership, 
and continued the publication until 1870, 
when the Banner plant was sold. He came 
with his family to Milford in May, 1872, 
and with his two sons, William H. and 
George G. , purchased the Milford Journal 
newspaper and job printing plant. Here they 
have since carried on a thriving business, 
under the firm name of Cook & Sons. In 
1887 they established the Daily Journal. 

On October 13, 1841, Mr. J. I. C. Cook 
was married at Putney, Vt. , by the Rev. 
Amos Foster, to Marion E. Robertson. She 
was born near Halifax, N.S., of Scotch par- 
entage, her mother having been born in Edin- 
burgh, Scotland, and her father in a suburb 
of that city. The wedding journey of J. I. C. 
Cook and wife from Putney to Troy, N.Y. , 
was made in a private conveyance across 
the Green Mountains, and occupied three 
days. They passed through the town of Strat- 
ton, where during the campaign of 1840 the 
Whigs held an immense mass meeting and 
barbecue, an occasion made memorable by the 
presence of some of the most noted orators of 
those days, including among others Daniel 
Webster. Mrs. Cook died May 8, 18S8, leav- 
ing three children: Ella J., who lives with 



'38 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



her father; William H. ; and George G. The 
latter was Postmaster of Milford under Presi- 
dent Harrison, and was reappointed by Presi- 
dent McKinley. 

Their other child, James Edwin, died in 
early life. On October 13, 1897, Mr. James 
I. C. Cook celebrated the eightieth anniver- 
sary of his birth in an informal manner, re- 
ceiving the personal congratulations of many 
of his friends, and from the employees of the 
Journal establishment a handsome piece of cut 
glassware and a bunch of eighty pinks. In 
politics he has been a stanch Republican 
since the formation of the party, but previous 
to that time he was a Whig. From April, 
1861, until his removal to Milford he was 
Postmaster at Bennington, Vt., his three com- 
missions received during that time being 
signed by Presidents Lincoln, Johnson, and 
Grant. 

William H. Cook gleaned his early educa- 
tion in the district school, and when a little 
fellow of nine years learned the art of typeset- 
ting in the office of the Vermont State Banner, 
of which his' father was associate proprietor 
and editor. He was an ambitious boy, brought 
up to habits of industry and thrift, and, in 
order to increase his supply of pocket money, 
used to carry the Banner to the village sub- 
scribers for the sum of twenty-five cents per 
week, making his rounds with the papers 
under his arm in sun, rain, or snow. When 
sixteen years old he became a partner of his 
father, and assumed the editorship of the 
paper, being the youngest editor in the State, 
if not in all New England. He was present 
at the organization of the Vermont Press As- 
sociation, and has since been prominent in 
the Massachusetts Press Association, of which 
he was two years president. He was one of 
the six to organize the Suburban Press Asso- 
ciation, of which he was the first president, an 
office that he filled three years, and has been 
president of the Massachusetts Republican 
Editorial Association from its inception. 

Mr. Cook is an active worker in the Repub- 
lican ranks, and has taken a deep interest in 
public matters from his boyhood. While in 
Vermont he was frequently a delegate to Re- 
publican conventions, and soon after becom- 



ing of age was chairman of the Bennington 
County Republican Committee. In 1876, 
four years after coming to Massachusetts, and 
again in 1877, he was elected a Representa- 
tive to the Massachusetts legislature. In 
1896, 1897, and 1898 he was a member of the 
Massachusetts Senate, and served on impor- 
tant committees during the three terms, the 
second year rendering inestimable service to 
his professional brethren by his influential 
labors in behalf of the new newspaper libel 
law then enacted by the General Court. Fra- 
ternally, he is a Mason, belonging to Mount 
Anthony Lodge, No. 13, F. & A. M., of Ben- 
nington. 

On September 20, 1888, Mr. Cook married 
Mrs. Georgiana Fay, daughter of George 
Glackmeyer, of New York City. 




HARLES H. HARRIMAN, M.D., 
the oldest resident physician of Whit- 
insville, and who is well known in 
the medical fraternity throughout 
the county, was born in Goffstown, N. H., 
November 16, 1852, son of Warren and Sarah 
(Whipple) Harriman. His parents were of 
old New Hampshire stock. Of his two 
brothers, Benjamin F. served four years in the 
war of the Rebellion. The other, Edgar D. 
Harriman, is now engaged in the shoe business 
at Exeter, N. H. 

After graduating from the academic depart- 
ment of the Norwich (Vt. ) University, Charles 
H. Harriman began the study of medicine 
with Dr. L. B. How, of Manchester, N.H. 
In 1877 he graduated from the Medical School 
of Dartmouth College, and for several years 
following he was engaged in the practice of 
his profession in Hopkinton, N.H. Coming 
to Whitinsville in 1882, he settled here, and 
has since built up an extensive practice. He 
has won the esteem of all who have been his 
patients, and his skill is widely recognized by 
other physicians. He has served for six years 
on the Northbridge School Board, and in 1891 
he represented this district in the legislature, 
to which he was elected by a very flattering 
vote. He has been the only Democratic Rep- 
resentative sent to General Court from this 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'39 



district since Northbridge was incorporated. 
While there he served on the Committee on 
Public Health. 

The Doctor is an esteemed member of sev- 
eral fraternal organizations, namely: Granite 
Lodge, F. & A. M. ; St. Elmo Chapter, 
R. A. M. ; Worcester County Commandery, 
K. T. ; Aleppo Temple of the Mystic Shrine; 
the Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows, Fores- 
ters, Red Men, Knights of the Golden Eagle, 
and Decamus Chapter, Order of the Eastern 
Star. On October 18, 1877, he married Ser- 
villa M. Jones, of Goffstown, N. H. She has 
borne him one son, Willis Warren Harriman. 
Willis W. Harriman, now a youth of nineteen, 
who is still a student in the Whitinsville High 
School, has already exhibited unusual musical 
ability, and has written a number of musical 
compositions which promise much for the 
future. 



DWARD A. BATCHELLER, of North 
Brookfield, the chairman, the town's Se- 
lectman, and an energetic and enter- 
prising business man, was born in this town, 
March 31, 1849. A son of Alden Batcheller, 
he comes of pioneer stock. His paternal 
grandfather, Ora Batcheller, was an early set- 
tler in this section of Massachusetts. 

Alden Batcheller, who has spent his 
seventy-seven years of life in North Brook- 
field, is known throughout the community as 
one of its most valued and influential men. 
For many years he carried on a thriving trade 
as a lumber manufacturer and dealer, and in 
former years he had large interests in the lum- 
ber regions of Michigan. He has been inti- 
mately connected with the projects most calcu- 
lated to benefit the town, and was one of the 
chief promoters of the North Brookfield steam 
railway and of the North Brookfield water 
works. In the capacities of Selectman, Water 
Commissioner, and legislative Representative 
he has rendered excellent service. His wife, 
Harriet R. DeVolve Batcheller, died in June, 
1897, leaving three children, namely: Edward 
A., the subject of this biography; William 
H., of New York City; and Frank W., of 
Hartford, Conn. 



Edward A. Batcheller completed his early 
education in the North Brookfield High 
School. At an early age he began life for 
himself as a coal dealer, and followed it for 
three years. During the next two years he 
was engaged as a meat and provision dealer, 
and in 1872 or soon after he began dealing 
in ice. Commencing with fifty patrons or 
thereabouts, he gradually enlarged his ice 
business, and now supplies upward of six 
hundred persons with ice each season. For a 
number of years he has also carried on a sub- 
stantial lumber and wood business, meeting 
with a corresponding success. 

In politics Mr. Batcheller is a strong Re- 
publican, and since 1897 he has been one of 
the Selectmen of the town. An esteemed Odd 
Fellow, he belongs to Woodbine Lodge of this 
town ; and he is an active member of the First 
Congregational Church. He married Miss 
Ella M. Partridge, daughter of Silas and Ada- 
line Partridge, of Leicester, Mass. ; and he 
now has three children — Alice M., Gertrude 
N., and Mary E. 




ILLIAM H. BAKER, a well-known 
insurance man of Fitchburg, was 
born in Lunenburg, this county, 
March 22, 1849, son of William and Olive R. 
(Boutwell) Baker and a grandson of Jesse and 
Sophia (Wetherbee) Baker. His great-grand- 
father, Reuben Baker, who was. a Revolution- 
ary soldier, received a wound at the battle of 
Bunker Hill. 

Jesse Baker, who was a farmer and had a 
sawmill and grist-mill on Baker's Brook, died 
when his son William was seventeen years old. 
His wife was a daughter of David Wether- 
bee. Five generations of Wetherbee descend- 
ants have lived on the farm in Lunenburg. 
The first, Paul Wetherbee, who located there 
in 1745, was a son of Captain Ephraim 
Wetherbee, who was prominent at the incorpo- 
ration of the town in 1728. David Wetherbee 
was a Revolutionary soldier, and served with 
the army of the Revolution at the siege of 
Boston. The Wetherbee estate was devoted 
to genera] farming until about 1770. In that 
year the first flour-mill in this county was 



140 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



erected there, and it was in operation for more 
than a hundred years after. Jesse Baker's 
children were: William, the father of the sub- 
ject of this sketch; 'Martha A., the widow of 
Charles F. Rockwood, who was Registrar of 
Deeds at Fitchburg; Mary L. , who died about 
thirty years ago, and was the first wife of 
F. A. Whitney, of Leominster; and Charles, 
who died before his father. 

William Baker took charge of the farm and 
the mill after his father's death, which oc- 
curred in 1838. In 1862 he was appointed 
Assistant Assessor of Internal Revenue under 
Assessor Amasa Norcross, and he was obliged 
to devote the most of his time to the duties of 
his position. In 1872 the office of Assessor 
was abolished, and he was made Deputy Col- 
lector of Internal Revenue under B. F. 
Wallis. When this office was abolished in 
1878, he declined the offer of a similar office 
in Worcester, as it would necessitate his re- 
moval to that city. In 1879 he purchased the 
fire insurance agency of Silas Holman, and 
thereafter devoted his attention to that busi- 
ness. One of the original trustees of the 
Worcester North Savings Institution, which 
was incorporated in 1868, he was a member of 
the board up to the time of his death, and also 
served for many years on its Board of Invest- 
ment. He was one of the oldest directors of 
the Fitchburg Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, and after the death of Lewis H. Brad- 
ford, in 1887, was the vice-president and treas- 
urer for a year, when he found the duties too 
arduous and resigned. He was Selectman and 
Overseer of the Poor for several years, and 
served in other public capacities in Lunen- 
burg. In the State legislature of 1873 he was 
one of the Representatives from the district in- 
cluding Fitchburg, Leominster, Lunenburg, 
and Westminster. On September 10, 1896, 
while attending a meeting of the directors of 
the Fitchburg Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, he was seized with a fainting fit. Car- 
ried home, he rallied for a while, but died of 
heart failure a few days later. Ex-Congress- 
man Amasa Norcross, the president of the 
Worcester North Savings Institution and of 
the Fitchburg Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, said of him: " He was a valuable man 



for Lunenburg and for this community. He 
was faithful and trustworthy. My relations 
with him have been of a very agreeable and 
confidential character for more than forty 
years." He was seventy-five years old. On 
November 11, 1847, he was married to Olive 
Rebecca, daughter of Sewell Boutwell and 
sister of ex-Governor George S. Boutwell. 
The house to which he took his bride, and 
which was built in 1847, stands near the one 
in which he was born on the old Wetherbee 
farm. Mrs. Olive Baker is now seventy-six 
years old. Her three children are living. 
These are: William H., the subject of this 
sketch; Charles F., of the law firm of Nor- 
cross & Baker; and Edith B., who is a teacher 
in Cushing Academy at Ashburnham. 

William H. Baker studied civil engineering 
at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
graduating in 1869. He was engineer on the 
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad for 
nine years, was six years in Montana, one year 
in Mexico, and five years in Texas as chief en- 
gineer of railroad construction. Returning 
to Fitchburg in 1895, he soon became associ- 
ated with his father in the fire insurance busi- 
ness, to which he now gives all his time. He 
has been a member of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers since 1882. In politics he is 
a Republican. He joined the Masons and 
Odd Fellows in New Mexico, and he is an 
honorary member of the Webster Historical 
Society. 



THOMAS WEBB, the chairman of 
the Board of Selectmen of New Brain- 
tree, was born in Hardwick, September 
16, 1838, son of Jonathan and Mary 
(Page) Webb. The Webbs are descendants of 
the Winslows, who came over in the " May- 
flower." John Webb, the grandfather of Mr. 
Webb and a native of Cape Cod, became an 
early settler in Hardwick. He followed the 
trades of carpenter and cabinet-maker, in addi- 
tion to farming, during the active period of 
his life, which ended when he was eighty-two 
years old. Patriotic as well as industrious, he 
served as a soldier in the War of 18 12. The 
Christian name of his wife was Betsey. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



141 



Jonathan Webb, J. Thomas Webb's father, 
was born in Hardwick, July 29, 1791. In 
early life he was a school teacher. Later he 
was engaged in farming at the homestead, 
where he resided until 1849. Coming to New 
Braintree in that year, he spent the rest of his 
life upon the place which is now owned by his 
son, and known as Sunnyside Farm. He was a 
Captain in the State militia. In politics he 
supported the Republican party, and he was a 
member of the Congregational church. His 
wife, born in Hardwick, December 13, 1799, 
who died at the age of sixty-nine years, be- 
came the mother of eight children, three of 
whom are living, namely: John, a broker in 
New York City; Elisha, a manufacturer in 
West Brookfield ; and J. Thomas, the subject 
of this sketch. 

J. Thomas Webb was educated in the com- 
mon schools of Hardwick and New Braintree, 
and reared to farm life. He continued to as- 
sist his father until he received entire charge 
of the farm. Since then he has cultivated it 
industriously. Taking high rank among the 
dairymen of the locality, he keeps from fifty to 
sixty head of Holstein cattle, full bloods and 
grades; and he ships milk annually to the 
amount of about ten thousand cans. Sunny- 
side Farm, containing three hundred and 
twenty-five acres of desirable land, is regarded 
as one of the best in the town. The build- 
ings, spacious, substantial, and in excellent 
repair, are characteristic of a well-to-do 
Worcester County agriculturist. On April 
28, 1873, Mr. Webb was united in marriage 
with Jennie Bowen. Born in Sturbridge, 
Mass., February 8, 1852, she is a daughter of 
Henry and Hannah Bowen. Mr. Bowen, who 
was a well-known horse dealer, died in Sep- 
tember, 1897, having survived his wife, who 
died March 3, 1887. Mr. and Mrs. Webb 
have had four children, two of whom died in 
infancy. The living are: Irving T., born 
June 5, 1 88 1 ; and Grace J., born June 16, 
1889. Politically, Mr. Webb is a Republi- 
can. He was formerly a member of the Board 
.of Assessors. A Selectman for the past eigh- 
teen years, he has been the chairman of the 
board for about eleven years. Both he and 
Mrs. Webb are prominent in social circles. 



The latter, an intellectual woman, possessing 
many admirable traits, is especially esteemed. 
Both attend the Universalist church. 




,ELSON LORING, who owns and occu- 
pies the old Loring farm in Barre, son 
of Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Wads- 
worth) Loring, was born where he 
now resides, January 10, 1821. His paternal 
grandfather, Israel Loring, a native of Massa- 
chusetts, who was a maltster in Rice village 
for some years, in 1792 settled upon the farm 
that is now his grandson's property; and he 
built the residence in 1795. Farming was his 
chief occupation until he was accidentally 
killed, at the age of sixty-five years. He at- 
tended the Unitarian church. His wife lived 
to the advanced age of ninety-six. They were 
the parents of eight children, none of whom 
are living. 

Nathaniel Loring, born in Barre, April 15, 
1785, and a millwright by trade, owned a saw 
and grist mill in Barre, and manufactured 
shingles quite extensively. He was also one 
of the owners of the cotton factories in Peters- 
ham and Smithville, and for many years 
figured prominently in the business enterprises 
of this locality. Succeeding to the homestead 
farm, he cultivated it until his death, which 
occurred January 21, 1840, while serving his 
second term in the legislature. He was a 
Selectman and an Assessor of the town. In 
politics he was a Democrat and in religious be- 
lief a Unitarian. Elizabeth Wadsworth Lor- 
ing, his wife, whom he married May 12, 18 14, 
was born in Grafton, Mass., March 2, 1790. 
She became the mother of six children, 
namely: Joseph F., born May 10, 181 5, who 
resides in Dorchester, Mass. ; Caroline M. , 
born September 11, 1818, who died May 5, 
1891; Nelson, the subject of this sketch; 
David, bom December 19, 1822, who died in 
January, 1895; Willard, born September 11, 
1826, who resides in San Diego, Cal. ; and 
Eliza Ann, born August 15, 1828, who died 
September 17, 1897. The mother died on 
June 2, 1872. 

Educated in the public schools of his native 
town, and reared to farming, Nelson Loring, 



142 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



with the exception of some six years spent in 
New York City and State, has spent his 
mature years in farming. He has carried on 
the home farm since 1848. The property con- 
tains two hundred and thirty-five acres of land. 
While his time is chiefly given to dairying, for 
which he keeps from twenty-five to thirty head 
of cattle, mostly Ayrshire stock, he raises ex- 
cellent crops of the staple products. Keeping 
up with the times in the way of improvement, 
he has remodelled his residence, which is one 
of the oldest in town; and his farm takes high 
rank among the most valuable estates in this 
section. 

On March 26, 1S50, Mr. Loring was joined 
in marriage with Maria A. Spooner. Born in 
Petersham, Mass., February 24, 1825, she was 
a daughter of Lucius and Nancy (Curtis) 
Spooner, the former of whom died June 16, 
1873, aged eighty-one, and the latter on Octo- 
ber 3, 1867, aged seventy-five years. Mrs. 
Loring gave birth to eight children, namely: 
Charles W. Loring, on November 16, 1852, 
who is married and lives in Utah; Henry, 
September 15, 1855, who resided in Colorado, 
and died in 1896; Joseph VV. , March 6, 1857, 
who died September 18, 1895; Adella, August 
14, 1858, who is the wife of Albert Bradley, 
of Barre; Lilla, June 25, i860, who is unmar- 
ried and resides at home; Frank E., June 22, 
1862, who is married and lives in Vermont; 
Clarence, June 14, 1864, who is also a resi- 
dent of Utah; and Jennie H. Loring, October 
17, 1866, who died November 24, 1891. The 
mother died September 9, 1896. In politics 
a Republican, Mr. Loring was a Selectman for 
about twelve years and a member of the Board 
of Assessors for some time. He attends the 
Unitarian church. In Barre he is regarded as 
one of its successful farmers. 



/STc 



EORGE H. THOMPSON, a leading 
V '3 1 farmer of New Braintree, son of 
^— *- Charles B. and Elizabeth D. (Fagan) 
Thompson, was born on the farm he now occu- 
pies, May 22, 1863. His first ancestor in this 
country, James Thompson, who came with his 
parents from Ireland or Scotland when eight 
years of age, and settled on the site of the 



present town of Holden; Mass., was one of the 
earliest settlers of New Braintree. James 
came to New Braintree on March 30, 1749, 
and died in June, 1790. He was Captain of 
•the first militia company ever organized in 
this town. His wife died in 1776. Nathan 
Thompson, son of James and great-grand- 
father of George H., born in New Braintree in 
1741, died here on March 12, 1814. He was 
a farmer, and for nineteen years he served the 
community as Town Treasurer. The first of 
his three marriages was contracted with Mary 
Hawes, who died in 1790. The maiden name 
of his second wife was Joanna Nichols; and 
that of his third wife, the great-grandmother 
of the subject of this sketch, was Mary, or 
Polly, Doty. Mary, or Polly, Doty Thomp- 
son, born in Hardwick on July 10, 1769, who 
was married on October 5, 1793, died on Oc- 
tober 1, 1854. 

Moses Thompson, son of Nathan and grand- 
father of George H., and the first of the fam- 
ily to settle on the estate now known as the 
Thompson farm, which for four generations 
previously had been known as the Woods 
farm, bought the place in 1834. Here he 
passed the remainder of his life, engaged in 
general farming; and here he died on May 26, 
1891, at the age of eighty-two. Born in New 
Braintree, November 21, 1808, he became 
known as one of the most progressive farmers 
in this section. For nineteen years he filled 
the double office of Assessor of Taxes and 
Town Treasurer. In religious faith he was a 
Congregationalist, and in politics he was 
successively a Whig and a Republican. Plis 
wife, whose maiden name was Hannah Bush, 
born in North Brookfield on December 4, 
181 1, died in New Braintree on August 26, 
1 891. She became the mother of three chil- 
dren, all still living, namely: Charles B., 
born September 20, 1834; Nathan, born Au- 
gust 26, 1837; an d Harriet D., born Novem- 
ber 6, 1 84 1. Nathan, who is a clergyman of 
the Congregational denomination, resides in 
Cheltenham, Md. , where he is the superin- 
tendent of the Reformatory for Colored Boys. 
Harriet is the widow of L. K. Harlow, late of 
Boulder, Col. 

Charles B. Thompson, who was born on the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



J 43 



farm, lived here until 1892, and, like his an- 
cestors, carried on general farming. He now 
owns a farm of forty-six acres in Hardwick, 
near Gilbertville village, which he purchased 
when he left New Braintree. Having been 
one of the leading agriculturalists in this 
town, his removal was much regretted by his 
old neighbors and friends. In politics he is a 
Republican. He served in a number of town 
offices while here, including that of Town 
Treasurer for several years. In religion he is 
a Congregationalist. His education was re- 
ceived in the public schools and at New Salem 
Academy. On January 23, 1858, he married 
Elizabeth, daughter of William and Jane M. 
Fagan. Mr. Fagan, who died in October, 
1877, was a farmer by occupation. His 
widow now resides in Maple City, Mich. 
They were the parents of nine children, all of 
whom but one are living. Mrs. Elizabeth 
Thompson, who was born in New Braintree, 
February 6, 1837, has had seven children, of 
whom three are deceased. The survivors are: 
George H., now of New Braintree; Francis 
H., born May 22, 1867; Ethel G., born Sep- 
tember 22, 1878; and Gertrude E., born Feb- 
ruary 14, 1884. Anna M. died at the age of 
eleven years, Harry W. at the age of three 
years and five months, and Charles M. at the 
age of nineteen months. 

George H. Thompson grew to manhood in 
his native town, obtaining his education in the 
public schools and the academies in the vicin- 
ity. He now owns the old homestead, whose 
original one hundred and fifty acres he has in- 
creased to three hundred. While he does 
more or less general farming, cutting annually 
about a hundred tons of hay, he makes a spe- 
cialty of dairying, and has a fine herd of about 
sixty cows. On December 10, 1887, he 
was married to Adelaide Wight, who, born in 
Dover, Mass., June 28, 1863, is a daughter of 
Frederick H. and Susan E. (Ware) Wight. 
Mr. Wight, a market-gardener, resides in 
Dover, of which place he is a native. His 
wife is a native of Wrentham, Mass. Mrs. 
Thompson is a member of the Congregational 
church. Her children are: Georgia E., Grace 
W., Charles B., Ruth W., and Anna F. In 
politics Mr. Thompson is a Republican. He 



is a member of P. of H., No. 170, at New 
Braintree. As an agriculturist he takes a 
leading rank in this section of the State, and 
as a citizen he commands the full confidence 
and respect of his fellow-townsmen. 



ZT^HARLES NELSON DOANE, Town 
I KtS Treasurer of Dana, Worcester County, 
^^ls>^ Mass., was born in Greenwich, 
Hampshire County, March 19, 
1830, son of Isaac and Mary (Stone) Doane. 
His paternal grandfather was Uriah Doane, 
who came from Cape Cod to Dana Centre, 
where he followed farming for the rest of his 
life. 

Isaac Doane, son of Uriah, was born in 
Dana, June 29, 1798. In early life he was a 
seafaring man. Later he resided in Green- 
wich, and about the year 1830 settled upon a 
farm located in the southern part of Dana, 
where he tilled the soil industriously as long 
as his health would permit. He died Decem- 
ber 27, 1877, lacking about six months of 
being eighty years old. In politics he was in 
his later years a Republican, having previ- 
ously supported the Whig party; and he served 
as a Selectman and an Assessor. In his re- 
ligious belief he was a Methodist. Mary 
Stone Doane, his wife, was born in Dana, 
March 29, 1809, daughter of Nathan and 
Mary Stone, both of whom were natives of 
this town. Her paternal grandparents lived 
on what was called "Granny Stone" Hill. 
Her father died November 26, 1858, aged 
eighty-three; and her mother died January 16, 
1864, aged eighty-five. Isaac and Mary S. 
Doane became the parents of six children, 
namely: Charles N., the subject of this 
sketch; Albert H., who was born September 
29, 1836, and died September 14, 1838; Syl- 
vanus H., born May 8, 1840, died De- 
cember 24, 1862, while serving his country 
in the Civil War; Lucinda V., born October 
2, 1842, died August 27, 1848; Alfred W., 
born December 4, 1844, wn0 resides in Dana 
Centre; and Franklin S., who was born No- 
vember 4, 1847, and died August 20, 1848. 
The mother died April 7, 1S90. 

Alfred W. Doane, only surviving brother 



'44 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of the subject of this sketch, was educated in 
the district schools and at the New Salem 
Academy, pursuing a twelve weeks' course at 
the latter institution, and paying his tuition 
with money saved from his earnings. He was 
for some time engaged in the butchering busi- 
ness. He finally bought the T. S. Johnson 
farm of one hundred and sixty-five acres at 
Dana Centre, and for the past twenty years 
has been engaged in farming and lumbering. 
He is at the present time the leading lumber- 
man of this locality, and has been successful 
in business. He has served as a Selectman, 
Assessor, and in other town offices. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican. On November 24, 
1870, he married Susie M. Johnson, who was 
born in Dana, September 7, 1850, daughter of 
Joel and Abigail (Richardson) Johnson. Her 
father was a merchant and hotel-keeper. He 
died January 25, 1892, aged seventy-six years, 
five months, and twenty-five days. Her 
mother, who was born December 8, 18 15, was 
a representative of the well-known Richard- 
son family of this town. Mr. and Mrs. Al- 
fred W. Doane have one daughter, Mabel F. , 
who was born August 30, 1876. The family 
attend the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Charles Nelson Doane acquired his educa- 
tion in the school located in District No. 1. 
He remained at home until twenty years old, 
assisting his father upon the farm, and about 
the year 1852 began work in the pianoforte 
leg factory, then carried on by Stimpson & 
Doane, with whom he remained some four 
years. In 1856 he established himself in the 
manufacture of piano cases and billiard tables 
at North Dana; and, after the burning of his 
factory in the latter part of that year, he re- 
moved to Orange, Mass., where he engaged in 
the same business. Selling out his interest 
in this enterprise some six months later, he 
was for the succeeding seven years engaged in 
teaming at North Dana. Then, starting in 
the butchering business here, he carried on a 
market from 1856 to April, 1895, when he re- 
tired in favor of his son. He is the owner of 
a valuable farm, and devotes his time to its 
cultivation. 

On August 2, 1854, Mr. Doane was joined 
in marriage with Frances E. Blackmer, who 



was born in Stockbridge, Mass., in June, 1S36. 
Of this union there is one son, Alfred E. 
Doane, who was born November 6, i860. 

Politically, Mr. Doane is a Republican. 
He has served with ability as chairman of the 
Boards of Selectmen and Assessors for a num- 
ber of terms, has held other town offices, and 
has been Town Treasurer for the past seven 
years. 

Alfred E. Doane is an enterprising and 
alert young business man. He is actively in- 
terested in local public affairs, having been a 
Selectman for the past seven years, and unani- 
mously elected chairman of the board in 1896. 
He has served as Assessor, Overseer of the 
Poor, and as a member of the School Board. 
He is prominently identified with the Repub- 
lican party here, and is a member of the Town 
Committee. On February 2, 1886, he mar- 
ried Hattie M. Sprague, who was born in 
Westfield, Mass., December 25, 1864. She 
is the mother of one daughter, Helen F. 
Doane, who was born December 5, 1897. 



M 



ARWIN R. BOYNTON, a well- 
known resident of Paxton, Mass., 
9/ for the greater part of his life, is a 
native of Grafton, Vt. His earli- 
est ancestors in this country were English. 
Born March 4, 181 8, he is a son of David and 
Lucy (Johnson) Boynton. David Boynton, 
son of Ebenezer, a former resident of Paxton, 
was also born in the town ; and he spent here 
the most of his life, engaged in farming. His 
wife, Lucy, was born in Worcester. 

A very young child when he was brought to 
Paxton by his parents, Darwin R. Boynton 
was educated in the Paxton schools; and all 
the associations of his childhood cluster around 
the place. At the age of seventeen he began 
learning the trade of boat-builder, and he 
worked at it subsequently for a number of 
years. Then he engaged in painting, and in 
time became a contractor. For thirty years 
he pursued this business most successfully, 
doing much work for people in Paxton and the 
adjoining towns. 

For many years Mr. Boynton has served his 
fellow-townsmen as Constable. In discharg- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



i47 



ing the duties of this office he has shown him- 
self both able and faithful. He is an active 
worker in the Congregational church, of which 
he has been a member since 1844, and which 
he has served for some years on its Executive 
Committee. The present Mrs. Boynton, for- 
merly Mrs. Marianna Holmes, whom he mar- 
ried on New Year's Day, 1894, is a daughter 
of Joseph H. Penniman, of Paxton. She is 
also a member of the Congregational church. 



JREN/EUS H. LOW was a well-known 
and highly respected resident of North- 
bridge. Born in Steuben County, New 
York, he was a son of Thomas and Susan 
(Decker) Low. One of his ancestors, Thomas 
Doughty, was a physician of note in the early 
days of New York. Although Dr. Doughty 
had lost a leg and was obliged to stump around 
on a wooden substitute, he succeeded in taking 
care of a large number of patients, and lived 
to the advanced age of ninety years. Mr. 
Low's paternal grandfather was the superin- 
tendent of cotton-mills in Matteawan, N.Y., 
for many years. His maternal grandfather, 
David Decker, was a soldier in the war of the 
Revolution. Thomas Low, a machinist by 
trade, went to Whitinsville at the age of forty 
years, and was subsequently a foreman in the 
machine works until 1895, a period of twenty- 
nine years. He died in 1896. 

Irenasus H. Low learned the machinist's 
trade in Holyoke, Mass. He was employed 
by the Remington Arms Company in Ilion, 
N. Y., during the Civil War, and later at 
Chicopee, Mass., by the Ames Plough Com- 
pany. Following that he worked at his trade 
in Syracuse, N. Y. In 1866 he went to Whit-" 
insville as master mechanic, having charge of 
the cylinder work in the Whitin machine shop. 
The ability with which he filled this position 
is well attested by the fact that he held it for 
a period of thirty-one years. For a long time 
he was an active member of the Republican 
party. His first Presidential vote was cast for 
Horace Greeley. He represented this district 
in the legislature in 1894, and served in the 
Committee on Printing, which in that year 
issued the book entitled " Massachusetts in 



the Army and Navy." At the time of 
Speaker Reed's visit to Whitinsville, Mr. Low 
was the president of the Whitinsville Republi- 
can Club. A well-known Mason, he was Mas- 
ter of Granite Lodge twice and a member of 
St. Elmo Royal Arch Chapter and of Deka- 
mus Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star. For 
years he was an active member of the Congre- 
gational church and a liberal giver toward its 
many benevolent works. 

By his marriage with Jane A. Griffith, of 
Ilion, N.Y., Mr. Low became the father of 
two children. His son, Walter Irenaeus, who 
graduated from Yale University, class of 1890, 
and in 1897 received the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy, is a teacher of history in the Shef- 
field Scientific School of Yale. Having mar- 
ried Catherine Young Caskey, Walter has now 
one daughter, Catherine Caskey Low. His 
sister, Grace E., who graduated from Mount 
Holyoke College, is a teacher in the public 
high school of her native town. The father 
died at Whitinsville, May 7, 1898. 




1 1, 1 817. 



ILAS MANDERVILLE WHEEL- 
OCK, the treasurer of the Calumet 
Woollen Company at Uxbridge, 
was born in Uxbridge, November 
A son of Jerry and Sukey (Day) 
Wheelock, he belongs to the seventh genera- 
tion descended from the emigrant ancestor, 
Ralph Wheelock, who came from Shropshire, 
England, in 1637, and settled in Dedham, 
Mass. The paternal grandfather, Simeon 
Wheelock, who was an officer in the Revolu- 
tion, was born in Mendon in 1741. He was 
Town Clerk of Uxbridge from 1773 to 1777. 

Jerry Wheelock, son of Simeon, born in 
Uxbridge on September 19, 1784, was one of 
the pioneer builders and operators of woollen 
machinery here. He early learned the trade 
of "set workman " and later that of machinery 
builder. In 1810, when the woollen-mill was 
built in Uxbridge, he became a member of the 
firm with his father-in-law, Daniel Day. 
This connection he severed a few years later, 
and entered the employ of Artemus Dryden, 
Jr., of Holden, for whom he was afterward 
engaged in building woollen machinery for 



148 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



many years. He also superintended the set- 
ting up of machinery in new mills. In 1814 
he was in Falmouth when that town was bom- 
barded by the British warship "Nimrod." 
That same year, also, he became a member of 
the corporation known as the Rivulet Manu- 
facturing Company, with which he was subse- 
quently connected for four years. For the 
next sixteen years he was engaged in the 
manufacture and repair of woollen machinery. 
In 1834 he went into the manufacturing busi- 
ness with his sons, and was associated with 
them until his retirement in 1846. His death 
occurred on October 10, 1861. 

Having received his elementary education 
in the public schools, Silas M. Wheelock at- 
tended a private school taught by Mr. E. 
Porter Dyer and later by Mr. C. C. Jewett, 
who was subsequently the librarian of the 
Smithsonian Institute. When only nine 
years of age he commenced work in a 
woollen-mill. From that time to the present 
he has been connected with the woollen in- 
dustry as workman, department superintend- 
ent, or manager. He was also for some time 
in a commission house in Boston and in New 
York City. In 1846 the firm of C. A. & S. M. 
Wheelock was formed for the purpose of man- 
ufacturing satinets, linseys, and tweeds, which 
it did until 1855. Then, after considerably 
enlarging its factory and adding to its power, 
it began the manufacture of fancy cassimeres, 
discontinuing that of all other fabrics. The 
new departure proved successful, and at the 
present time cassimere is produced on a large 
scale. Mr. Wheelock has been the general 
manager and financier of the firm. In 1870 
he bought the property of the Harris Woollen 
Company at Putnam, Conn., comprising a fac- 
tory containing twelve sets of machinery, a 
water-power estimated at one-fourth of the 
Quinnebaug River at that point, and a num- 
ber of dwellings. This was soon taken in 
charge by a corporation formed under the 
laws of Connecticut, bearing the name of 
the Putnam Woollen Company. In 1880 the 
capital stock was increased, a second factory 
was bought, and new machinery and water 
privilege were added to the former purchase. 
Mr. Wheelock was chosen treasurer and busi- 



ness manager of the corporation, and he filled 
the dual office until 1887. Then, on account 
of other business, he resigned. In 1883 he 
purchased the Central Mill property in Ux- 
bridge, including a factory, machinery, power, 
and houses. The Calumet Woollen Com- 
pany, a corporation organized under the laws 
of Massachusetts, took this property, and, 
after making extensive repairs and additions, 
began the manufacture of fancy cassimeres, 
with Mr. Wheelock for treasurer and general 
manager. The property known as the Ux- 
bridge Woollen Factory, and which utilized 
the whole of the Blackstone River water- 
power, after it was purchased by Mr. Wheel- 
ock in 1886, became the property of the Calu- 
met Woollen Company, and is now known as 
the Hecla Mill. Mr. Wheelock has now 
charge of the Calumet and Hecla Mills, and 
is the owner of the Wacautuck Mills, in 
which are made the goods of C. A. & S. M. 
Wheelock. From 1867 to 1870 he was inter- 
ested in a woollen factory at Wilsonville, 
Conn., which was operated under the firm 
name of S. M. Wheelock & Co. 

Mr. Wheelock has served his town for sev- 
eral years as Selectman and on various town 
committees. In 1S88 and 1889 he repre- 
sented the Second Worcester District in the 
State Senate, where during both years he 
was a member of the Committees on Manu- 
facturing and Parishes and Societies. Politi- 
cally, he is a Republican. Formerly a Whig, 
he voted for both William Henry Harrison 
and Henry Clay. He is a member of the so- 
ciety of the First Congregational Church, and 
has always been a generous contributor toward 
church expenses. For thirty-seven years he 
has been a director of the Blackstone Bank, 
which was merged into the Blackstone National 
Bank. He is also a stockholder in the Elec- 
tric Light Company. Since 1852 he has 
been a member of Uxbridge Lodge, No. 120, 
I. O. O. F., having served in all the offices. 
In 1841 he was united in marriage with Irene, 
daughter of Luke and Nancy (Wood) Taft, of 
Uxbridge. She has been the mother of five 
children, of whom Arthur and Eugene A. are 
living. The others were: Ellen, who mar- 
ried E. B. Haywood, of Uxbridge, and died 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



149 



in 1871; Alice, who was the wife of H. R. 
Smith, of Leominster, and died in 1891; and 
Henry, a graduate of Worcester Polytechnic 
School and a mill superintendent, who mar- 
ried Jennie G. Taft, of Uxbridge, and died in 
1881. 



TjlJGENE A. WHEELOCK, son of Silas 
pi M. and brother of Arthur Wheelock, 
"^" '■' born in Uxbridge on Eebruary 15, 
1846, attended the public schools of this town 
until 1862. In 1863 and 1864 he was a pupil 
at Williston Seminary, Easthampton, Mass. 
On leaving the seminary he entered the office 
of C. A. & S. M. Wheelock. In July, 1867, 
he took charge of a woollen-mill in Thomp- 
son, Conn., where he remained until April, 
1870. Since that time he has been agent of 
the Putnam Woollen Mills at Putnam, Conn., 
and since 1886, when his father retired from 
the position, he has been the treasurer of the 
company. In politics he is a Republican. 
He has been a member of the School Board at 
Putnam for the past two years, and he is con- 
sidered a most efficient official in that capac- 
ity. At the present time he is the auditor of 
the First National Bank of Putnam. On June 
17, 1 868, he married Sarah S. Taft, a daugh- 
ter of Zadock Taft, of Uxbridge. Two sons 
and three daughters have been born to him, 
and are all living. His eldest son, Silas M. 
Wheelock, second, occupies the position of 
superintendent of one of the mills. 



(^>TRTHUR WHEELOCK, son of Silas 
/-L\ M., born in Uxbridge on March 26, 
yJ[A 1 85 1, was educated in the public 

— ' schools of his native town and at 
Wilbraham Academy. At the age of seven- 
teen he entered the office of C. A. & S. M. 
Wheelock as book-keeper and to assist in 
buying stock and in selling the goods. He 
continued in that position until 18S3, when, 
upon the incorporation of the Calumet Mills 
and the purchase of the Central Mill property, 
he was made a director and mill manager. 
Since the purchase of the Uxbridge Mill, in 
1883, he has been largely interested in their 
management, as -well as in that of the other 



mills of the corporation. He is also a direc- 
tor of the Blackstone National Bank, the pres- 
ident of the Uxbridge and Northbridge Elec- 
tric Company, and a life trustee of the 
Uxbridge Public Library. For three years 
he has been a Selectman of the town and a 
member of the School Board. Taking much 
interest in the welfare of the town, .he has 
been active in an attempt to introduce a 
larger and better water supply. In politics 
he is a Republican. He is a member and 
Past Grand of Uxbridge Lodge of Odd Fel- 
lows. For some twenty-five years he has been 
connected with the Unitarian church and an 
active worker in its varied benevolences. In 
1873 he was married to Emogene Atchinson, a 
daughter of Daniel Atchinson, of Wilbraham. 
His children are: Stanley H. and Annie A. 
The former, who was born in July, 1879, 1S 
now a Senior student at Phillips Exeter Acad- 
emy. Annie, who was born in 1886, is at- 
tending the public schools of Uxbridge. 




ARRISON MOORE, who was a suc- 
cessful farmer of Worcester, traced 
his descent to one of the early set- 
tlers of this section of Worcester 
County. His ancestors, whose name was orig- 
inally spelled Mowers, were much respected in 
the town; and Moore's Hill and Street were 
named in their honor. His paternal grand- 
father, John Moore, a farmer and miller, was 
accidentally drowned at his mill while in the 
prime of life, and left his widow with two sons 
— Willard and Joshua. Willard Moore, his 
father, was born in Worcester, and here re- 
ceived such training as was usually given to 
farmers' sons in his day. Willard subse- 
quently purchased land bordering on Salis- 
bury Street, where he carried on mixed hus- 
bandry. He married Mary Curtis, who bore 
him six sons and two daughters, of whom 
Harrison was the youngest child. 

Harrison Moore, born in the part of Worces- 
ter then called the Red Mill District, became 
a farmer from choice. When ready to estab- 
lish himself as a householder, he settled on 
the fifty-acre farm on Moore's Hill now occu- 
pied by Mrs. Naomi S. Moore. An enterpris- 



!5° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ing and skilful agriculturist, he was success- 
ful in his undertakings and made improvements 
of an excellent character on his homestead, 
greatly increasing its value. In politics he 
was a Republican. He served the community 
as special policeman and grand juryman. 

On May 21, 1846, Mr. Moore married 
Naomi Slade, who was born in Paxton, Mass. 
Her father, Samuel Slade, a lifelong and 
highly respected resident of Paxton, died there 
in August, 1865, aged seventy-one years. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Sarah 
Anthony, born in Swansea, Mass., died at her 
daughter's home in December, 1880, aged 
eighty-five years, and was buried in Paxton. 
They had three children, as follows : Sybil, 
who died at the age of sixteen years; Mercy, 
the widow of the late William Gray, and re- 
siding in Oread Place, Worcester, a bright and 
active woman of eighty-two years; and Naomi, 
now Mrs. Moore. The grandparents of Mrs. 
Moore, Henry and Naomi (Chase) Slade, were 
well-known members of the farming commu- 
nity of Paxton, where they died severally in 
1826 and 1827. They belonged to the Society 
of Friends, and at their death were laid to rest 
in the Friends' burial-ground in Leicester, 
Mass. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Moore had four children, 
namely : Sarah, now the widow of Lauriston 
Towne, who died in Enfield, Mass., in Octo- 
ber, 1889, aged forty-three years; Fanny C, 
who is the wife of Homer Stearns, of Holden, 
Mass., and has four children — Lillian, Ever- 
ett, Dwight, Edna; Edward H., now conduct- 
ing the home farm, who married Sybil Morse, 
and has two children — Harry Moore and 
Clara Josephine; and Myra A., who is the 
wife of John Allison, of Worcester, and has 
three children — William Harrison, Marion, 
Mildred. Mr. Moore died at his home on 
Moore's Hill, March 30, 1893. 



MORY S. HAYNES, Town Clerk of 
Bolton and a Civil War veteran, was 
born in this town, August 18, 1840, 
son of Samuel B. and Rebecca 
(Hosmer) Haynes. His grandfather, Samuel 
Haynes, who was a native of Sudbury, Mass., 




moved from that town to Bolton in 1798, and 
settled upon a farm located on the Clinton 
road, two miles from the village. He died at 
the age of fifty years. His wife, Rebecca 
Brown Haynes, a native of Framingham, 
reared two children. The grandparents were 
Congregational ists in religion. 

Samuel B. Haynes was born in Bolton, 
April 21, 1 8 1 3. Succeeding to the owner- 
ship of the homestead, he followed, besides 
farming, the business of a comb manufacturer 
during his active years. His death occurred 
in 1897, when he was eighty-four years old. 
He was actively concerned in local affairs for 
a number of years, serving as a Selectman and 
upon the Board of Assessors, and always man- 
ifesting a deep interest in the general welfare 
of the community. His wife, Rebecca, was 
born in Acton, daughter of Nathan Hosmer, a 
prosperous farmer of that town. She became 
the mother of two children, namely: Jane D. , 
who married Levi Wheeler; and Amory S., 
the subject of this sketch. The mother lived 
to be seventy-nine years old. Both parents 
attended the Congregational church. Some 
of Mr. Haynes's maternal ancestors displayed 
patriotism as Americans in the war for inde- 
pendence, Abner Hosmer, his maternal great- 
uncle, losing his life in the Concord fight, at 
which his great-grandfather Brown, of Fram- 
ingham, was present. 

Amory S. Haynes passed his boyhood and 
youth in attending school and assisting his 
father upon the farm. He resided at home 
until September 16, 1862, when he enlisted as 
a private in Company I, Fifth Regiment of 
Massachusetts Volunteers, for nine months' 
service, and was discharged as Corporal after 
having participated in several battles. July 
19, 1864, he re-enlisted in the same company 
and regiment, with which he performed garri- 
son duty in the forts about the Capitol for one 
hundred days, being discharged as Sergeant. 
Upon his return he settled upon his present 
farm of sixty acres in the village of Bolton, 
and has since followed general farming with 
success. He has served upon the Republi- 
can Town Committee for twenty-five years, 
was Assessor three years, has acted as a Jus- 
tice of the Peace twenty-one years, and has 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'5 1 



attended to the duties of Town Clerk since 
1885, in all of which offices he has labored 
faithfully for the best interests of the com- 
munity. 

In 1864 Mr. Haynes was joined in marriage 
with Mary Wallace, who was born in Mary- 
land, only daughter of John S. Wallace. He 
has four children; namely, Elizabeth R., 
Samuel B., Susan R., and Mary W. Samuel 
B. is engaged in the envelope business; Susan 
R. is a book-keeper at the Medfield Asylum; 
and Mary W. is a stenographer and typewriter 
in Boston. All of them received a high- 
school education. Mr. Haynes belongs to the 
Patrons of Husbandry, is a member of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Farmers' Club, and 
was for a number of years Adjutant of Post 
Warren, No. 172, G. A. R. He attends the 
Unitarian church. 




)EWIS HAYDEN, proprietor of a flour- 
ishing fire insurance agency in Mil- 
ford, was born in Saxonville, 
Mass., March 15, 1849, son of 
Luther and Elizabeth R. (Rand) Hayden. 
His father, who was born in Groton, Mass., in 
1812, was a boot-treer, but relinquished that 
occupation to become a watchman in a straw 
factory. He is now living in retirement in 
Milford, where he has resided since 1852. 
He married Elizabeth R. Rand, a native of 
Maine; and Lewis, the subject of this sketch, 
is the only child of their union. 

Lewis Hayden began his education in Mil- 
ford, later attending school in Hopedale; and 
his studies were completed with a business 
course at French's Commercial College, Bos- 
ton. At the age of sixteen he began work in 
the straw factory of B. H. Spaulding, with 
whom he remained about two years. For the 
succeeding three years he was employed at 
Colburn, Fuller & Co. 's shoe factory. In 
1872 he found employment in the fire insur- 
ance and real estate office of the late George 
G. Parker, with whom he remained for a 
period of twenty years. On the death of Mr. 
Parker, which occurred in April, 1892, he suc- 
ceeded to the business, which he has since 
conducted alone. He is the local representa- 



tive of some of the most reliable companies, 
and most of the fire policies now in force in 
this locality have been written by him. He 
also acts as trustee, agent, and administrator 
of estates. 

Mr. Hayden has served as Town Clerk five 
years, Town Treasurer two years, Assessor 
three years, declining a renomination, and 
was a member of the Board of Selectmen for 
the year 1897. He is a Master Mason, and 
belongs to Montgomery Lodge, F. & A. M. 



OHN T. COMBS, a prominent agri- 
culturist of Warren, was born May 1, 
1836. His birthplace, the farm he 
now occupies and which was practically 
the lifelong home of his father, the late Levi 
Combs, has been in possession of the Combs 
family for several generations. The original 
owner was Dougal Combs, the first of the 
name to settle in this section of the county. 
John Combs, Sr., son of Dougal, was here en- 
gaged in tilling the soil during his active 
period. 

John Combs, Jr., the paternal grandfather 
of John T., having succeeded to the farm, 
added many improvements to the property. 
He was a soldier in the Revolutionary army, 
and for his services during that war drew a 
pension in his declining years. Levi Combs, 
the next proprietor of the ancestral acres, 
spent his period of possession successfully en- 
gaged in their cultivation. His death oc- 
curred August 23, 1848. Much interested in 
the welfare of the town, he was one of its Se- 
lectmen for a time. He married Cynthia 
Burroughs, of Warren. Their children were: 
George H. and John T. George, who was a 
prominent school teacher in New York City 
for more than twenty years, died at his 
brother's home on December 13, 1S79. 

John T. Combs acquired a practical com- 
mon-school education. Since early manhood 
he has had charge of the homestead. Under 
his management the land, covering one hun- 
dred and fifty acres, yields bountiful crops. 
He carries on the various branches of general 
agriculture, including dairying to some extent. 
The place is in an excellent condition, bearing 



r S 2 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



manifest evidence of the skill and industry of 
its proprietor. A stanch Republican in poli- 
tics and a man of much public spirit, he has 
served as Assessor and as a member of the 
town School Committee for several years. 
He is a Mason, having joined the Ouaboag 
Lodge, F. & A. M., of Warren, some years 
ago. 

On October 13, 1858, Mr. Combs married 
Miss Mary A., daughter of Charles and Mary 
(Sibley) Cummings, of Grafton, Mass. Mr. 
Cummings and his wife were respectively na- 
tives of Douglas and Sutton, Mass. Mrs. 
Cummings was a grand -daughter of Gideon 
Sibley, one of the soldiers of the Revolution- 
ary War. Of the children she and her hus- 
band reared, two are living, namely: Mary A., 
now Mrs. Combs; and Frank Cummings, of 
Southbridge, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Combs 
have one child, Charles L. Combs, who lives 
with his parents. 




VOUIS LEMAITRE AUGER, M.D., 
a skilful physician and surgeon of 
Worcester, was born in Louiseville, 
Canada, April 23, 1859. His 
great-grandfather emigrated from France. 
His grandfather, Desire Lemaitre Auger, who 
was the first merchant in Louiseville, and who 
acquired wealth and influence in that locality, 
left three sons, one of whom succeeded him 
in business. Charles Lemaitre Auger, M.D. , 
another son of Desire and the father of the 
subject of this sketch, was born in Louise- 
ville in 1 83 1. He took his medical degree 
at the Victoria University, and is still prac- 
tising his profession in his native town. 

Louis Lemaitre Auger attended Nicolet 
College, and pursued the study of medicine at 
Victoria University, from which he was grad- 
uated one year previous to that of his major- 
ity. Entering upon the practice of his pro- 
fession at Great Falls, N. H., in 1880, he 
resided there for nine years, being for three 
years of that period the town physician. In 
1889 he went abroad for further study, visit- 
ing London, Berlin, and Paris. While in the 
last-named city he was for some time the first 
assistant to Dr. Doleris. Upon his return to 



America in 1892 he conducted a private hos- 
pital in Montreal for a short time. In 
March, 1893, he came to Worcester, where he 
has since been located. He has acquired a 
large practice among the American as well as 
the French-Canadian population as the result 
of his professional ability. His specialties 
are gynaecology and diseases of the throat, 
nose, and ear, in which he is unusually suc- 
cessful. 

In 1884, at Joliette, Canada, Dr. Auger was 
united in marriage with Albina, only daugh- 
ter of Adolph Magnan, a man of political 
prominence in that section. Mrs. Auger was 
educated in a convent in her native town. 

The Doctor is a member of the Obstetrical 
and Gynaecological Society of Paris, of the 
Medical and Surgical Society of Montreal, of 
the Massachusetts Medical Society, the 
Worcester Medical Society, and other similar 
organizations. In 1888 he was first vice- 
president of a convention of French-Canadians 
held at Nashua, N.H., the largest assembly of 
the kind ever called together in the United 
States. He had previously been appointed a 
delegate to go to Washington for the purpose 
of inviting President Cleveland to attend. 
At a similar gathering held in Manchester, 
N.H., in 1889, he was the unanimous choice 
for president. His office and pharmacy are 
located at the corner of Park and Orange 
Streets, and he employs a registered pharma- 
cist to dispense medicine. 




ENJAMIN P. AIKEN, of West 
Brookfield, a well-known provision 
-J J dealer and agriculturist, son of Ben- 
jamin Aiken, was born February 24, 
1826, in Prescott, Hampshire County. The 
father, having spent his youth in Hardwick, 
Vt., the town of his birth, after attaining his 
majority, located on a farm in Prescott, Mass., 
where he was employed in cultivating the soil 
until his death, in 1837. His wife, Lucinda 
Paul, born in Massachusetts, was a daughter 
of a Revolutionary soldier. 

Benjamin P. Aiken was but eleven years 
old when his father died. He subsequently 
continued his studies at the district school for 




LOUIS L. AUGER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



*55 



a short time, after which he attended the 
academy in New Salem for a few terms. As 
soon as he was old enough he was obliged to 
assume the management of the homestead, on 
which his widowed mother had continued her 
residence. Although he conducted the farm 
very well, he desired to enter business. In 
1856 he removed to West Brookfield, where he 
at once established himself as a dealer in 
meat of all kinds. A few years later he 
formed a partnership with F. H. Barnes in 
the firm of Barnes & Aiken, which for twenty 
years or more carried on an extensive and 
lucrative business in Brookfield. Since re- 
turning to West Brookfield he has been en- 
gaged in the retail meat trade, dealt largely 
in cattle, and been actively occupied in farm- 
ing. In politics Mr. Aiken is closely identi- 
fied with the Democratic party. He is a 
member of the West Brookfield Farmers' 
Club. A man of sterling integrity and sound 
judgment in public matters, he has filled im- 
portant official positions. He was chairman 
of the local Board of Selectmen for several 
years, Town Assessor for a number of terms, 
and for twelve years he was a member of the 
School Committee. He is also a member of 
the Congregational society. On November 
20, 1855, he was married to Frances S. 
Owen, who was born and bred in Belchertown, 
Mass. His only child, Fannie O., is the 
wife of Charles H. Allen, of this town, and 
the mother of two children — Benjamin P. 
Allen and Ralph O. Allen. 




SCAR L. MATHEWSON, a meat 
and provision dealer of Millbury, son 
of Sterry Mathewson, was born May 
13, 1837, at Burrillville, R.I. The 
father, a well-known contractor and builder in 
Rhode Island, erected many residences and 
business houses in the vicinity of Woon- 
socket, where he spent much of his time prior 
to his death. The latter event occurred in 
middle life. He married Eliza Steere, who 
survives him, and is now a bright and active 
woman, although the frosts of eighty or more 
winters have whitened her hairs. She has 
had five children, four of whom reached ma- 



turity. Of the latter, Oscar L. and Edgar 
A., of Rhode Island, are living. 

After receiving an education designed to fit 
him for office work, Oscar L. Mathewson was 
employed as a book-keeper until his health, 
injured by the close confinement of his occu- 
pation, forced him to seek a less objectionable 
employment. Soon after the breaking out of 
the Civil War he came to Millbury to accept 
a position as book-keeper in the mill of Jason 
Emerson. He subsequently enlisted in the 
Second Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, and 
was detailed as book-keeper for General Janney. 
While in Newbern, N.C., he was given a fur- 
lough; and while at home he was detailed as 
clerk at the hospital in Readville, Norfolk 
County. Since the war he has resided on a 
small farm near the village of Millbury, and 
has carried on a successful business as a meat 
dealer. 

On July 24, 1859, Mr. Mathewson married 
H. Sophia Newton, who was born in Mill- 
bury, daughter of Elmer M. and Salome B. 
(Forbush) Newton, both of whom were natives 
of Westboro, Mass. Mr. Newton, a son of 
Barnabas Newton, of Westboro, was a man of 
intellectual attainments and for several years 
a teacher and book-keeper at Round Hill, 
Northampton, Mass. He subsequently set- 
tled in Millbury, where he died of quick con- 
sumption when but thirty-six years old. His 
wife, who was born in 1804, having survived 
him many years, died in 1877, on the home- 
stead now occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Mathew- 
son, and on which she settled soon after the 
death of her husband. Of her two children, 
a son died in early life of consumption. The 
farm was formerly owned by M. H. Severy, 
Mrs. Mathewson's uncle by marriage, who was 
one of the first to erect a house in this part of 
the town. He was a farmer and also a meat 
dealer. Mrs. Mathewson was educated in the 
Millbury Academy, the high school at 
Worcester, and at a select school for young 
ladies in the old Salisbury mansion. Of the 
two children born to Mr. and Mrs. Mathew- 
son, one daughter, Flora E., a young girl of 
rare beauty of character, died at the age of 
seventeen years, after a sickness of two 
months. The other daughter, Lottie Belle, 



156 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



is the wife of George B. Brigham, of West- 
boro, Mass., and has three children, two sons 
and a daughter. 



"irXANIEL D. COLE, a prosperous 
1=] dairyman of Barre and a Civil War 
j}Sy veteran, was born in this town, 
August 12, 1840, son of Daniel and 
Louisa (Robinson) Cole. His paternal 
grandparents were Phineas and Elizabeth 
Cole. Phineas was an early settler in the 
western part of Barre, where he followed agri- 
culture and teaming for the rest of his active 
period. He reared a family of three sons and 
four daughters. 

Daniel Cole, son of Phineas, was born in 
Randolph, Vt., April 24, 1807. He owned a 
good farm in the immediate vicinity of his 
son's present residence, and he cultivated it 
successfully during his active years. He died 
April 11, 1 88 1 . In politics he was a Demo- 
crat. A Congregationalist in religion, he 
contributed liberally toward the support of 
the church. Louisa, his wife, whom he mar- 
ried April 17, 1834, was born September 17, 
1805. She had five children, namely: Cyrus 
P., born March 31, 1835, who died July 13, 
1886; Maria A., born November 27, 1S37, 
who died July 31, 1864; Daniel D., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Henry W., born June 21, 
1843, who is now a resident of California; 
and Louisa A. Cole, born May 21, 1845, wno 
died August 8, 1877. The mother died in 
October, 1892. 

Having acquired his elementary education 
in the district school, Daniel D. Cole com- 
pleted his studies at the Barre High School. 
He enlisted in September, 1861, for service 
in the Civil War, joining Company E, First 
Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Cavalry. 
Afterward he served in South Carolina and in 
Virginia with the Army of the Potomac, 
where he shared some severe fighting. In 
September, 1864, at the expiration of his 
term of enlistment, he was honorably dis- 
charged. He spent the succeeding year at 
home, caring for his health, which was con- 
siderably impaired by the hardships of army 
life. Then he learned the wheelwright's 



trade, and followed it for a year. He has 
since been engaged in farming. In 1868 he 
bought a part of his present place, containing 
ninety-six acres. To this he has added the 
greater portion of his father's farm, and now 
owns some two hundred and fifty acres of de- 
sirable land. Making a specialty of dairy 
farming, which he conducts on a large scale, 
keeping an" average of forty head of Holstein 
grade cows, he is one of the best known dairy- 
men in this part of the State. 

On April 15, 1867, Mr. Cole was joined in 
marriage with Hattie N. Sampson. Born in 
North Brookfield, Mass., January 15, 1844, 
she is a daughter of Joel and Rachel (Ayers) 
Sampson, who were natives, respectively, of 
West and North Brookfield. Mr. Sampson, 
who was an energetic farmer, died in North 
Brookfield, July 14, 1858, aged forty-eight; 
and his wife died August 7, 1891, aged 
eighty-five years. The children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Cole are: Edward D., born January 23, 
1868, who married Florence Harwood, and is 
engaged in farming in Barre; Ella T., born 
June 14, 1874, who is the wife of Everett 
White, of Worcester, Mass. Hattie Isabella, 
born May 5, 1883; and Bertha R., born No- 
vember 12, 1885. In politics Mr. Cole is a 
Republican. He is a comrade of Samuel 
Woods Post, G. A. R., of Barre, and he at- 
tends the Congregational church, of which 
Mrs. Cole is a member. 




ELVIN HARVEY WALKER, a 
prominent shoe manufacturer of 
Westboro and one of its foremost 
business men, was born in Barre, 
Mass., January 23, 1842, a son of Silas 
Walker, Jr. His great-grandfather, Hezekiah 
Walker, born at Maiden, Mass., in 1750, 
when quite young removed to Holden, Worces- 
ter County, and subsequently became a pros- 
perous farmer of that town. With his wife, 
he was a prime mover in establishing a Bap- 
tist church there, the first one in the county. 
Two of his brothers were soldiers in the Rev- 
olutionary War. His son, Silas Walker, Sr., 
was born in Holden, and later resided in 
West Boylston and Westboro, dying in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



*57 



latter place in December, 1872. He was a 
Deacon in the Baptist church in the several 
towns in which he successively resided. 

Silas Walker, Jr., was born in West Boyls- 
ton, Mass. After reaching maturity he re- 
moved to a farm at Barre, where he was en- 
gaged in tilling the soil for a number of years. 
In the spring of 1843 he came with his family 
to Westboro, where he resided for twenty-two 
years, removing in 1865 to Worcester. After 
living in Worcester four years, he removed in 
1869 to Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich., 
where he remained for the rest of his life, his 
death occurring in November, 1894. He mar- 
ried Louisa Everett, of Princeton, and by her 
had eight children, as follows: Theresa Jean- 
ette, who was born at West Boylston, Mass., 
January 29, 1837, and died July 15, 1838; 
Irving Everett, born at West Boylston, May 
1 1, 1839, wno died a prisoner of war at Flor- 
ence, S.C., in December, 1864; Melvin Har- 
vey, born at Barre, Mass., January 23, 1842, 
subject of this sketch; Erastus Everett, who 
was born at Westboro, January 28, 1845, and 
is now residing at Fitchburg, Mass.; Silas 
Herbert, who was born at Westboro, November 
30, 1848, and died in California in Septem- 
ber, 1890; Emma Louisa, who was born at 
Westboro, May 11, 1852, and is now Mrs. 
O. A. Rowland, of Hesperia, Mich. ; Emmons 
Augustus, who was born at Westboro, May 
11, 1852, and died in infancy; and Myron 
Hamilton, born in Westboro, January 17, 
1855, who is now living in Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 

Melvin H. Walker was naturally studious 
in his younger days, and might have taken 
advantage of the excellent educational oppor- 
tunities afforded him if it had not been for 
the breaking out of the Civil War. On April 
15, 1861, immediately after the firing upon 
Fort Sumter, he enlisted for three years in 
what afterward became Company K, Thir- 
teenth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, and 
was at once ordered to Maryland. He was at 
Harper's Ferry; and, besides many sharp 
skirmishes, he participated in the battles of 
Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, Spottsyl- 
vania, North Anna, Petersburg, and Gettys- 
burg. In the last-mentioned battle, which 



was one of the bloodiest of the war, and which 
at the same time marked the turn of events in 
favor of the North, he received a bullet 
wound, and, being captured by the enemy, 
was held a prisoner three days. He was then 
fortunate enough to regain his liberty, and 
after recovery, four months later, rejoined his 
regiment, which he found greatly reduced in 
numbers. At the expiration of his term of 
enlistment he was mustered out of service as 
Sergeant before Petersburg, and returned to 
his home in Westboro in August, 1864. 

During the succeeding four years he was 
engaged in the manufacture of shoes in com- 
pany with George B. Brigham, and was after- 
ward in the same business at Grand Rapids, 
Mich., until May, 1873. Returning then to 
Westboro, he became superintendent of 
George B. Brigham's factory, which position 
he held for five years. After the new firm 
of Brigham, Gould & Co., was formed, he 
remained superintendent until 1880, when he 
was admitted to membership in the firm, which 
in 1883 became known as Gould & Walker. 
This is its present style, notwithstanding that 
Mr. Gould died some years ago, and Mr. 
Walker has since taken into partnership Mr. 
M. V. Dunning, of Boston. This enterpris- 
ing firm is one of the most prosperous in 
town, and, with an average force of two hun- 
dred and fifty hands, is carrying on an exten- 
sive business. 

Mr. Walker has long been a strong temper- 
ance man, and for many years was active in 
the Prohibition party. He has since returned 
to the Republican ranks, though still retain- 
ing his temperance principles. He has served 
efficiently as a member of the School Board 
six years; has been resident trustee of the 
Lyman School since 1884, serving as presi- 
dent of the board for eight years ; and he is 
also vice-president and chairman of the Board 
of Trustees of the Westboro Savings Bank. 
He belongs to the Royal Arcanum and to the 
Westboro Post, G. A. R., of which he is Past 
Commander. He is also active in religious 
circles, having been Deacon of the Baptist 
church in Grand Rapids, Mich., and having 
since 1883 filled the same official position in 
the Baptist church of this town. He has 



i58 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



likewise served as superintendent of the 
Sunday-school. He has travelled extensively,' 
both in this country and abroad, having made 
numerous trips throughout the South and 
West, accompanied by his wife, with whom 
he made a tour through the British Isles some 
time ago, and more recently through Southern 
Europe and the Holy Land. 

Mr. Walker married May i, 1866, Miss 
Anamelia Moses, of Westboro, and they have 
six children, namely: Irving E. , a travelling 
salesman for the firm of Gould & Walker; 
Gertrude A., wife of Louis H. Bradley, of 
Hartford, Conn. ; Florence L., a student at 
Wellesley College; Raymond W., who is 
preparing for college in Providence, R.I. ; 
Mary E. , in the Dana Hall preparatory school 
at Wellesley; and Melvin H., Jr., a pupil in 
the Westboro schools. 



M 



AVID R. DEAN, a manufacturer of 
lumber in Oakham, son of Elijah 
and Mary M. (Goodale) Dean, was 
born in this town, July 27, 1832. 
Elijah Dean, Sr., his grandfather, who served 
in the army during his younger days, settled 
upon a farm in the southern part of Oakham, 
and resided here for the rest of his life. The 
maiden name of Grandmother Dean was Both- 
well. 

Elijah Dean, the father, who was born in 
Oakham, August 22, 1802, spent the active 
period of his life at farming in the south- 
western part of the town, and died March 2, 
1885. He served as a Selectman for a num- 
ber of years, and was a member of the Congre- 
gational church. His wife, Mary, who was 
born in Oakham, March 9, 18 12, became the 
mother of the following children: David R., 
the subject of this sketch; Mary L., born 
June 29, 1834, who died young; Caroline M., 
born June 18, 1836, who died October 29, 
1886; Eunice C, born June 12, 1838, who 
married William S. Crawford, and resides in 
Oakham; E. W. Dean, of North Brookfield; 
Mary A., born September 3, 1844, who died 
April 22, 1869; Emily K., born November 
19, 1847, who resides in this town; and John 
A. Dean, born January 31, 185 1, who resides 



in Worcester. The mother died February 21, 
1866. 

David R. Dean acquired his education in 
the town schools. Since he was a young man 
he has been engaged in the manufacture of 
long and short lumber a period of more than 
forty years. With the exception of Daniel 
M. Parker, he carries on the largest business 
in that industry in this locality. His saw- 
mill, which is driven by water-power, is 
equipped with modern machinery, and fur- 
nishes employment to several men for nearly 
the year around. He also manufactures cider 
on quite an extensive scale. Besides his 
well-kept homestead of thirty acres and other 
land, he owns a good farm in the western part 
of Oakham. 

On October 1, 1855, Mr. Dean married 
Sarah E. Reed, who was born in Oakham, 
daughter of Lewis H. Reed. Mrs. Dean is 
the mother of four children, namely: Addie 
M., born August 16, 1856, who is now the 
widow of the late J. F. Robinson, and resides 
in West Brookfield, Mass.; Walter R., born 
December 27, 1857, who married Nellie 
Tracy, and resides in Oakham; Mason S., 
born May 22, 1859, wn0 married Julia A. 
Nash, and lives in this town; and Martha I., 
born December 12, 1862, who married S. C. 
Cochran, and resides in Worcester. Mr. 
Dean has been a Selectman for eleven years 
and a member of the Board of Assessors, of 
which he is now the chairman, for the past 
twelve or fourteen years. In politics he is a 
Republican. 




EORGE M. STUART, a well-known 
[ farmer of Sterling, son of Charles F. 
and Sarah S. (Wright) Stuart, was 
born on November 9, 185 1, at the homestead 
where he now resides, situated about a mile 
and a quarter from the village, on the road 
from Fitchburg to Worcester. This property 
was purchased by his paternal grandfather, 
Samuel Stuart, in 1802. 

Samuel Stuart, who was Lieutenant in a 
cavalry regiment, was born on Rowley Hill, 
and was a lifelong resident of Sterling. He 
was by occupation a farmer and a chair-maker. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



r S9 



He died here at the age of fifty-three years. 
Charles F. Stuart was one of ten children, 
and was brought up on the farm now occupied 
by his son George. In the latter part of his 
life he removed to the farm adjoining, and 
there died at the age of seventy-nine. He 
was a highly esteemed citizen. Always fond 
of music, he early became a skilled performer 
on the bass-viol, and played for years in the 
church and for various entertainments and 
dances. He served the town as Highway 
Surveyor. His wife, Sarah, was the daughter 
of Elijah Wright, of Ashby, Mass., and was 
one of ten children. She died in 1894, at the 
age of seventy-nine. Mrs. Stuart was a mem- 
ber of the Congregational church, and her 
husband was a member of the Unitarian 
church. Of the three sons born to them, two 
— George M. and Joseph C. — are now living. 
The other son, who inherited musical talents 
and sang in the church choir for several years, 
died of apoplexy. 

George M. Stuart attended the common 
schools of the town until he was fifteen years 
of age, when he began to work out on a farm. 
Returning to the home of his boyhood at the 
end of a year, he stayed with his father and 
mother until he was nineteen. He then went 
into the tannery, and was employed there for 
six years. Subsequently he worked at carpen- 
tering, and resided for two years on a place 
he owned in Sterling village. Since then 
Mr. Stuart has lived on the old farm where he 
first saw the light of day, and has given his 
attention to agricultural pursuits. ■ About one 
hundred acres are devoted to his dairying in- 
terests. He has built a new barn, which is 
forty by sixty feet, and he keeps a dairy of 
twelve cows, selling milk in Boston. 

Mr. Stuart was married in 1895 to Lizzie J. 
Goss, who was born in Northfield, Vt., and is 
one of three children of Franklin Goss, a rail- 
road engineer. 

Mr. Stuart is a Republican in politics. He 
has been Constable for two years, and in 1893 
served the town as Overseer of the Poor. He 
has been a member of Sterling Grange for 
fourteen years, has been through all the chairs 
in that body, and is now Past Master. He is 
a member of the Farmers' Club, and has been 



its president for two years. A life member 
of the Worcester East Agricultural Society, 
he was one of its trustees for five years. Be- 
sides being connected with the above-men- 
tioned societies, Mr. Stuart has been a mem- 
ber of Lancaster Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, of Clinton, for twenty-three 
years, and has been through all the chairs. 
He is also a member of Clinton Encampment, 
of the Daughters of Rebecca, and of the 
American Order of United Workmen of 
Sterling. 

Mr. Stuart attends the Unitarian church. 
He has been the leader of the church choir 
for twenty-five years. At various periods he 
has been a member of a brass band. 



SIpE! 



ELMER GOULD, of West Brook- 
jl field, a well-known dealer in coal, 
grain, and flour, was born September 
4, 1847, in Holland, Hampden County, son of 
John B. Gould. His grandfather, Lyman 
Gould, was a lifelong resident of that town. 
The father spent the earlier years of his life 
in Holland, where he was numbered among 
the leading agriculturists of the place. Re- 
moving from there with his family to Warren, 
Mass., he purchased a large grist-mill, and 
from that time until his death, in 1892, car- 
ried on an extensive business as a dealer in 
grain and flour. A man of much force of 
character, intelligent, progressive, and pub- 
lic-spirited, he served as Assessor of the town 
while living in Holland; and in 1890 he rep- 
resented Warren in the General Court of Mas- 
sachusetts. He was a valued member of the 
Universalist church, and during his later days 
was identified with the Democratic party as 
one of its strongest adherents. Of his chil- 
dren by his marriage with Olive M. Moulton, 
of Wales, Mass., the survivors are: Jerome 
M., of Brookfield, Mass.; T. Elmer, the sub- 
ject of this biography; Mary L., the wife of 
Charles B. Blair, of Warren; Frank J., also 
of Warren; Carrie, the wife of William 
Blake, of Fitchburg, Mass.; and Cora M., of 
Warren, Mass. 

T Elmer Gould attended the public schools 
of Holland until he came to Warren with his 



i6o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



parents, being then a boy of thirteen years. 
He subsequently continued his studies in the 
Warren High School, which he left at the age 
of sixteen to begin an apprenticeship in the 
Knowles Steam Pump works in Warren. At 
the expiration of two years, the period of his 
apprenticeship, he remained in the works as a 
journeyman for the ensuing eleven years, dur- 
ing which time he became perfectly familiar 
with the trade of pump-making. In 1876 
Mr. Gould established himself in the grain 
and coal business at West Brookfield, as 
senior member of the firm Gould & Burbank, 
which existed ten years. Buying then the 
interest of his partner, he has since carried on 
the business alone with much success. Be- 
sides coal and grain, his stock now includes 
feed of all kinds, lime, cement, fertilizers, and 
other goods. On January 1, 1892, he bought 
his father's mill property in Warren, and now 
has full control of the business in both 
places. 

Mr. Gould is a trustee of the Warren Sav- 
ings Bank, of the Quaboag Building Associa- 
tion, and of the Olmstead Quaboag Corset 
Company at West Brookfield. In politics he 
affiliates with the Republican party, and he is 
an active member of the Universalist church 
at Warren. On September 4, 1871, he mar- 
ried Lizzie A., daughter of the late Lincoln 
Lathe, of Southbridge, Mass. They have one 
daughter, Rose M. Gould. 



7~\HARLES V. COREY, an esteemed 
I Ks resident of Sturbridge, where he has 
^^Hs conducted a general store for over 

thirty years, was born in this town, 
July 8, 1838, son of George Vernon and 
Martha M. (Griggs) Corey. His paternal 
grandparents were Jacob and Betsey (Walker) 
Corey. The former, who lived eighty-three 
years, was for fifty years engaged in medical 
practice here in Sturbridge, where travelling 
was then chiefly done on horseback. He also 
followed farming with success, and at his 
death owned a place containing one thousand 
acres. 

George Vernon Corey, born October 10, 
1800, learned the printer's trade in Spring- 



field. At the age of twenty-one, in company 
with Timothy Upham, also of Sturbridge, he 
started from New York, and walked the entire 
distance to Pittsburg, Pa. Here he and his 
companion took a flat boat, and sailed down 
the Ohio River to New Harmony, in the State 
of Indiana. Leaving Mr. L T pham there, he 
went on to New Orleans, where he secured 
work on a paper, the New Orleans Picayune, 
on which he was employed for nearly two 
years. During that period he had many ex- 
citing experiences. Then, having reached 
New York on a sailing-vessel, he came direct 
to Sturbridge. In Sturbridge he soon took up 
farming on the old homestead, and became one 
of the leading agriculturists of the town. In 
1844, while residing in Washington, D. C, he 
was correspondent for the Worcester Spy. 
He represented Sturbridge in the Massachu- 
setts General Court in or about the year J 850, 
and was its Town Clerk for a time. When 
he died, in April, 1887, he was in his eighty- 
seventh year. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Martha M. Griggs, a native of Brimfield, 
born in May, 18 13, died in September, 1893, 
in the eightieth year of her age. They had 
six children — G. Gordan, Gilbert M., Charles 
V., Lizzie M., Charlotte L. Foster, and 
Francis E. G. Gordan was born in 1831; 
Gilbert M., born in 1833, died in 1889; 
Lizzie M. was born September 9, 1841 ; Char- 
lotte L. Foster, in April, 1843; and Francis 
E. , in May, 1845. 

Charles V. Corey received his education in 
the Sturbridge public schools. At the age of 
eighteen he left home and went to Loda, 111., 
where he worked on a farm for a few years. 
Returning home at the end of that time, he 
assisted his father for a year. Then he went 
to Philadelphia, and clerked in a shoe store. 
In 1865 he returned from Philadelphia, and 
bought out the general store here in Stur- 
bridge, which he has since conducted. On 
February 28, 1868, he was married in the 
town of Upton to Maria A. Gibson, who was 
born in May, 1847, daughter of Benjamin and 
Hannah Gibson. Three children have blessed 
the union, namely: Helena M., born Decem- 
ber 6, 1870; Henry V., born December 7, 
1874; and Carl F. , born October 6, 1885. 




CAMERON CORBIN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



.63 



Mr. Corey is a Republican in politics. Ap- 
pointed Postmaster of Sturbridge in January, 
1868, under the administration of Ulysses S. 
Grant, he served in that capacity for twenty- 
eight years and seven months. He has also 
been Selectman of the town and a member of 
the School Committee for three years each, 
and he is the secretary and treasurer of the 
Worcester South Agricultural Society. Dur- 
ing the existence of the Quinebaug Library 
Association he was librarian, and he was in- 
fluential in obtaining for the town the presen- 
tation of four hundred volumes. In religious 
belief he is a Unitarian. 



T^tAMERO 
I \y perous 
\Js__^ Steut 



,AMERON CORBIN, formerly a pros- 
is farmer of Barre, was born in 
.iben County, New York, March 
17, 1 82 1. His parents, Stephen and 
Sarah Corbin, were natives of Vermont or New 
York. The father, who was a farmer, passed 
his last days in the Green Mountain State. 
Having been reared and educated in Vermont, 
Cameron Corbin came when a young man to 
Barre in 1841, and was engaged in farming 
until after his marriage. He then went to 
Boston, where he resided about two years, at 
the end of which time he returned, and, 
settling upon the farm owned by his wife's 
parents, managed the property during their 
declining years. After their death he contin- 
ued to carry on general farming for the rest of 
his life. He died August 17, 1892, aged over 
seventy-one years. He was a worthy, upright 
man, and he stood high in the estimation of 
the community. In politics he was a Repub- 
lican. 

On May 22, 1845, Mr. Corbin was joined in 
marriage with Phileura Adams, who survives 
him. Born in Barre, August 31, 1825, she is 
a daughter of James and Mary (Sibley) 
Adams, who were natives respectively of New 
Braintree and Sutton, this State. Her pater- 
nal grandfather, Luther Adams, was a compar- 
atively early settler in Barre. Her father in 
1812 bought the property she now owns. In 
1825 or 1826, after converting it into a good 
farm, he built the present brick house. In 
politics he acted with the Democratic party. 



At his death he was seventy-five years old, 
and his wife reached the age of seventy- 
two. They attended the Baptist church. Of 
their three daughters, Phileura is the only 
one living. The others were: Sarah Ade- 
laide, born October 11, 181 3, who married 
John D. Cooper; and Mary Sibley, born No- 
vember 22, 181 8, who became the wife of 
John W. Corbin. Mrs. Phileura Corbin has 
had one son, born December 20, 1858, who 
died December 26, 1862. Since the death 
of her husband she has successfully carried 
on the farm with the aid of hired assistants. 
In 1863 she united with the Congregational 
church, of which her late husband was a mem- 
ber for many years. 




IMON C. ABBOTT was a highly 
esteemed resident of Paxton. Born 
here, February 8, 1828, he was a 
son of Aaron and Betsy (Howe) 
Abbott and a grandson of Abijah Abbott, a 
former resident of Paxton. Both of his par- 
ents were born here. His father, who lived 
to be about fifty years of age, and was by oc- 
cupation a farmer, spent the greater part of 
his life in Paxton. The family is said to be 
of English origin. 

Shortly after the death of his father, being 
then a lad of five or six years, Simon went to 
live in the family of Homer Chase, where he 
remained for seven years. He then worked 
for several years in the employment of David 
G. Davis, who was a prominent farmer in 
Paxton. In his eighteenth year he removed 
to Worcester, and obtained work in a shoe fac- 
tory. Subsequently for some years he was 
engaged in treeing boots, both in Worcester 
and Paxton. Following this he turned his 
attention to farming and the lumber business. 
He settled permanently in Paxton in 1853, 
In August, 1864, he enlisted in Company F. 
First Battalion, Heavy Artillery, being in 
Captain Perry's command. Stationed at Fort 
Warren, Mass., he was on duty there until 
the close Of the war. He was honorably dis- 
charged on July 1, 1865. 

Mr. Abbott's marriage took place on Janu- 
ary 16, 185 1. His wife, whose maiden name 



164 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was Elizabeth C. Chapin, is a native of Ber- 
nardston, Mass. Her parents, Otis and Betsy 
(Stevens) Chapin, were born in Bernardston 
and Gill, Mass,, respectively. Of their chil- 
dren, three others are living, namely: Try- 
phena, who is the wife of Rodney Park, of 
Bernardston; Martha, now Mrs. Aldrich, a 
widow residing in Bernardston; and Albert, 
who is a resident of Montague, Mass. Mr. 
and Mrs. Abbott have been the parents of two 
children — Charles C. and Lizzie — both of 
whom are deceased. In politics Mr. Abbott 
was an Independent. True to his convictions 
in every matter, he commanded the respect of 
all who knew him. He died April 2, 1898. 




CARLOS DUDLEY, one of the 
farmers of Rutland, was born 
in Vermont State, at Chittenden, on 
October 2, 1842. His parents, Julius and 
Italy (Thompson) Dudley, were natives of 
Vermont. The father was a farmer by occupa- 
tion. Of his four children, Sidney and Jonas 
are deceased. His only daughter, Diantha, 
is now Mrs. Stoddard, of Emporia, Kan. 

Having received his education in the com- 
mon schools of Vermont, Era Carlos Dudley, 
then about sixteen years of age, came to Mas- 
sachusetts, and was there employed at farm 
work by the month until his marriage. He 
then bought a little place in Shrewsbury, con- 
taining an acre of land, and resided on it for 
the next three years. At the end of that 
period he purchased his present fine estate, 
the Dudley homestead, which is one of the 
most attractive and desirable properties in 
the vicinity. To its original purchase of one 
hundred and seventy-five acres he has added 
more land, until at the present time the estate 
comprises about three hundred and fifty acres, 
making it one of the largest farms in the 
town. Besides carrying on general farming, 
he does a large dairy business, keeping about 
forty head of cattle. 

On September 18, 1865, Mr. Dudley was 
married to Eleanor Stearns. A native of 
Holden, she is a daughter of Luther and Jane 
(Stott) Stearns, who are now the oldest mar- 
ried couple living in that place. Mr. Stearns 



was born in Holden, February 25, 181 8. His 
wife, a native of Manchester, England, was 
born May 6, 1824. They have been the par- 
ents of nine children, as follows: Ezra J., 
born June 24, 1842, who fought in the Civil 
War with Company C of the Thirty-fourth 
Massachusetts Regiment; Mrs. Hannah Bal- 
lou, born September 21, 1844; Mrs. Eleanor 
Dudley, born July 18, 1846; Mrs. Jane Stone, 
born August 19, 1848; Luther T., born April 
9, 1851; Henry E., born November 15, 1853; 
Alfred A., born October 12, 1855; Hattie L., 
born January 11, 1861 ; and Mrs. Lydia A. 
Myrick, born September 23, 1863. Luther, 
Harriet, and Lydia are now deceased. Mr. 
and Mrs. Dudley have had seven children, of 
whom Flora M. died at the age of eleven 
months, and Ida A. at the age of thirteen 
months. The living children are: Ira Gor- 
don, born in Shrewsbury, June 25, 1867; 
Leon S., born February 22, 1872; Dora I., 
born November 23, 1876; Cora O., born No- 
vember 8, 1878; and Enola A., born Novem- 
ber 21, 1884. Mrs. . Dudley is a member of 
the Church of Christ at Worcester, Mass. 
She has proved a valuable assistant to her hus- 
band in all the years of their married life. 
During the summer months her home is open 
to boarders, who find here a delightful spot in 
which to rest. The rooms are large and airy, 
the rates reasonable. About twenty-five 
guests are accommodated. There are ample 
facilities for boating and fishing, and the 
guests of the house have the use of carriages 
without extra charge. The farm is about a 
mile and a quarter distant from the railroad. 



§OSEPH M. OLNEY, a well-known 
business man of Southbridge and one 
of the survivors of the crew of the 
United States ship "Cumberland," 
that was sunk in Hampton Roads by the Con- 
federate ram "Merrimac" in 1862, was born 
in Ashford, Conn., July 8, 1844, son of 
Thomas H. and Mary (Marcy) Olney. The 
father, son of Jeremiah Olney, of Ashford, 
was born in Ashford in 1804. He followed 
the trade of a machinist, and died in South- 
bridge in 1858. His wife, who was a daugh- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



165 



ter of Stephen Marcy, of Hartford, Conn., be- 
came the mother of eight children, six of 
whom are living, namely: Nellie F., the wife 
of Thomas Sanders, of the Southbridge Print- 
ing Company; Abby, who married Albert 
Kinney, of Union, Conn. ; Martha, who mar- 
ried Benjamin Warren, and resides at Maple 
Hill, Kan. ; Susan, the wife of Henry Potter, 
of Putnam, Conn.; Marietta, now residing in 
Brooklyn, who is the widow of Barnard Os- 
born, late of Windsor, N.Y. ; and Joseph M., 
the subject of this sketch. 

Joseph M. Olney was educated in the com- 
mon and high schools of Southbridge. While 
still a youth he shipped as cabin boy on board 
the merchantman "H. M. Hayes," Captain 
Loring, bound for the East Indies, and during 
the voyage visited Bombay, Calcutta, and 
Hong-Kong. Upon his return he entered the 
United States navy as an apprentice boy, join- 
ing the "Cumberland." After the loss of 
the "Cumberland" and half its crew of three 
hundred and seventy men he received an 
honorable discharge. Subsequently he re-en- 
listed, and was ordered to the "Tioga," an 
armored yacht that had been built for Presi- 
dent Lincoln, which now entered the service 
with a roving commission to capture blockade 
runners and Confederate cruisers. After 
spending some time stationed near the mouth 
of the James River, the "Tioga" cruised for 
twenty months among the West Indies, capt- 
uring seventeen prizes. Then the appearance 
of yellow fever on board compelled her to re- 
turn North. The yacht was subsequently con- 
demned. Her crew was transferred to the 
"Octario," which afterward took part in the 
battles of Mobile Bay and Hatris Inlet, and 
was in the Alabama River when the news of 
Lee's surrender reached her. From there she 
went to New Orleans and thence to New 
York, where her crew were honorably dis- 
charged. Thereupon Mr. Olney returned to 
Southbridge, and entered the employ of the 
Hamilton Woollen Company as a machinist 
and cotton carder, remaining with them until 
1872. In company with, his brother he then 
bought the grocery business of Thomas Potter 
& Co., and conducted it under the firm name 
of M. K. Olney & Co. for a year. At the end 



of that time his brother retired, and the busi- 
ness was carried on by Olney & Cook. Mr. 
Olney finally sold his interest in the concern 
to E. C. Ellis, and, entering the hotel busi- 
ness, was for a number of years connected 
with the Dresser House as clerk and manager. 
Appointed Deputy Sheriff in 1890, he served 
in that capacity until 1894. Since then he 
has devoted his attention to the real estate 
business and public affairs. He is a stock- 
holder of the Water Supply, Electric Light, 
and Street Railway Companies, having been 
one of the promoters of the last-named enter- 
prise; and he is a director of the Southbridge, 
Sturbridge & Brookfield Railway Company 
and the secretary of the Board of Trade. 

In 1872 Mr. Olney was joined in marriage 
with Abbie Phipps Lyon, a daughter of Lib- 
erty A. and Abbie (Phipps) Lyon, of South- 
bridge. The two sons of this union are: 
William R., born in 1876; and Thomas L., 
born in 1888. William R. Olney, who is a 
graduate of the Southbridge High School and 
the Worcester Academy, completed his studies 
with a business course at Bryant & Stratton's 
Commercial College in Boston, and is now in- 
voice clerk for the Southbridge Printing Com- 
pany. Mr. Olney, Sr., was first chosen Se- 
lectman in 1891, since which time he has 
served either as clerk or chairman of the 
board. He has also been Tax Collector for 
the same length of time. A Mason of Ouin- 
nebaug Lodge, he belongs to Doric Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; Worcester Commandery, 
Knights Templar; and Aleppo Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine, Boston. The other beneficiary 
organizations of which he is a member in- 
clude Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Knights of Pythias. He attends the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



(W™ 



EORGE C. CHILD, a well-known 
V 5T resident of Oxford and a veteran of 
the Civil War, was born in Pomfret, 
Conn., January 27, 1833, son of Elisha and 
Lora (Davidson) Child. His great-grand- 
father came from Scotland ; and the grand- 
father, Charles Child, who was a prosperous 
farmer of Pomfret, served five years in the 



i66 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



American army during the Revolutionary 
War. Elisha Child, father of George, suc- 
ceeded to the ownership of the homestead, 
and his active years were spent in tilling the 
soil. 

George C. Child acquired his education in 
the district school, which he attended winters, 
the rest of his time being occupied in assist- 
ing his father upon the farm. When a young 
man he learned the carpenter's trade, at 
which, prior to the Civil War, he worked as a 
journeyman in Worcester. In 1862 he en- 
listed in the Twenty-first Regiment, Con- 
necticut Volunteers, and served in the ranks 
about one year, during which time he partici- 
pated in the battles of Fredericksburg and 
Suffolk. He was afterward detailed as a car- 
penter in the Quartermaster's department, 
where he remained for most of the time until 
the close of the war. He has a vivid recollec- 
tion of the broken-down condition of the army 
wagons and gun carriages surrendered by 
General Lee at Appomattox; and as that 
event took place near the corps headquarters, 
where he was at work, he stood but a short 
distance from General Grant during the cere- 
mony. After his discharge he resumed his 
trade, working in Webster, Mass., from which 
town he moved to Worcester, where he re- 
mained for some time. He then purchased a 
house in Oxford, which soon afterward (a few 
years ago) he exchanged for a small farm, in 
the cultivation of which he has since been 
engaged. 

Mr. Child married Eliza Congdon, daughter 
of Welcome A. Congdon, of Putnam, Conn. 
He has three children living, namely: Frank 
S., born in i860, who married Carrie Gates, 
of Shrewsbury, and resides in Worcester, hav- 
ing one daughter, Lora, born in 1891 ; Mary, 
born in 1862, who is the wife of Charles 
Marsh, of Oxford, and has one son, Westley 
Child Marsh, born in 1892; and George 
Child, born in 1868, who is unmarried, and 
resides in Worcester. Mr. Child had four 
other children, all of whom died in child- 
hood ; namely, Charles, Eva, Lora, and 
Edwin. 

Mr. Child is a comrade of Charles Devins 
Post, No. 27, G. A. R. 



QTLDEN B. SPOONER, an enterprising 
h\ lumber manufacturer of Hardwick, 
yd|A was born in this town ; November 
^""' 12, 1824, son of Bradford and Are- 
thusa (Earl) Spooner. His paternal grand- 
father, who was a pioneer of the place, 
reared four sons ; namely, Bradford, Grover, 
Barnabas, and Charles C. 

Bradford Spooner in early life was engaged 
in lumbering and brick-making, both of which 
occupations he followed quite extensively in 
connection with farming. He lived to be 
about eighty-four years old. In politics he 
was successively a Whig and a Republican. 
His wife, Arethusa, bore him nine children, 
six of whom are living, namely: Sarah O, 
who married Charles Woods, and resides upon 
the old homestead; Alden B., the subject of 
this sketch; Harmon C. Spooner, of Waltham, 
Mass.: Carrie E. , the widow of George R. 
Paige, late of Cambridge, Mass. ; Henry A., 
a lumber manufacturer of Hardwick; and Jane 
M., who became the wife of A. S. Barr, of 
Cambridge, and died in 1898. The others 
were: Albert H., Maria, and John F. R. 
Spooner. When the mother died she was 
over seventy years old. Both parents were 
members of the Congregational church. 

Alden B. Spooner acquired a public-school 
education in Hardwick. When a young man 
he engaged in the manufacture of lumber, 
which he has since followed, in company with 
his brother, Henry A. Spooner. Their saw- 
mills, which have been in the possession of 
the family for many years, and which were 
three times rebuilt, are well equipped with 
modern machinery driven by water-power. In 
them are produced all kinds of long and short 
lumber, matched boards, and other building 
material. The Spooner brothers are also 
large land-owners. Since 1857 they have 
jointly cultivated a farm of five hundred acres, 
keeping an average of twenty head of cattle. 

At the age of thirty-three Mr. Spooner con- 
tracted with Sarah M. Morton the first of his 
two marriages. His second wife, whose 
maiden name was Julia Alden, died in March, 
1894. He has one son, Stephen H. Spooner, 
who resides in West Boylston, Mass., and is 
engaged in the manufacture of varnish in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



167 



Worcester. Politically, Mr. Spooner is a Re- 
publican. He has served acceptably as Over- 
seer of the Poor and Superintendent of Streets 
for three years. His aid and influence can al- 
ways be depended upon to help all measures 
likely to benefit the town. He attends the 
Congregational church. 




MUMNER STOCKVVELL, the pro- 
prietor of Prospect Hill Farm in 
Hardwick, was born in New Brain- 
tree, Mass., December 31, 1847, son 
of Simon and Abiah Sophia (Gage) Stock- 
well. His grandparents were Simon and 
Dolly Stockwell. Simon was a nail-maker 
and a farmer. The greater part of his life 
was spent in Prescott, where he died in his 
eighty-fourth year. His wife lived to be 
eighty-six. 

Simon Stockwell, Jr., who was born in 
Prescott, Mass., June 24, 181 1, and resided 
there until 1846, followed the business of a 
stone-layer in connection with farming. In 
the fall of 1847 he bought a part of the farm 
in Hardwick which his son now owns, and 
took possession April 1, 1848. He added 
more land to the original acreage, and he 
tilled the soil industriously for the rest of his 
active period. His death occurred April 23, 
1897. In politics he was a Democrat. His 
wife, a native of New Salem, born December 
25, 1822, whom he married March 11, 1846, 
had three children, namely: Sumner, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Emma J., born June 8, 
1858, who is the wife of George H. Vachon, 
and resides in West Gardner, Mass. ; and Ida 
J., born July 26, 1863, who died June 22, 
1879. The mother died at the homestead, 
May 31, 1898. 

Sumner Stockwell acquired his education 
in the district schools of Hardwick. He has 
resided at Prospect Hill Farm for the greater 
part of his life. Having succeeded to its 
possession after his father's death, he is the 
owner of one hundred and fifty acres. The 
estate is devoted chiefly to dairying, for 
which from twenty to twenty-five cows are 
kept. On June 1, 1875, Mr. Stockwell was 
united in marriage with Imogene Lydia Gage, 



who was born in Sunderland, Mass., March 
1, 1857, daughter of Amasa W. and Lydia 
(Carpenter) Gage. Her father was born in 
New Salem, June 4, 1826; and her mother 
was born July 30, 1827, in Brattleboro, Vt., 
where they now reside. Mr. Gage is a pros- 
perous farmer, and is still attending to his 
every-day duties. He is the father of two 
children — Imogene Lydia and Frederick W. 
The latter, who was born April 26, i860, 
lives in Brattleboro. In politics Mr. Stock- 
well is a Republican. A member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, he is the present Worship- 
ful Master of Mount Zion Lodge in Barre. 
He has no children. 




ENRY H. PIKE, one of the foremost 
men of Paxton and the present 
chairman of its Board of Selectmen, 
was born in Spencer, Mass., March 
14, 1843. His parents were Sylvanus R. and 
Margaret C. (Sylvester) Pike, the latter of 
whom was born and bred in Leicester, 
Worcester County. The father, born in 
Stark, Coos County, N. H., was a direct de- 
scendant of Robert Pike, a prominent pioneer 
of that part of the Granite State. Very early 
in life he removed to Massachusetts, and 
thereafter lived at different times in various 
towns, including North Brookfiel.d, Hopkin- 
ton, Holden, Spencer, and Leicester. He 
died in Leicester, April 24, 1880. Of the 
children born to him and his wife, the follow- 
ing survive: Maria, the wife of Austin E. 
Skiff, of Paxton; Henry H., the subject of 
this sketch; Horace S., a prominent contrac- 
tor of Worcester, Mass. ; and Ophelia L., the 
wife of Martin L. Olmstead, of Paxton. 

Henry H. Pike was but a few months old 
when his parents returned to the town of 
Stark, N.H., where he spent the first ten 
years of his life. During the ensuing five 
years he lived with them in Holden, From 
there he accompanied them to Leicester, 
where he resided until he reached his 
majority. He gleaned his early education in 
the district schools of these towns. In early 
manhood he learned the trade of a boot-maker, 
and subsequently followed it for some time. 



1 68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



For the past fifteen years he has been suc- 
cessfully engaged in agriculture at Paxton, 
where he has a well-improved farm of one 
hundred acres. He makes a specialty of 
dairying, and has an extensive lumber busi- 
ness. He has also been a superintendent and 
contractor in the construction of State roads. 
Politically, Mr. Pike is a sound Republi- 
can. He has served most satisfactorily in 
the Boards of Selectmen and Overseers of the 
Poor for several terms, being at present the 
chairman of each. He was also Tax Collector 
for five successive years, a Constable for a 
long time, a Highway Commissioner for 
a number of terms, a Justice of the Peace for 
many years, and he was formerly one of the 
trustees of the public library. On March 3, 
1864, he married Miss Pauline H. Holmes, of 
East Boston, Mass. They have four children, 
namely: Elsie O. , the wife of Arthur Thomp- 
son, of Worcester, Mass. ; Charles S. ; Walter 
H. ; and Philip A. 




ARREN TYLER, M.D., who for 
nearly a half-century was the lead- 
ing physician and surgeon of North 
Brookfield and vicinity, was born here, Febru- 
ary 6, 1 8 19. His parents, David and Nancy 
(Bartlett) Tyler, both natives of the county, 
were well-known residents of North Brookfield 
for many years. The father was one of the 
prominent farmers of the town. 

The early years of Warren Tyler were spent 
on his father's farm, and his elementary educa- 
tion was obtained in the common schools near 
his home. Later he attended the academies 
at Leicester and Westfield. When a very 
young man he practised dentistry for a time, 
but beJieving that he could do greater good in 
the medical profession he began to read medi- 
cine with Dr. Oramel Martin, the leading 
physician of North Brookfield in his time. 
Three years after he entered the Jefferson 
Medical College at Philadelphia, which was 
then, as it is to-day, one of the leading pro- 
fessional schools of the country. His col- 
lege course was one of self-denial and hard 
work, as he was obliged to be entirely self- 
supporting. He did not graduate from the 



Jefferson College, but took his degree from 
the Pittsfield (Mass.) Medical School, and 
immediately thereafter began the practice of 
medicine in North Brookfield. This was in 
1848, from which date he continued in active 
practice here up to the time of his death on 
April 18, 1891. He achieved a wide reputa- 
tion for skill, both in medicine and in sur- 
gery, and people came to him from all the 
a'djoining towns for treatment. Although 
past seventy years of age at the time of his 
death, he had lost none of the skill that had 
marked his earlier practice, seeming rather to 
have gathered wisdom and knowledge with 
each succeeding year's experience. He was 
known not only in his own town, but through- 
out the county. 

On October 22, 1848, the Doctor was 
united in marriage with Diantha Walker, who 
was born in Exeter, Otsego County, N.Y. 
Her parents, John and Laura (Tucker) 
Walker, were residents of Exeter and natives 
of Woodstock, Conn. Mrs. Tyler, who sur- 
vives her husband, is a devoted member of the 
Union Congregational Church. Dr. Tyler 
took an active interest in town affairs, and 
was always ready to help a good cause. For 
many years he served as Selectman of the 
town, and he was for several terms a member 
of the School Board. He also represented the 
town in the legislature, first during the fif- 
ties, shortly before the war, and again in the 
seventies. In politics he was a Republican. 
He belonged to the Masonic Lodge at North 
Brookfield. In 1859 he travelled abroad, 
visiting most of the large hospitals and mak- 
ing observations concerning their methods of 
treatment and procedure. This trip was of 
great advantage to him in many ways, and he 
showed its helpful influence in his later prac- 
tice. When the war broke out, the Doctor 
offered his services as surgeon in the army, 
and shortly after he was appointed to the 
Thirty-sixth Massachusetts Regiment. After 
two years of unremitting effort in behalf of 
the brave men who were his companions, his 
health gave out, and he was obliged to return 
to North Brookfield In later years he was a 
member of Ezra Batcheller Post, No. 51, 
G. A. R. 



■^O- 







-^ '^ ' T 




V 






^ Bg i 




• we 

■ 



DAVID C. ALLEN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



171 



~\r\ AVID C. ALLEN, a real estate 

I 1 dealer of Leominster, was born in 
^ J&J this town, July 31, 1815, son of 
David and Sarah (Fullum) Allen. 
His father, who was a carpenter, worked in 
this vicinity for a number of years. The boy 
acquired his education in the corrimon schools 
of Leominster. For the purpose of breaking 
him of a tendency to run away from home, he 
was put to work on a farm two summers before 
he was eight years old. Then he began to 
learn the carpenter's trade, but he did not go 
to work in earnest until he was fourteen years 
of age. He was employed on Deacon Bur- 
rage's farm and with a Mr. Richardson, both 
of Leominster, for two years each. As a car- 
penter he first worked on a cotton factory at 
Wbalom Pond with his father. He was with 
his father for two years, then in Leominster 
Centre for a while, and in Worcester Centre 
two years. After this he returned to Leo- 
minster and started in business for himself. 
Subsequently he filled contracts for building 
dwellings, factories, and meeting-houses, em- 
ploying from thirty to forty men. Thrown by 
a runaway horse one day, he was so seriously 
injured that he was obliged to give up his 
business. 

In the early part of 1849 Mr. Allen was one 
of a party of forty-six, who, after chartering a 
steamboat at New York with the intention of 
going to California around Cape Horn, took 
the overland route on a prairie schooner drawn 
by oxen as the more practicable. They 
were nine months on the way, and suffered 
untold hardships and privations. Out of 
twenty yoke of oxen with which they started, 
two yoke lived to reach the journey's end. 
The others either died from exhaustion or were 
killed for food. The animals that were killed 
were so lean that only the heart and the tongue 
were fit to eat. Of the forty-six men, only 
five were in the company that reached Califor- 
nia. The others had either turned back dis- 
couraged or joined other parties. Mr. Allen 
was quite successful in his quest for gold. 
The first seven hundred dollars' worth that he 
dug out he sent in its original form to the 
Fitchburg bank. A similar amount sent by 
him to the United States mint was coined into 



twenty-dollar gold pieces. Fortune favored 
him from the very beginning. In the first 
two half-days in the mines he obtained 
twenty-five dollars' worth of gold each half- 
day. Then in the next three days he took 
out successively forty-eight dollars, fifty-eight 
dollars, and sixty-four dollars. In all he 
spent seven months in the mines and three 
years in California. On his return he en- 
gaged in building once more. At the time of 
the war he was engaged to build cavalry bar- 
racks in Annapolis, Md., and was there about 
three months. He was then employed on a 
pontoon train, was at Fortress Monroe for a 
while and in Yorktown to repair boats and 
see that they were at the proper stations. 
While a party of his men were engaged on one 
bridge, the Confederates attacked them, killing 
six of their number and wounding twelve. At 
this time Mr. Allen was executing another 
order at Ship Point. He had charge of men 
and boats at Fortress Monroe for about a year 
under General McClellan. Now he gives his 
whole attention to the real estate business. 
He owns two stores and twenty-one tenements. 
Though he is eighty-three years old, the spirit 
of adventure is still fresh within him, and he 
talks of going to Klondike. 

In 1S41 Mr. Allen was married to Lucy VV. 
Lyon, of Leominster, who died in 1853. A 
second marriage in 1855 united him with 
Maria A. Blodgett, of Vermont. Two of his 
children lived to be but three months of age. 
George A. Allen, their only surviving son, is 
a cucumber grower in West Leominster. The 
father has served on the Leominster Road 
Committee, was Constable for a number of 
years, and a member of the fire department for 
forty years, being for a part of the time an 
officer and practically giving his services gra- 
tuitously. He was a member of the artillery 
for seventeen years. Having helped to organ- 
ize the New England Association of Forty- 
niners, he has attended their annual and semi- 
annual meetings, except one held in Boston, 
for which he was two days late, having made 
a mistake in the date. He is the only surviv- 
ing charter member of Leominster Lodge, No. 
86, I. O. O. F. , which was organized some 
fifty years ago. Both he and Mrs. Allen were 



172 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in the Raymond excursion party of 1892 that 
visited California, when he was surprised to 
note the wonderful growth of the Golden State 
since 1849. 




■-jjENJAMIN B. NOURSE, Special 
r~s. Justice of the Westboro District 
-) J Court for a score of years, was born 
March 31, 1816, in Berlin, Worces- 
ter County, where his paternal grandfather, 
Benjamin Nourse, was formerly a prominent 
physician and surgeon. The father, Captain 
Th'eophilus Nourse, was a farmer by occupa- 
tion, and served as an officer in the State mi- 
litia, having charge of a company. He was 
active in local affairs; and prior to his death, 
at the early age of thirty-seven years, he 
served as Assessor and in other offices of 
minor importance. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Lois Brigham, survived him; and 
her death, at the advanced age of ninety-six 
years, when she was mentally and physically 
vigorous, was caused by an accident. Of 
their children, three are living, as follows: 
Benjamin B. , the subject of this sketch; Jane, 
the widow of Charles P. Rice, late of West- 
boro ; and Catherine, the widow of the late 
Lyman G. Stephens, of Marlboro. 

Benjamin B. Nourse lived in the family of 
the late Senator Elmer Brigham at Westboro 
from the age of nine years to that of fourteen, 
and then spent two years in Marlboro. Re- 
turning to Westboro, he served an apprentice- 
ship of five years at the carpenter's trade with 
Jonas Longley, his only compensation being 
his board and clothes. He subsequently 
worked as a journeyman carpenter until 1843, 
when he embarked in business for himself as 
a contractor and builder, confining his atten- 
tion mostly to fine grades of work. In i860 
he conceived the idea of manufacturing 
wooden trellis supports for plants; and, enter- 
ing extensively into this new industry, he 
soon acquired a wide reputation for his goods, 
which found a ready market, and were shipped 
to nearly every part of the Union. This 
business, in connection with other lines, he 
followed successfully for three decades, or 
until 1890, when he retired from active pur- 



suits. For ten years Mr. Nourse devoted 
much time to civil engineering, and he had 
charge of the construction of the Westboro 
sewerage system. For more than twenty 
years he has been Special Justice of the Dis- 
trict Court ; and during the war and for many 
years afterward, a period aggregating sixteen 
years, he was a member of the Board of Se- 
lectmen and its chairman for several terms. 
He was also an Assessor many years, and for 
a long time was one of the Prudential Com- 
mittee and the Moderator of parish meetings. 
In politics he is an uncompromising Demo- 
crat. Formerly very active in the ranks of 
that organization, he was a member of the 
Democratic State Committee, the chairman of 
the Democratic Town Committee, and was 
seven times his party's candidate for the State 
legislature. 

On October 19, 1843, Mr. Nourse married 
Mary Elizabeth Longley, a daughter of Jonas 
and Susan (Smith) Longley. The golden an- 
niversary of their union, October 19, 1893, 
was a very pleasant social event. Mr. and 
Mrs. Nourse have two children, namely: 
Walter B., an architect in Worcester and the 
junior member of the firm of Barker & 
Nourse; and Emma S., who was formerly a 
teacher in the public schools, and is a woman 
of literary tastes and talents, an artist in 
crayon and oils, and a member of the Library 
Committee, Walter B. Nourse married Miss 
Emma L. McClellan; and they have three 
children — Madeline G., Carlisle, and Clifton. 



OEL L. POWERS, one of the Hard- 
wick Board of Selectmen and a sub- 
stantial citizen, was born in Hardwick, 
November 17, 1844. He is the eldest 
son of the late Lysander and Hannah (Dexter) 
Powers. 

His grandfather, David Powers, was born 
in Derry, N.H., March 25, 1783. He was 
married in Langdon, N.H., February 17, 
1 8 14, to Mary Gleason, who was born in 
Langdon, April 18, 1791. He died in Hard- 
wick, December 17, 1866, and she on June 
29, 1844. About 1 83 1 he came to Hardwick, 
settled in the south-west part of the town, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



!73 



engaged in general farming. Prior to this he 
was a hotel-keeper. 

Lysander Powers was born in Petersham, 
Mass., November 28, 1816. He was a farmer 
and butcher. Coming to Hardwick the year 
before his marriage and while still a young- 
man, he purchased the farm on which his son 
now resides. It contains about one hundred 
and sixty-five acres, and he also owns con- 
siderable other land. Most of the improve- 
ments were made by him, including the erec- 
tion of the present house. He was a very 
stirring, energetic man and a good manager. 
In politics he was a Republican, in religion 
he was liberal. His townsmen elected him a 
member of the Board of Assessors, a position 
for which he was well qualified, and in which 
he rendered excellent service. He died De- 
cember 4, 1891, nearly three years after the 
death of his wife, Hannah Dexter Powers, 
which occurred on January 31, 1889. They 
had three sons, all of whom are living, 
namely: Joel L., of Hardwick; A. Frank, 
born August 31, 1846, a hotel-keeper in New 
York City; and Elmer D., born December 12, 
1853, a real estate dealer in Springfield, 
Mass. 

Joel L. Powers was educated in the Hard- 
wick schools and at Wilbraham Academy, 
which he attended one term. He remained at 
home, and for twenty years before his father's 
death had the management of the farm. In 
fact, he has practically carried on the farm 
since he was a boy. In addition to the home- 
stead property he owns about four hundred 
acres elsewhere. He formerly conducted a 
retail business, but now devotes his attention 
to the wholesale trade, and buys and sells live 
stock. On the home farm he keeps a dairy of 
eighteen cows and other stock. He is the 
manager of the Hardwick Co-operative Cream- 
ery, of which he was one of the organizers 
and one of the original stockholders. Besides 
attending to his own affairs, he has settled 
many estates, and is still sought for this pur- 
pose, such is the confidence placed in his abil- 
ity and integrity. 

Mr. Powers was first married on New 
Year's Day, 1866, when Jane E. Knight be- 
came his wife. She was born in Hardwick, 



December 21, 1842, daughter of Albert E. 
and Electa A. (Phelps) Knight, both of whom 
have passed away. She died August 4, 1889. 
On April 10, 1894, Mr. Powers married Mrs. 
Caroline A. Severance, widow of Levi Sever- 
ance. He has no children by either marriage. 
A Republican in political affiliation, Mr. 
Powers has been chairman of the Republican 
Town Committee for several years past. He 
has filled with credit nearly all the offices 
within the gift of his townsmen. At the 
present time he is second Selectman, and has 
been a member of the board for ten successive 
years with the exception of one year. He is 
chairman of the Board of Assessors, of which 
he has been a member twenty-three years and 
chairman the past twenty. He is serving his 
fourth year as Tax Collector, and is Superin- 
tendent of Streets, a position that he has held 
for fourteen years. Mr. Powers is a member 
of the Congregational church, and is treasurer 
of the society, in which capacity he has 
served for many years. 



LTrANKLIN WALLACE EDWARDS, 
p M.D., a successful homoeopathic physi- 
cian of Southbridge, was born in 
Wheeling, W.Va., December 31, 1856. A 
son of Dr. Edward W. and Catharine Rosalba 
(Diffenderffer) Edwards, he represents an old 
Maryland family of repute, whose estates are 
located in Kent County, on the eastern shore. 
Edward W. Edwards, M.D., the father, a na- 
tive of Maryland, having acquired his profes- 
sional education in Baltimore, practised as an 
allopathic physician in Wheeling, Chicago, 
and other places, until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1 891. He was a member of the 
Masonic order. Catharine, his wife, who was 
a native of Baltimore, became the mother of 
two children: James A. Edwards, now of the 
Chicago commission house J. A. Edwards & 
Co. and a member of the Board of Trade of 
that city; and Franklin W., the subject of 
this sketch. 

Franklin Wallace Edwards acquired his 
early education at private schools in Chicago. 
Later he pursued a course at Helmuth Col- 
lege, London, Ont., and was graduated from 



*74 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Rush Medical College in Chicago, class 
of 1876, with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. After a stay of six months at the Cook 
County Hospital as attending physician, he 
became associated with his father in Chicago, 
where he practised as an old school physician 
for some years. Subsequently he spent a year 
in Kinsale, Westmoreland County, Virginia. 
Then he was a Special Examiner in the United 
States pension office at Washington, D. C, for 
a period, at the end of which he resigned. 
After residing in Burlington, Vt., for a time, 
he went to Meriden, N.H., where he took up 
the practice of homoeopathy. Since 1891 he 
has resided in Southbridge, where he has won 
success as a homoeopathic physician and sur- 
geon. For a time he was the town physi- 
cian. He is a member of both the Worcester 
County and Massachusetts State Homoeo- 
pathic Medical Societies and of the American 
Institute of Homoeopathy. The Medical Rec- 
ord has had several interesting articles upon 
surgery from his pen, and he is a frequent 
correspondent of the medical magazines. 

On January 18, 1882, Dr. Edwards was 
united in marriage with Helen M. Kingsland, 
a daughter of A. W. and Helen (Cutting) 
Kingsland, of Chicago. In politics the Doc- 
tor is a Democrat. An esteemed Mason, he 
belongs to Ouinnebaug Lodge, F. & A. M. ; 
Doric Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; and 
Hiram Council, Royal and Select Masters. 
He has also a fellowship in the Royal Ar- 
canum, and acts as medical examiner for its 
local council. In the Baptist church, of 
which he is an active member, he is the 
chairman of the Prudential and Building Com- 
mittees. 



cm* 



EORGE L. CLEMENCE, a promi- 
\ '*) I nent dairyman of Southbridge and an 
ex-member of the Massachusetts 
legislature, was born in Great Barrington, 
Mass., February 17, 1852, son of Harvey and 
Maryette (Marsh) Clemence. The paternal 
grandfather, Luther Clemence, a native of 
Charlton, Mass., who followed agriculture 
during the active period of his life, died in 
i860, aged sixty-two years. He was quite ac- 



tive in public affairs, and served as a member 
of the Board of Selectmen. The maiden 
name of his wife was Marcy McKinstry. 
Harvey Clemence, son of Luther, was born in 
Southbridge in 1817. He learned the trade 
of a dyer, which he followed in connection 
with farming until his retirement some ten 
years ago. He is now residing with his son. 
Maryette, his wife, who was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, daughter of Perley and Hannah 
(Gerald) Marsh, came to Massachusetts with 
her parents when a child. She has had two 
children: Emily A., born in 1841, who died 
in 1859; and George L., the subject of this 
sketch. 

George L. Clemence has resided in South- 
bridge since he was three years old. After 
acquiring his elementary education in the 
common schools he attended Nichols Acad- 
emy in Dudley and Dean Academy in Frank- 
lin, Mass. At the age of twenty years he 
took charge of the home farm on Clemence 
Hill, and has since given his attention to the 
raising of garden truck and dairying. He 
keeps about thirty cows, and sells his milk to 
regular customers in Southbridge. In 1894 
he built a commodious stable, having all 
the modern improvements and especially de- 
signed for securing light, ventilation, and 
sanitary conveniences. He has made the 
treatment of tuberculosis a special study, is 
well informed upon all matters relating to the 
care of a dairy, and uses the standard cooler 
for aerating his milk. On December 3, 1872, 
he was joined in marriage with Emily Mc- 
Kinstry, a daughter of Prebostus and Jane 
(Carpenter) McKinstry, of Southbridge. 
Mrs. Clemence is the mother of three chil- 
dren, namely: Emily J., born September 28, 
1S73, who is now the wife of Everett Carpen- 
ter, of Southbridge; George H., born July 2, 
1879, who married Susa Alton, of Dudley, 
daughter of Erastus Dudley, and resides at 
home; and Elliot M. Clemence, born October 
31, 1885, also at home. 

During the years 1887 and 1888 Mr. Clem- 
ence was a member of the Board of Select- 
men, and he has been upon the Board of Sink- 
ing Fund Commissioners for the past five 
years. He was elected to the House of Rep- 




ABEL S. WOLFE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



177 



resentatives in 1888, and served in the Com- 
mittee on Agriculture. For nine years he 
has been a member of the State Board of 
Agriculture; a member of the Dairy Bureau 
for seven years; and a member of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the State Grange, Patrons 
of Husbandry, for five years. In 1897 he was 
a prominent candidate at the Republican Sen- 
atorial Convention. He belongs to Quine- 
baug Lodge, F. & A. M. ; and Phoenix Coun- 
cil, Royal Arcanum; and he attends the Con- 
gregational church. 




"ON. HARRIS C. HARTWELL in 
his time was regarded as the lead- 
ing member of the Fitchburg bar. 
Born in Groton, Mass., December 
28, 1847, he was a son of Benjamin F. and 
Emma (Whitman) Hartwell. His father, 
also a native of Groton, Mass., was a contrac- 
tor and builder. 

After fitting for college at Lawrence Acad- 
emy, Groton, Harris C. Hartwell graduated 
from Harvard in the class of 1869. In the 
same year he began to study law in the office 
of the Hon. Amasa Norcross, of Fitchburg. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1872, and in 
1874 he became Mr. Norcross's partner. He 
soon established a reputation for honorable 
and successful practice, became especially 
strong as a jury lawyer, and he had few equals 
in Worcester County. His cases were care- 
fully prepared, and he won the respect of op- 
posing counsel and the confidence of the court 
and jury by the fairness with which they were 
presented. Mr. Hartwell was a favorite with 
his confreres, and was always ready to encour- 
age and help a younger brother. As a mem- 
ber of society, too, he was very popular. 
With a fund of anecdote and being quick at 
repartee, he brightened many a dull hour in 
court, and was the life of many a social 
gathering. Outside of his legal business he 
was connected with a number of financial en- 
terprises. He was vice-president and a trus- 
tee of the Worcester North Savings Institu- 
tion, a director of the Fitchburg Shoe Tip 
Company and of the Fitchburg & Leominster 
Street Railway Company, and the vice-presi- 



dent and a member of the Board of Managers 
of the Massachusetts Mutual Aid Society. 

Mr. Hartwell was married in 1877 to Effie 
M. F., daughter of Daniel Needham, of Gro- 
ton. Two children blessed their union: Nor- 
cross Needham, born in Fitchburg, Mass., in 
1 SS 1 ; and Harold Hall, born in 1891. Mr. 
Hartwell was a leading member of the Repub- 
lican party in this section, and if he had lived 
he would probably have been the first member 
of Congress from the new. Fourth District. 
He was a member of the Fitchburg School 
Board from 1874 to 187S; was City Solicitor 
from 1877 to 1887; was a Representative in 
the State legislature in 1883, 1884, and 1885; 
and a State Senator in 1887, 1888, and 1889. 
In 1889 he served with marked ability as 
president of the Senate. It has been said 
that "to each of these positions he brought 
the full measure of earnest, honest effort, and 
his services were of signal value to the city 
and the Commonwealth." He attended relig- 
ious worship at the Unitarian church. His 
death on December 9, 1891, evoked many 
tributes to his manly worth and ability. 




STOWEL WOLFE, a leading 
arket-gardener 



was born at Saxton's River, Rock- 
ingham County, Vt. , on the third 
day of October, 1853, son of Abel and Sarah 
(Miner) Wolfe. His grandfather, William 
Wolfe, a native of Germany, who was a farmer, 
came to this country in early life, and became 
one of the pioneer settlers of Rockingham 
County. William's wife was also born in 
Germany. They had five children, three sons 
and two daughters. 

Abel Wolfe, who was born in Rockingham 
County, Vermont, died in Langdon, N.H., at 
the age of seventy-two. He was a cattle 
dealer and drover, buying fat cattle for the 
Boston market and driving them to that city, 
sometimes every week, sometimes not oftener 
than once a month. This was before railroad 
lines were as numerous as they now are. An 
energetic business man, he was very suc- 
cessful. During two sessions he occupied a 
seat in the State legislature. About 1832 he 



178 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



married Sarah Mirier, of Vermont, who died in 
1863, at the age of forty-nine, and was buried 
beside him in Saxton's River cemetery. Of 
their twelve children, Abel and William died 
at the ages, respectively, of eight and nine 
years. The others, all of whom reached ma- 
turity, were : Byron, now deceased ; Sarah, who 
is the wife of George W. Read, a Kansas 
farmer; John C, also deceased, who was a 
Corporal of infantry in the Civil War, and was 
slightly wounded in the service; Sophronia, 
deceased, who married John Marble, of Nashua; 
Lydia, who is the wife of George W. Ramsey, 
of Langdon, N. H. ; George W. Wolfe, who re- 
sides in Texas, on the Gulf coast; Edgar C. , 
formerly a cavalryman in the Civil War, now 
a resident of Melrose and in business in Bos- 
ton ; Abel S., subject of this sketch; Eleazer, 
who resides in Leicester, Mass. ; and Flora, 
who is the wife of Henry Noyes, of Maiden, 
Mass. 

Abel Stowel Wolfe received his education 
in the common schools. In his thirteenth 
year he was bound out on a farm. At the age 
of seventeen he bought his time for one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars, and subsequently hired 
out to a market-gardener near Boston, working 
at first by the month and later by the year. 
For thirteen years he was in the employ of 
S. R. Payson on the Cushing farm in Bel- 
mont, the most noted farm of the time in that 
locality. Three years after his marriage he 
came to Auburn and bought forty acres of land. 
To this he has since added fifty acres, and he 
has now one of the most successful and best 
appointed market-garden farms in the district. 
He has immense hot-beds. In all, his green- 
houses cover thirty-four thousand feet, or 
three-quarters of an acre, which is claimed to 
be the largest area under glass owned by an 
individual in this part of Massachusetts. The 
principal crops grown under glass are lettuce, 
cucumbers, and dandelions for midwinter. 
One greenhouse, two hundred and fifty-six by 
twenty-two feet, is devoted entirely to dande- 
lions, while another has seven thousand square 
feet entirely devoted to lettuce culture. Mr. 
Wolfe's market is chiefly in Worcester; but 
he also makes shipments to New York City, 
Washington, and Baltimore. The largest 



market-gardener in Auburn, his annual busi- 
ness amounts to several thousands of dollars. 
The estate, now situated just outside the city 
limits, is undoubtedly destined to become a 
part of Worcester at no very distant day. 

Mr. Wolfe was married on December 15, 
1876, to Marietta Putnam, a native of Spring- 
field, Montpelier County, Vt. , and daughter of 
Joseph and Sarah (Putnam) Putnam. Her 
parents, although having the same name, were 
not related. Mr. Putnam, who was a farmer, 
died on July 9, 1881, aged seventy-five years; 
and his wife died on March 13, 1877, at the 
age of sixty-nine. They are buried in Spring- 
field, Vt. Their children were: Sarah Ann, 
Elvira, Morris, Elizabeth, Sylvester, Ben- 
jamin, Marietta, George Frank, Simon, and 
Vesty Ann. Elizabeth, who died at the age 
of twenty-eight, was the wife of Jackson 
Gould. Sylvester died on November 10, 
1896, leaving a widow, Ellen Rollins. Ben- 
jamin died in 1875, leaving four children. 
George Frank, a resident of Springfield, Vt., 
married Lois Rice, and is the father of two 
children. Simon married Laura Gould, and 
has four children, all of whom reside with him 
in Springfield, Vt. Vesty Ann, now of 
Springfield, Vt. , is the widow of Bryant Lock- 
wood, who was a volunteer soldier near the 
close of the war. Benjamin Putnam served in 
the Civil War for three years as a member of 
the Third Regiment of Vermont Infantry, and 
Sylvester was a nine months' man near the 
close of the war. Mr. and Mrs. Wolfe have 
been the parents of two sons — Walter Edgar 
and Harry P. Wolfe. The first of these, who 
was born on May 6, 1879, in Belmont, assists 
his father in business, and drives the market 
wagon. Harry P. was born January 20, i< 



Ye)EANDER T. KIRBY, a progressive 
lj| agriculturist of Paxton, widely and 
X ^y _ favorably known as the Town 
Treasurer, was born in the neigh- 
boring town of Spencer, February 25, 1841. 
His parents, John and Mary R. (Brigham) 
Kirby, both Canadians by birth, came to the 
States soon after their marriage. After 
spending several years in various towns in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



179 



Worcester County, they removed to Verrnont, 
where the father afterward died. The mother 
is now also deceased. 

Leander T. Kirby was but a child when his 
parents became residents of the town of Ox- 
ford. Here from the age of nine years until 
he was sixteen he worked in a cotton factory 
for a large portion of each year, and attended 
the common schools of the place during the 
rest of those years. Then he learned the 
shoemaker's trade, and had followed it for 
some time, when the Civil War broke out. 
Having enlisted on July 12, 1861, he was 
mustered into Company E, Fifteenth Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Infantry, which became a 
part of the Second Corps of the Army of the 
Potomac. With his regiment he was in the 
battles, of Ball's Bluff, Fair Oaks, the seven 
days' battles before Richmond, at Antietam, 
Fredericksburg, and Bristoe Station, Va. On 
November 27, 1863, in a skirmish at either 
Mine Run or Locust Grove, he received a 
gunshot wound, and was captured by the Con- 
federates, who held him as a prisoner for five 
months in a Southern hospital and prison. 
In March, 1864, he was duly exchanged, and 
on the 12th of the following July he was mus- 
tered out of the service. Thereupon he re- 
turned to Oxford. In 1871 Mr. Kirby estab- 
lished himself in Paxton as a boot-maker. 
After carrying on that business for' fifteen 
years, he engaged in farming, which he has 
since successfully followed. Since coming 
here he has been prominently identified with 
the leading interests of the town. For a num- 
ber of terms he was Selectman, being the 
chairman of the board for two years. He was 
Assessor for one year, and he is now serving 
his seventh consecutive year as Town Treas- 
urer. While a strong Republican in politics, 
he is conscientiously devoted to the interests 
of the town 

H. Marshall Post, No 
Rutland, Mass. 

On March 25, 1866, Mr. Kirby married 
Miss Isabella Lane. Born in New Bruns- 
wick, she is a daughter of Archibald and Jo- 
anna (Cowlden) Lane, the former of whom 
was born and reared in Scotland, and the 
latter in New Brunswick. Mr. and Mrs. 



He is a comrade of the George 
127, G. A. R., of 



Kirby have four children, namely: Eva G., 
the wife of John A. Woodbury, of Worcester, 
Mass.; Arthur L., also of Worcester; Myrtis 
I., who graduated from the Worcester Normal 
School, and is now teaching in the public 
schools of that city; and Cora K., who is at 
home. 



EEVI BADGER CHASE, of Stur- 
bridge, was born in Canterbury, N.H., 
October 24, 1833, and received 
his education at the public schools 
of that town and J. C. Nutting's private 
school. He married October 24, 1858, Ma- 
tilda Fiske Plimpton, of Sturbridge, and has 
since resided there as a farmer. As a de- 
fender of the Union he served in Company F, 
Fifty-first Massachusetts Regiment; is a mem- 
ber of Post No. 173, G. A. R. ; has been Ad- 
jutant ten years and post historian; has been 
a member of the' Public Library Committee 
twenty years; and is on the Board of School 
Committee. He is a life member of the 
Worcester Society of Antiquity and corre- 
sponding member of the Medfield Historical 
Society and the Quabaug Historical Society. 
He compiled and published "A Genealogy 
and Historical Notices of the Family of 
Plimpton or Plympton in America and of 
Plumpton in England." He wrote the articles 
on the history of Sturbridge (vol. i.) and 
Southbridge (vol. ii.) published in J. W. 
Lewis's History of Worcester County. 

He made a map of the town of Sturbridge 
by plotting the lots in their relative position, 
as surveyed and described in the book of rec- 
ords by the original proprietors of the then 
unoccupied land. The map made available 
much historical matter hitherto unknown, the 
most important being the discovery of the lo- 
cation of a section of the earliest path between 
Boston and Springfield. He read a paper 
("Tantousque in Nipnet") before the Worces- 
ter Society of Antiquity, April 2, 1895, 
published in the society's proceedings of that 
year, in which it was argued that this is a re- 
discovery of a section of the route of the most 
ancient "Connecticut Path," and that it fol- 
lowed an important path of the Indians con- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



necting the converging long-distance-paths 
from points on the sea coast, all the way from 
Boston to New London, and those paths that 
diverged to various points in the valley of the 
Connecticut River. The location of Indian 
villages along the way was also described. 

Subsequently he found a direct statement of 
the Rev. John Eliot in 1649 and, in the 
archives of the State, Woodward and Saffery's 
map of their route to Connecticut River and 
return in 1642, that prove clearly that he has 
discovered precisely a section of the route of 
all the parties passing and repassing overland 
between the Connecticut River and the settle- 
ments on Massachusetts Bay during the period 
from 1633 to 1648. To bring before the pub- 
lic the result of the last-mentioned discover- 
ies, he read a paper upon the subject before 
the Ouabaug Historical Society at Warren, 
June 9, 1897. This is "The Bay Path" of 
Dr. J. G. Holland's historical novel bearing 
that title. 

L. B. Chase had brothers and sisters: 
Charles, 1809-64, Meredith, N.H. ; the 
Rev. William P., 1812-74, South Vineland, 
N.J., Free Baptist denomination; Mary M., 
1814-53, unmarried; Permelia W., 1818- 
74, married in 1847 Sylvester F. Sargent; 
the Rev. Uriah, 1820-88, Waterboro, Me., 
Free Baptist; Joanna S. , 1823-67, married in 
1850 Rufus Boynton, Canterbury, N.H. ; and 
Sarah E. , 1825-88, married in 1857 Stephen 
Hadley, Belmont, N.H. 

Son of Levi Chase, of Canterbury, N.H., 
farmer, born 1782, died 1854 (married in 1808 
Sarah Page, 1789- 1846, daughter of Reuben 
Page, 1763-1816, New Sharon, Me., wife 
Sarah Sanborn, son of John Page, 1729-, 
of Epping, N. H., wife Lydia Sanborn; son of 
David Page, 1703-85, of "Pagetown," North 
Hampton, N.H., wife Ruth Dearborn; son 
of Christopher Page, 1670-1751, of Hampton, 
N. H., wife Abigail Tilton; son of Thomas 
Page, 1639-86, of Hampton, wife Mary 
Hussey; son of Robert Page, born in Eng- 
land, 1604-79, settled at Hampton, N.H. ; 
son of Robert Page, of Ormsby, Norfolk 
County, England) ; son of Edward Chase, 
1 754— 1 8 14, Canterbury, N.H., married Mary 
Moore, enlisted May 30, 1775, in Colonel 



Enoch Poor's New Hampshire regiment, re- 
enlisted September 23, 1776, in Colonel 
Thomas Tash's regiment, New Hampshire 
Continentals (see Revolutionary Rolls, New 
Hampshire State papers) ; son of Jonathan, 
1730-1808, Loudon, N. H., married Anne 
Taylor; son of Jonathan, 1707-44, Stratbam, 
N.H., married Lydia Rollins; son of Jonathan, 
1 683-1 749, Stratham, married Joanna Palmer; 
son of Thomas, 1654-1733, Newbury, Mass., 
married Rebecca Follansbee; son of Aquila, 
161 8-1670, Newburyport, married Ann 
Wheeler; son of Aquila, 1580-, Chesham, 
England, married Martha Jelliman; son of 
Richard, baptized in 1542, married Joan 
Bishop; son of Thomas Chase, of Hundrick, 
parish of Chesham, England. 



ESSE A. TAFT, one of the best known 
and most respected citizens of Milford, 
was born in the adjoining town of 
Mendon, February 8, 1857. A son of 
Amariah Aulando and Thankful S. (Wilkin- 
son) Taft, he comes of Scotch lineage. His 
first ancestors in this country were Robert 
Taft and his wife, who, with several sons, all 
born in England, settled in Mendon, near 
Nipmuck Pond, in 1679 or 1680. The line 
of descent from Robert is traced through 
Daniel, Caleb, Jotham, and Amariah to 
Amariah A. 

Amariah Aulando Taft, generally known as 
Esquire Taft, was a leading citizen of Mil- 
ford. In 1887 he was a member of the Board 
of Selectmen. With his associates of the 
board, Messrs. C. F. Claflin and E. L. Wires, 
he started a movement for good government 
that marked an epoch in the history of the 
town. He served for three years, during 
which time the community enjoyed an honest, 
dignified, and non-partisan administration of 
its public affairs. On January 10, 1893, 
shortly after he had returned from a trip to 
Boston, he died suddenly of heart failure. 
He was a man of great energy, activity, and 
force of character. Although he did a large 
business in executing mortgages and other 
legal papers, he never employed a clerk, pre- 
ferring to perform even the manual part of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



181 



work himself. He was a man generally liked 
and respected in the community. 

Jesse A. Taft received his general educa- 
tion in the graded schools and high school of 
Milford. Subsequently he took a course in 
the Boston University Law School, and in 
1883 was admitted to the bar in Worcester 
County. Shortly after he located in Milford, 
where he has since been engaged in a general 
law practice. While well known in the 
courts, he confines himself largely to office 
work. For six years he has been Town Solic- 
itor for Milford and for the same length of 
time Town Counsel for the town of Hope- 
dale. He is a director of the Milford Na- 
tional Bank of Milford, a trustee of the Sav- 
ings Bank, and he belongs to the Worcester 
County Bar Association and to the Alumni 
Association of Boston University. In 1884 
he married Ida F. Thompson, a daughter of 
Charles J. Thompson. His only son, Royal 
C. Taft, was born July 8, 1889. 



KUCIUS O. GIFFIN, the well-known 
musician of Barre, was born in this 
town, September 24, 1836, son of 
John W. and Achsa (Berry) Giffin. 
Abner Giffin, the paternal grandfather, came 
from Hardwick to Barre, where he resided for 
a time. Then he returned to Hardwick, and 
died there in 1836, aged nearly sixty-one 
years. He was twice married. His wife, 
Polly Stratton Giffin, died in 181 1. She 
had three children — ■ Lauriston, Samantha, 
and John W. Giffin. By his second wife, 
whose maiden name was Mary Wicker, there 
were five children; namely, Anna, Mary, 
James, Hosea, and Elbridge. 

John W. Giffin, the father, was born in 
Hardwick, August 4, 1804. Soon after his 
marriage he settled in Barre upon a part of 
his son's present farm, and tilled the soil in- 
dustriously until his death, which occurred 
May 20, 1874. In politics he was a Demo- 
crat. Achsa, his wife, who was born in Pres- 
cott, Mass., December 29, 181 1, had six chil- 
dren, of whom five grew to maturity and three 
are living. The latter are: Lucius O., the 
subject of this sketch; Mrs. Martha E. Flagg, 



of West Fitchburg, Mass.; and William H. 
Giffin, of Greenwich Village. The others 
were: Lauriston, Mary H., and Julia. The 
mother died August 1, 1882. 

Lucius O. Giffin was educated in the dis- 
trict schools of Barre. After completing his 
studies he turned his attention to agricult- 
ure. Succeeding to the possession of the 
home farm, he has increased it to one hundred 
and forty acres, which he devotes to the rais- 
ing of staple products. He is best known, 
however, as a violinist. For years he has 
been the leading musician in this section, 
playing for dances, concerts, receptions, etc., 
work that has been remunerative to him, as 
well as a source of pleasure both to him and 
the public. In politics he is a Republican. 
On March 29, 1871, he was united in mar- 
riage with Rosepha Paige. Born in Spencer, 
Mass., November 15, 1841, she is a daughter 
of Abram and Thankful B. (Hawkins) Paige. 
Mr. Paige was born in Oxford, N.H., in 181 5, 
and his wife in Winchester, N.H., in 1809. 
In his younger days he was a minister and 
later an eclectic physician. He died in 1865, 
aged fifty years. His wife died in March, 
1889. They were the parents of three chil- 
dren, of whom Rosepha, now Mrs. Giffin, is 
the only one living. The others were : Sabra, 
born November 5, 1840, who died March 22, 
1841; and Eletta, born July 4, 1844, who 
died September 11, 1849. Mrs. Giffin re- 
ceived a good musical education; and, being 
a fine pianist, she has assisted her husband 
for many years in his entertainments. She 
has two children: Charles H., born December 
21, 1 87 1, who married Bessie Lemon, and re- 
sides in Barre; and Marion I. Giffin, born 
December 24, 1882. On religious topics Mr. 
Giffin's opinions are inclined to be liberal, 
while Mrs. Giffin is an Episcopalian. 



Ji 



April 4 
(Drake 



AVID BRAINARD WIGHT, who 
is closely identified with the agri- 
cultural and industrial resources of 
Sturbridge, was born in this town, 
1849, son of David and Eunice F. 
Wight. The paternal grandfather, 



also named David, was born in Sturbridge, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



November 5, 1786. He was a civil engineer 
and a farmer, and he served as a Representa- 
tive to the General Court. His death oc- 
curred on March 28, 1861. He married Lu- 
cinda Marsh, who, born May 22, 1785, died 
December 17, i860. 

David Wight, who was born in Sturbridge, 
September 11, 181 1, completed his education 
at the Nichols Academy, Dudley, Mass., and 
afterward for several years was engaged in 
teaching school. Then, turning his attention 
to farming, he followed it for the rest of his 
active period. In 1861 he purchased the old 
Wight homestead of six hundred acres, situ- 
ated in the part of Sturbridge that was set off 
as the town of Southbridge in 18 16. He also 
carried on an extensive lumber business. In 
his later years he was a Republican. He 
served with ability as a Selectman, Assessor, 
Town Treasurer, and Overseer of the Poor. 
In religious belief he was a Congregationalist. 
He died in 1876. His wife, Eunice, a native 
of Easton, Mass., born February 1, 1810, 
whom he married on September 14, 1836, 
gave birth to five children, namely: Emily 
F., on July 10, 1837, who died August 14, 
1846; Mary L., September 14, 1839, who 
died November 8 of the same year; Ellen S., 
September 27, 1843, who is now Mrs. Witter; 
Mary A., March 15, 1847, who is now Mrs. 
Corey; and David B. , the subject of this 
sketch. The mother died May 5, 1875. 

After commencing his education in the 
public schools, David Brainard Wight gradu- 
ated from the Nichols Academy. Then for 
some time he was employed in a sash, door, 
and blind factory in Millbury, Mass. In 
1867 he purchased one hundred and twenty- 
four acres of his present farm, and later added 
twenty acres. The various improvements he 
has since made upon the land and buildings 
have rendered his place one of the best ap- 
pointed farms in this locality. In 1870 he 
built a grist-mill and two years later a plan- 
ing-mill. Besides general farming he con- 
ducts a thriving lumber business. His pres- 
ent dwelling occupies the site of the old 
Wight residence built one hundred years ago, 
which was moved to a position on the opposite 
side of the road. The old house is in a good 



state of preservation, and is still used as a 
dwelling. 

On June 1, 1870, Mr. Wight was united in 
marriage with Emily F. James, a daughter of 
Lyman and Harriet (Towne) James. Mrs. 
James was a native of Brimfield, and his wife 
was born in Southbridge, Mass. Mrs. Wight 
has had one son, David E., who, born August 
9, 1873, died August 21, 1878. Mr. Wight 
has been a Selectman and an Assessor. In 
1885 he ably represented his district in the 
legislature. Taking a lively interest in all 
matters relative to farming, he is vice-presi- 
dent of the Worcester South Agricultural So- 
ciety. 



W\ 



ALTER FREDERICK BROOKS, 
treasurer of the Worcester Corset 
Company, was born in this city, 
January 13, 1859, son °f Charles Edwin and 
Elizabeth Capron (Fanning) Brooks. His 
father was born in Worcester, August 15, 
1824, and his mother was a native of Con- 
necticut and a daughter of Henry Wilson and 
Sarah (Hale) Fanning. 

Mr. Brooks is a representative of the ninth 
generation of the family founded by Captain 
Thomas Brooks, who, with his wife, Grace, 
came to New England, and settled at Water- 
town in 163 1. This is the ancestral line: 
Captain Thomas, 1 Deacon Joshua, 2 Ensign 
Daniel, 3 Deacon John, 4 Captain Samuel, 5 
Deacon Samuel, 6 Deacon Nathaniel, 7 Charles 
Edwin, 8 Walter Frederick. 9 

Captain Thomas Brooks was one of the orig- 
inal proprietors of Concord, Mass., whither 
he removed in 1635, and resided there the 
rest of his life. Deacon Joshua Brooks, who 
was born about the year 1630, married Han- 
nah Mason on October 17, 1653, and lived in 
Concord. Ensign Daniel Brooks, son of Dea- 
con Joshua, born in Concord, November 15, 
1663, married Ann Merriam in 1690. His 
son, Deacon John Brooks, who was born Feb- 
ruary 12, 1 70 1, married Lydia Barker. Cap- 
tain Samuel Brooks, son of Deacon John, was 
born March 16, 1729-30, and was the first of 
the family to settle in Worcester, coming here 
about the year 1750. He married Mrs. Han- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'S3 



nah Davis Brown. Deacon Samuel Brooks, 
only son of Captain Samuel, was born in 
Worcester, Mass., June 10, 1755. He re- 
moved to Haverhill, N.H., and was Register 
of Deeds for Grafton County many years. He 
married Ann Bedel Butler, March 8, 1789. 
Ann Bedel was a daughter of Colonel Timothy 
Bedel, of Revolutionary fame, and had pre- 
viously married Dr. Thaddeus Butler. 

Deacon Nathaniel Brooks, second, the 
grandfather of Walter Frederick, was a son of 
Deacon Samuel, and was born in Haverhill, 
N. H., October 3, 1797. His parents removed 
from Haverhill with a large family of chil- 
dren, and settled in Stanstead, Canada, where 
they died and were buried, leaving descend- 
ants who have been well and honorably known 
in public affairs, among them a son Samuel, 
who was a member of the Canadian Parliament. 
At the age of twenty-one Nathaniel Brooks 
settled in Worcester, Mass., the home of his 
aged grandfather, who had died the previous 
year, 1817. He acquired prominence in pub- 
lic affairs prior to its incorporation as a city, 
serving as Selectman and in other town 
offices, and as a member of the General Court 
for two years. He was a Deacon of the Old 
South Church, and was highly esteemed for 
his many excellent qualities as a citizen and 
neighbor. He died November 3, 1S50. His 
wife, Mary Chadwick, who was a member of 
the family for which Chadwick Square was 
named, was born in Worcester, July 3, 1794. 
She died August 31, 1876. They were mar- 
ried on April 8, 1822, and they had ten chil- 
dren. The only one of the family living is 
Mary Chadwick, who was born November 27, 
1828, and is now the widow of John Ander- 
son, formerly of the firm of Anderson, Heath 
& Co., Boston. 

Charles Edwin Brooks completed his educa- 
tion at the Worcester Academy. When a 
young man he left the farm to enter mercan- 
tile life. After a service of four years in the 
office of the Daily Spy he entered the grocery 
business as a member of the firm of Brooks & 
Stearns, whose store was at 8 Front Street. 
He carried on business there ten or twelve 
years. During a part of the war of the Re- 
bellion he served as Commissary at New- 



bern, N.C. Upon his return to this city he 
became associated with his brother Horace 
and his brother-in-law, David H. Fanning, in 
the Worcester Skirt Company, which was 
afterward changed to the Worcester Corset 
Company. He was treasurer and librarian of 
the Worcester County Horticultural Society 
from 1879 until his death, which occurred 
December 22, 1890. On December 2, 185 1, 
he married Elizabeth Capron Fanning, who, 
with two sons, Arthur Anderson and Walter 
Frederick, survives him. Nearly seventy- 
six years of age, Mrs. Brooks is still bright 
and active. Her father, Henry Wilson Fan- 
ning, named above, was of the sixth genera- 
tion in descent from Edmund Fanning, who 
settled at what is now Groton, Conn., in 
1653. (For further notice of that family see 
sketch of David H. Fanning, which appears 
elsewhere in the Review.) Her mother was 
of the well-known Hale family, of Connecti- 
cut. Ella Brooks, only daughter of Charles 
E. and Elizabeth C. F. Brooks, died at the 
age of four years. The Rev. Arthur Ander- 
son Brooks, the elder son, a graduate of Har- 
vard University, class of 1879, an d tne Di- 
vinity School, class of 1884, was ordained 
and installed in 1885 minister of the Third 
Congregational (Unitarian) Society, Green- 
field, Mass. He resigned his charge in 1896, 
and is now abroad for study and recreation. 

Walter Frederick Brooks, the subject of 
this sketch, was graduated at the Worcester 
High School, class of 1877, fitted for college. 
Preferring, however, a business life, he en- 
tered the employ of George Crompton, and 
was in the office of the Loom Works about two 
years. The succeeding eleven years he was 
with William H. Morse, banker; and in 1891 
he, in partnership with J. F. Rock, leased the 
Worcester Theatre, which they carried on for 
three years. In January, 1896, he was 
elected treasurer of the Worcester Corset 
Company. Needless to say, his qualifications 
for this responsible position enable him to 
administer the financial affairs of the concern 
in a most satisfactory manner. 

In politics Mr. Brooks is a stanch Republi- 
can. He is a member of the Worcester 
County Commandery, Knights Templar, Order 



184 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Masons; of the Worcester Society of An- 
tiquity; the New England Historic Genealog- 
ical Society, Boston; and several other well- 
known organizations. He resides at 54 
Oueen Street, Worcester. 




pjENJAMIN A. JOURDAN, one of 
^~\ the best known men of Upton, was 
-si born in Grafton, Mass., in 1832. 
His father was David Jourdan, who 
came from Connecticut, and for many years 
was engaged in the provision business in 
Grafton. David also dealt quite extensively 
in cattle and sheep, which he collected in 
large droves from various places and resold to 
farmers in other localities. 

While still a boy, Benjamin A. Jourdan 
became familiar with the meat business. At 
the age of twenty-one he went to Upton, and 
engaged in business for himself. From that 
time until his retirement in 1895 he dealt 
largely in meat, which he purchased at Brigh- 
ton and of the neighboring farmers. Some 
years ago he embarked in the ice business in 
Upton, storing his crop in an old school-house 
until better accommodations could be pro- 
vided. He now disposes of about nine hun- 
dred tons per year. Also engaged in agricult- 
ure, he owns a good farm. In public affairs 
he has been conspicuous for many years, being 
a leading supporter of the Republican party in 
this section. His efforts to forward the best 
interests of the community are heartily appre- 
ciated by his fellow-townsmen. He is now 
serving his fourth year as chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen, and he has been a mem- 
ber of the Board of Assessors. He was a 
Representative to the legislature in 1880 and 
1895, serving in both terms upon the State 
House Committee, in which he helped to for- 
mulate the plans for enlarging the building. 
He has also presided at town meetings. 

Mr. Jourdan first married Ann M. Bellows, 
formerly a well-to-do resident of Farnums- 
ville. Her father was for many years a hotel- 
keeper, and also owned a good deal of land, 
upon which he built houses for sale. His 
last days were spent in retirement upon his 
farm. Mrs. Ann Jourdan was the mother of 



two children, both of whom died young. She 
died in April, 1893. A second marriage 
united Mr. Jourdan with Lizzie M. Gould, 
the adopted daughter of James Gould. Mr. 
Gould, who had previously been a fisherman at 
the Cape, followed the shoemaker's trade in 
Upton and Milford for a time. Subsequently 
he returned to the Cape, and was following 
his first occupation again, when his boat upset 
in a squall, and he, with two others, was 
drowned. Mrs. Jourdan was then thirteen 
years old. Mr. Jourdan has been the presi- 
dent of the Farmers' Club, and has on vari- 
ous occasions been marshal. He was made a 
Mason in Franklin Lodge. 



M 



EACON JAMES S. MONTAGUE, 
formerly a prominent business man 
?> J of Brookfield, son of Joseph and 
Elizabeth (Sears) Montague, was 
born in Cambridge, Vt. , March 19, 1818. 
The father, a native of Bennington, Vt., born 
July 6, 1 78 1, spent the greater part of his life 
in Cambridge, where he followed the carpen- 
ter's trade in connection with farming. Serv- 
ing as a soldier in the War of 1812, he took 
part in the battle of Plattsburg; and he was a 
leading spirit in town affairs. His wife, 
Elizabeth, who was born in Arlington, Vt., 
in July, 1783, was at the time of her marriage 
residing in Sutton, Conn. 

James S. Montague was educated in the 
common schools of his native town. In his 
youth, when not occupied with his studies, he 
assisted his father at the bench and upon the 
farm. When a young man, having come to 
North Brookfield, he worked at shoemaking 
there for some time. In 1843 ne located in 
Brookfield, where he engaged in currying 
leather. Then he began the manufacture of 
boots and shoes, which he carried on success- 
fully for a number of years. In 1873 a pul- 
monary affection, which eventually proved 
fatal, compelled him to relinquish active busi- 
ness and live in the South during the winter 
for the next few years. Afterward he trans- 
acted considerable fire and life insurance busi- 
ness. Upright and honorable, he had the 
confidence and respect of his fellow-towns- 




SULLIVAN G. PROCTOR. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



187 



men. As Selectman, Town Treasurer, and 
Representative to the legislature he rendered 
efficient services to the community. In poli- 
tics during his later years he was a Republi- 
can, having previously sided with the Free 
Soil movement and been a zealous abolition- 
ist. For thirty years in the Congregational 
church, he acted as a Deacon and led the 
singing; and he was an earnest advocate of 
temperance. He died December 15, 1879, in 
his sixty-second year. 

On June 2, 1843, Mr. Montague married 
Rhoda B. Potter, of North Brookfield, a 
daughter of Dr. Cheney and Lucy (Hunter) 
Potter. Dr. Potter, a native and for some 
years a Selectman of that town, was a well- 
known physician, with a large practice in 
North Brookfield, Spencer, Oakham, and New 
Braintree. He died in his fifty-fourth year. 
Of his children, there are three survivors: 
Rhoda B., who became Mrs. Montague; Laura 
H., the wife of William Montague, of North 
Brookfield; and Lucy H., the wife of James 
Pickens, of Middleboro, Mass. The late 
Deacon Montague was the father of three chil- 
dren, namely: Lucy E., the wife of W. W. 
Brown, a prominent lumber dealer of Port- 
land, Me.; Laura E., who is no longer liv- 
ing; and William F. Montague, now a resi- 
dent of Riverside, Cal. Mrs. Montague still 
occupies the homestead in Brookfield, and is 
sincerely beloved by a large circle of friends, 
who deeply appreciate her rare traits of char- 
acter. She is a member of the Congrega- 
tional church. 




'ULLIVAN G. PROCTOR, a re- 
tired business man of Fitchburg, 
was born in Reading, Vt. , July 1, 
1S08. His father, John Proctor, a 
native of Westford, Mass., was engaged in 
farming and carpentering during his active 
period, and lived to be ninety-one years old. 
John Proctor married Betsy Snow, of Lunen- 
burg, Mass., and she died at eighty-four. Of 
her eight children, Sullivan G. is the third 
and the only one living. 

. Sullivan G. Proctor served an apprentice- 
ship at the blacksmith's trade with his half- 



brother, Daniel Works, in Fitchburg, and 
later learned the machinist's trade with Martin 
Newton, a prominent man of the town. While 
yet a young man he engaged in the machine 
business on his own account, doing repairing 
and all kinds of iron work for a number of 
years. Subsequently he became associated 
with Luther Howard in the livery business on 
Oliver Street, under the firm name of Proctor 
& Howard. Three years later his partner 
withdrew, and Mr. Proctor continued the busi- 
ness alone for three years, when he sold out to 
his former associate. Afterward, in company 
with Nathan Tolman, he started in the iron 
business upon the site now occupied by Nicho- 
las & Frost's store, and continued there until 
the building of the railroad. Then the firm 
of Proctor & Tolman erected Rollstone Block, 
and removed their business to the basement of 
the new building. Some years later Mr. 
Proctor sold his interest to his partner, and 
after the latter's death he bought of the heirs 
a half-interest in the building. Once more 
associating himself with Luther Howard, he 
took a contract that employed him for six 
years, to prepare the wood used by the loco- 
motives of the Fitchburg Railway from 
Charlestown to this city and for the Vermont 
& Massachusetts Railway from Fitchburg to 
Brattleboro. About i860, in company with 
I. C. Wright, he purchased the hardware store 
carried on up to that time by a Mr. Wallace, 
and occupying the site of the present Dickin- 
son Block. Two years later that business was 
sold to Woodward & Fairbanks, and Mr. Proc- 
tor engaged in the coal business in company 
with James F. D. Garfield, under the firm 
name of Garfield & Proctor. A short time 
later he withdrew from the concern in favor of 
bis son, George N. Proctor, who is still a 
member of the firm; and the elder Proctor has 
since been engaged in attending to his real es- 
tate interests. 

In 1833 Mr. Proctor married for his first 
wife Mary Newton, daughter of Martin New- 
ton, of Fitchburg. She died in January, 

1 88 1, leaving one son, George Newton Proc- 
tor, born July 31, 1S42. On October 30, 

1882, Mr. Sullivan G Proctor married for his 
second wife Sibyl Jaquith, a daughter of John 



iSS 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



S. and Sarah B. Jaquith, well-known people 
of Ashby, Mass. George N. Proctor married 
Mary Newton, of Rochester, N.Y. , and has 
two sons: George N., Jr., born December 10, 
1S82; and James Sullivan Proctor, born No- 
vember 4, 1884. In politics Mr. Proctor was 
originally a Whig. Later he became a sup- 
porter of the Free Soil Party, and he has acted 
with the Republican party since its formation. 
He is a member of the Unitarian Parish. His 
business life has been successful as well as ac- 
tive, and he is widely known and highly re- 
spected as one of Fitchburg's representative 
citizens. Mr. Proctor occupies a pleasantly 
situated residence on Newton Place, which he 
erected in 1835. 




LIVER B. E. CHIPMAN, a retired 
baker of Southbridge, was born in 
Mendon, Mass., June 17, 1838, son of 
Stephen R. and Phoebe (Cass) Chip- 
man. The paternal grandfather was Stephen 
Chipman, a resident of Barre, Mass. The 
maiden name of his wife, whom he wedded in 
1796, was Ann Henry. He died on Decem- 
ber 17, 1827, and she in 1S30. 

Stephen R. Chipman, the father, who was 
born in Barre, July 4, 1798, followed the 
painter's trade in Mendon during his years of 
activity, and died in July, 1849. His wife, a 
daughter of John Cass, was born in that part 
of Mendon now Blackstone, July 1, 1806. 
Her father, born December 29, 1761, who was 
a son of Jonathan and Abigail (Salisbury) 
Cass, and came of English stock on the 
father's side, died in 1844. He married Jo- 
anna Hunt, who was born October 28, 1762. 
They had twelve children, of whom Phoebe 
was the eleventh-born. Stephen R. and 
Phcebe Chipman were the parents of three 
sons: Stephen R., who followed the painter's 
trade in Uxbridge, Mass., and died there, 
leaving a widow and two sons — James and 
Edward Chipman; William H., who is now 
employed at a spool and bobbin factory in 
Woonsocket, R.I. ; and Oliver B. E. Chip- 
man, the subject of this sketch. 

Having attended the public schools of 
Northbridge, Mass., Oliver B. E. Chipman 



was employed as a farm assistant for several 
years. Then he came to Southbridge, and 
opened a bakery in Pellett Block on Main 
Street in 1866. With the exception of two 
years he followed that business until 1895. 
On April 30, 1S71, he contracted the first of 
his two marriages with Ellen M. Macomber, a 
daughter of William and Mary Macomber, of 
Sturbridge, Mass. Of that union there were 
two children: Lillian I., born in May, 1873; 
and Oliver E., born in May, 1874. Both died 
in infancy. The mother passed away in 1875. 
At his second marriage Mr. Chipman wedded 
Julia A. Sibley, a daughter of Russell and 
Cyrene (Hall) Sibley, of Spencer, Mass., and 
a descendant of an old Sutton family. Her 
great-grandfather and grandfather were both 
named Paul Sibley; and the maiden name of 
her grandmother was Livermore. Mrs. Chip- 
man is the mother of one son, Frank Sibley 
Chipman, born May 30, 1877, who is a gradu- 
ate of the Southbridge High School. 

Politically, Mr. Chipman is a Republican. 
At one time he was chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, having been a member of that 
body from 1893 to 1898. In 1897 he was ap- 
pointed Superintendent of Streets. As a 
public official he is laboring diligently for the 
best interests of the town. He is a Master 
Mason, and belongs to Ouinebaug Lodge. 
His religious belief is the Universalists' 
creed. 




Harris. 



EDWIN HARRIS, one of the lead- 
ing merchants of Milford, was born 
May 18, 1830, in Marlow, N.H., a 
son of Almon and Phcebe (Sheldon) 
He is of Scotch ancestry, and is said 
to be a descendant of one of three brothers 
who were impressed into the English army, 
from which they deserted and came to Amer- 
ica. One located in Maine, one in Medway, 
Mass., and one in Rhode Island. The brother 
who settled in Medway (from whom the sub- 
ject of this sketch is descended) went thence 
to Nelson, now Harrisville, when a young 
man, and there carried on a successful woollen 
manufactory. An active man, of military 
temperament, he served as a soldier in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



189 



Indian wars. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Twitchel, was born in Dublin, N.H. 
They had six sons and three daughters. 

Bethuel Harris, the paternal grandfather of 
B. Edwin, was a widely known woollen manu- 
facturer, and resided in Nelson, N. H., which 
place is now known as Harrisville. His third 
son, Almon, was born in Nelson in the year 
1800. He continued his father's business in 
that town very successfully until 1826, when 
he married Phcebe Sheldon, and moved to 
Marlow, N.H., where he carried on a woollen 
business. In 1847 he moved to Penacook, 
N.H., and built the Dustin Island Woollen 
Mills, where he continued in the same busi- 
ness until his death, September 15, 1876. 
His wife, Phoebe, bore him three sons, 
namely: Ezra S. Harris, who was a prosper- 
ous woollen manufacturer in Penacook until 
his death in 1892; Almon A., now a retired 
woollen manufacturer; and B. Edwin, the 
special subject of this sketch. 

B. Edwin Harris was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Harrisville. After the removal 
of the family in 1847 to Penacook (then 
known as Fisherville) he worked in his 
father's woollen factory there until attaining 
his majority. Starting then in life on his 
own account, he secured a situation with the 
firm of Sears, Johnson & Putnam, wholesale 
clothiers in Boston, Mass., with whom he re- 
mained five years. In 1855 he came to Mil- 
ford, and embarked in business for himself as 
junior member of the firm of Woodward & 
Harris, dealers in clothing. One year later 
he purchased his partner's interest in the 
store, which he conducted under the name of 
B. E. Harris until 1888. In that year he ad- 
mitted his son, B. Edwin Harris, Jr., as 
junior partner of the firm of B. E. Harris & 
Son, under which style the business has since 
been carried on, notwithstanding the son's 
death in 1895. Since the latter event Mr. 
Harris has carried on the business alone, hav- 
ing one of the most complete gentlemen's fur- 
nishing and clothing houses in this section of 
the county. In politics he affiliates with the 
Republican party. He is known as a man of 
excellent financial ability, is president of the 
Home National Bank of Milford, and has been 



treasurer of the Milford Gas Company for over 
thirty years. 

On October 18, 1865, he married Abbie 
Mellen Eames, daughter of Charles T. Eames, 
of Milford. They have had five children, 
namely: B. Edwin Harris, Jr., who was born 
November 11, 1866, and died November 9, 
1895; Amelia Claflin, born April 7, 1868, 
who was educated in Lasell Seminary at Au- 
burndale, Mass. ; Frank Sheldon, who was 
born November 19, 1871, and died July 22, 
1873; Helen Sophia, born March 14, 1875, 
and Mary Capen, born November 5, 1877, 
both of whom are students at Smith College, 
Northampton. 



Wi 



LLIAM G. KEITH, senior mem- 
ber of the firm Keith & Hiscock, 
dealers in hardware, stoves, etc., in 
East Brookfield, was born in Chesterville, 
Me., December 22, 1855. A son of Joseph 
and Mercy (Gale) Keith, he is a descendant 
of a Presbyterian clergyman of distinction 
who was an early settler in Bridgewater, 
Mass. His paternal grandfather, Joseph 
Keith, Sr., was a resident of Chesterville. 
The father, who spent his lifetime in that 
town, followed the trade of a wool-carder and 
cloth-dresser. The mother was a native of 
Knox County, Maine. 

William G. Keith resided in Chesterville 
until he was fifteen years old. Then he went 
to Wilton, Me., where he served an appren- 
ticeship of seven years to the tinsmith's trade 
with H. S. Houghton. After some further 
time spent in Mr. Houghton's employment 
at journey-work, he came in 1879 to East 
Brookfield, and started in business on a small 
scale as a jobber and dealer in stoves, tinware, 
etc. In 1894 he began the erection of his 
present building, known as Keith Block; and 
in January, 1895, the firm of Keith & Hiscock 
was established in their new store, containing 
three floors and a basement, all of which are 
devoted to their business. The concern car- 
ries a large and varied line of hard and tin 
ware, including stoves, plumbing supplies, 
kitchen utensils, furniture, undertakers' 
goods, and other salable merchandise. One 



190 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of the most successful in this part of the 
county, the store is the main source of supply 
for a large territory. 

Mr. Keith contracted his first marriage with 
Etta Wilkins, of Wilton. His present wife, 
in maidenhood Millie E. Fay, is a daughter 
of Warren G. and Mary H. Fay. Mr. Fay, 
who was for many years the proprietor of the 
woollen-mills in East Brookfield, died here in 
1893. Mrs. Fay resides with her daughter, 
Mrs. Keith. In politics Mr. Keith is a Re- 
publican, and he has been a member of the 
Town Committee for a number of years. For 
three years he was an engineer of the fire de- 
partment, and for the past four years he has 
been a Justice of the Peace. He is connected 
with Goodwill Lodge, I. O. O. F., of Spen- 
cer; and with the Knights of Pythias of that 
town, in which he is Colonel of the First 
Massachusetts Regiment, Uniformed Rank. 
He is also a member of the Republican Club 
of Boston. His business enterprise has been 
of much benefit to the town. The loyal inter- 
est he displays in all matters relative to the 
town's welfare is duly appreciated by the com- 
munity. 



M 



AVID BEMIS, a well-known and 
highly respected resident of Leices- 
ter, who was a member of the 
Leicester Wire Company for a num- 
ber of years, was born in the town of Spencer, 
this county, November 25, 1832. A son of 
John and Lucretia (Brown) Bemis, his pater- 
nal ancestors were among the pioneers of 
Spencer. John Bemis, son of David, was 
born in that town. While he was a carpenter 
by trade, the latter years of his life were spent 
on a farm, where he died in 1853. Lucretia 
Brown, whom he married, was a native of 
Paxton, Mass. 

David Bemis, his grandfather's namesake, 
grew to manhood on the homestead farm, 
near Upper Wire Village, Spencer, receiving 
a fair knowledge of the common branches of 
study in the district school of his neighbor- 
hood. Shortly after reaching his majority 
he lost his father by death. He then entered 
the employ of Richard Sugden, in the wire- 



mill at Wire Village. Not long after he came 
to Leicester to work for Charles Sibley, a 
manufacturer of hand cards ; and a little later 
he became an employee of J. & J. Murdock, 
manufacturers of card clothing, with whom he 
remained eight years. Following this for five 
years he was with Woodcock & Knight in the 
same line of business and subsequently for a 
time with the Sargent Card Clothing Com- 
pany, of Worcester. Returning then to 
Leicester, he worked for several years in the 
employment of Horace Waite & Co., who were 
also manufacturers of card clothing. After 
this he and Cyrus Howard, in the firm of 
Howard & Bemis, took up the manufacture of 
wire in Leicester. Some years later the com- 
pany was merged into the Leicester Wire 
Company, with which Mr. Bemis was identi- 
fied for several years. Afterward for a time 
he was in the employ of J. & L. Woodcock, 
card clothing manufacturers of Leicester. 

In 1S60 Mr. Bemis was united in marriage 
with Abbie B. Johnson, of Worcester. Of 
the three children born to them, none are now 
living. The confidence reposed in Mr. Bemis 
by his townsmen is shown by his election as 
Water Commissioner of Leicester in 1891, 
in which capacity he served four years in suc- 
cession. For a number of years past he has 
been a trustee of the Leicester Savings Bank. 
In politics he is a Republican. He is a 
member of the First Congregational Church 
of Leicester, in which he holds the position 
of treasurer. 



7^\HARLES VICTOR CARPENTER, 
I V-' one of the leading merchants of 
^Hg Southbridge, son of Dr. Patrick 

Carpenter, was born April 2, 1830, 
in Eastford, Windham County, Conn. Of 
English origin, he is a descendant of one of 
the early families that settled Milford, Mass. 
His paternal grandfather, Uriah Carpenter, 
was a lifelong resident of Ashford, Conn., 
where he was successfully engaged in farm- 
ing. Patrick Carpenter was born in the part 
of Ashford, Conn., now included in Eastford. 
After a thorough course of study he was grad- 
uated from Williams College with the degree 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



191 



of Doctor of Medicine. Having begun prac- 
tice in Eastford, he afterward followed his 
profession there until his death, which oc- 
curred in May, 1834. He married Esther 
Burnham, who belonged to an old and well- 
known New England family. They reared 
two children, namely: Patrick Henry, who 
died April 16, 1893; and Charles V., the 
subject of this biography. 

Charles Victor Carpenter passed his boy- 
hood in his native town, receiving his educa- 
tion in the local schools. In 1848 he came 
to Southbridge, and found employment with 
Oliver Ammidown, who then had a store in 
the Comstock Building. He subsequently 
worked for Captain Luther Ammidown & 
Sons, whose store was located on the site of 
the present library building. In 1852 he 
went to Worcester, Mass., as a clerk for the 
firm of Chamberlain, Barnard & Co., now the 
Barnard, Sumner & Putnam Company. There 
he had as associate clerks the late George 
Sumner and Otis Putnam of the present 
house. In 1859 ne returned to Southbridge, 
and entered the employment of John Edwards. 
Two years later he and Mr. Edwards united 
in the firm Edwards & Co., and thereafter 
conducted an extensive dry-goods business 
until 1872, when the senior partner retired. 
The firm was succeeded by that of Carpenter, 
Irwin & Co., of which Stephen P. Irwin, Jr., 
a former clerk, who was thoroughly familiar 
with the business, was a member. This part- 
nership lasted until 1880, when Mr. Carpenter 
opened a store of his own in the Whitford 
Building, at the corner of Main and Hamil- 
ton Streets. Later he formed a copartner- 
ship with Calvin D. Paige, and for a time 
carried on business in the Edwards Opera 
House Block. The firm was subsequently 
changed to Paige, Carpenter, Colburn & Co., 
and is now the Paige, Carpenter Company. 
The corporation's store is the largest one that 
is entirely devoted to dry goods in the south- 
ern part of Worcester County: 

In 1873 Mr. Carpenter was a Representa- 
tive to the State legislature, where he served 
on the Committee on Prisons. He is a trus- 
tee of the Southbridge Savings Bank and a 
stockholder of the Southbridge & Sturbridge 



Street Railway Company, of the local gas 
company, and of the Southbridge Electric 
Light Company. An active and prominent 
Mason, he belongs to Quinnebaug Lodge and 
to Phcenix Council, of which he is Past Re- 
gent and Past District Deputy. In the South 
Congregational Church he is a Deacon, hav- 
ing served the society in many of its commit- 
tees, including the one that had charge of the 
erection of the present church edifice. The 
first of his two marriages was contracted in 
1854 with Lucy M. Haynes, who was a daugh- 
ter of Deacon Henry Haynes, of Sturbridge, 
and who died in 1856. The second marriage 
was made on June 8, 1858, with Sarah J., 
daughter of Stephen P. and Sally R. (Rem- 
ington) Irwin. Of the children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Carpenter, two are now living, 
namely: Cora L., the wife of F. W. Boulton, 
of Spencer, Mass.; and Josephine I., the 
wife of C. H. Edmunds, of Southbridge. 



James 
Blair, 



JOSEPH BLAIR, one of the most enter- 
prising and prosperous agriculturists of 
Warren, was born in this town, Sep- 
tember 19, 1838. A son of Captain 
Blair, he is a grandson of James 
who was the founder of the Blair 
family in Worcester County. Captain Blair, 
who spent his eighty-three years of life in 
Warren, was prominent alike in business, 
military, and political affairs. For many 
years he commanded a company of local mili- 
tia, was an Overseer of the Poor for a number 
of terms, and during the larger part of his life 
he was a member of the Congregational 
church. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Anna M. Hutchins, was born and bred in 
Killingly, Conn. Of their children, three 
survive, as follows: Mary A., the widow of 
A. W. Lincoln, late of Warren; Henrietta 
V., the wife of Theodore Bishop, of Verona, 
N.Y. ; and Joseph, the subject of this biog- 
raphy. 

Joseph Blair received his early education 
in the common schools of Warren, finishing 
in the high school. Trained to agriculture 
from his youthful days, he has since followed 
the same occupation. He is now the owner 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of a valuable farm of one hundred and fifty- 
five acres, on which he raises abundant crops 
and live stock, and keeps a dairy, having some 
fine specimens of cattle. A strong Republi- 
can in politics, he is actively interested in ad- 
vancing the educational and moral interests of 
the community. Under a former school sys- 
tem he served as director of his school dis- 
trict. 

On January 30, 1862, Mr. Blair married 
Miss Anna M. Dale, who was born in Salem, 
Mass., a daughter of Joseph Dale. Of their 
three children, Joseph A. and Mary are de- 
ceased. Their only living child, James R., 
is a chemist in Boston. 



OSEPH BUBIER BANCROFT, one of 
the foremost citizens of Hopedale, for 
many years connected with the Hope- 
dale Machine Company, which is now 
incorporated with the Draper Company, was 
born in Uxbridge, Mass., October 3, 1821, 
one of the ten children of Samuel and Mary 
(Bubier) Bancroft. He is a descendant in the 
eighth generation of John and Jane Bancroft, 
who came to America from London in 1632, 
settling in Lynn. From John Bancroft' the 
line of descent is traced through Thomas, 2 
Thomas, 3 Samuel, 4 Samuel, 5 Samuel, 6 Sam- 
uel, 7 to Joseph B. 8 

In early manhood Mr. Bancroft learned the 
trade of machinist, which he followed in 
Woonsocket, R.I., Putnam, Conn., and in 
Medway, Slatersville, Uxbridge, Whitins- 
ville, and Worcester, Mass. Coming to 
Hopedale in 1846, he joined the "Hopedale 
community," and was appointed superintend- 
ent and treasurer of the Hopedale Machine 
Works, which then employed but three men. 
This small force was gradually increased until 
the disbandment of the community, whereupon 
the business passed into the control of Messrs. 
Thwing and Bancroft. Subsequently Mr. 
Bancroft, becoming a partner with Eben and 
George Draper, took charge of the cotton ma- 
chinery department, this connection lasting 
for some years. Shortly after the Civil War, 
when General William F. Draper became a 
member of the firm, Mr. Bancroft became gen- 



eral superintendent of the works, which posi- 
tion he filled until recently. He is now 
vice-president of the Draper Company. Mr. 
Bancroft is interested in various other busi- 
ness enterprises, among them the Milford Gas 
Light Company, of which he is president. 
As a useful and public-spirited citizen he has 
been deservedly honored with responsible 
official positions. In 1864 he represented the 
town in the General Court, and served on the 
Committee, on Engrossed Bills. For several 
years he was chairman of the Selectmen of the 
town of Milford, of which town Hopedale was 
then a part. After the division of the towns 
in 1886, he was chairman of the Selectmen, of 
the Road Commissioners, and of the Over- 
seers of the Poor. He has also been delegate 
to numerous Republican conventions, besides 
serving on various town committees. In 
earlier life he was active in Masonry, and he 
is now a member of Montgomery Lodge, F. & 
A. M.; Mount Lebanon Chapter, R. A. M. ; 
and of Milford Commandery, K. T. 

Mr. Bancroft was married September 11, 
1844, to Sylvia Willard Thwing, who was 
born in Uxbridge, June 26, 1824, a daughter 
of Benjamin and Anna (Mowry) Thwing. He 
has had ten children — Eben Draper, Charles 
Eugene, Minerva Louisa, William, Walter, 
Anna Minerva, Mary Gertrude, Charles Fred- 
erick, Lilla J., and Lura Belle. Minerva L., 
William, and Walter, who were triplets, died 
in infancy. Charles Eugene died on March 
27, 1849. Anna M., who taught for some 
years successfully in the Fairhaven, Hopkin- 
ton, and Milford High Schools, is a lady of 
cultivated literary taste, and belongs to sev- 
eral educational clubs in Milford, Worcester, 
and Boston. Mary G. married Walter P. 
Winsor, of Fairhaven, Mass., cashier of the 
First National Bank in New Bedford and one 
of the most prominent and influential citizens 
of Fairhaven. She has four children — Wal- 
ter P., Jr., Anna Bancroft, Bancroft, and 
Allen Pellington. Charles Frederick Ban- 
croft died September 14, 1868. Lilla J. mar- 
ried Howard W. Bracken, head draughtsman 
of the Draper Company. She was educated 
at Greenfield Academy, and taught in the high 
school at Hopedale for some years before her 




JOSEPH B. BANCROFT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



■95 



marriage. Lura Belle is the wife of Charles 
M. Day, who is general superintendent of the 
Draper Company, secretary of the town Board 
of Streets and Highways, and one of Hope- 
dale's most popular citizens. Mrs. Bancroft 
died April 20, 1898; and Mr. Bancroft is now 
erecting a very handsome memorial library, 
which, upon its completion, will be presented 
to the town of Hopedale. 



: EN DRAPER BANCROFT, the eld- 
est child and now the only living son 
of Joseph B. and Sylvia W. 
(Thwing) Bancroft, was born in Hopedale, 
Mass., August 27, 1847. He received his 
education in Hopedale, Milford, and at a pri- 
vate school in Providence, R.I., where he 
took a course in civil engineering. Return- 
ing to Hopedale in October, 1864, he assumed 
charge of the accounts in the office of what 
was then the E. D. & G. Draper Company, a 
few years later becoming the purchasing agent 
of the firm, which position he still holds. He 
also has general charge of the offices of the 
Draper' Company. One of the most capable 
and thoroughly posted men in the business, his 
efficient services are appreciated at their true 
value by the management. He is also treas- 
urer of the Glasgo Yarn Mills Company, of 
Glasgo, Conn., and of the Glasgo Thread Mill, 
of Worcester, Mass., a director in the Mil- 
ford Water Company, and has been treasurer 
of the town of Hopedale since its incorpora- 
tion in 1886. He also for a short period man- 
aged the American Architect, which is now 
conducted by the Messrs. Ware. He is treas- 
urer of the Unitarian parish in Hopedale. 
Mr. Bancroft is active in politics, and perhaps 
few men in the State wield a more potent 
local influence than he. He has taken part 
in Republican conventions since he was 
twenty-one years old. He was also manager 
of the two successful campaigns of his noted 
kinsman, General William F. Draper, now 
United States Ambassador and Minister Plen- 
ipotentiary to Italy, in his candidature for the 
United States Congress. He is a member of 
the three local organizations of Free Masons, 
was for two years Commander of Milford Com- 



mandery, K. T., and is therefore a member of 
the Grand Commandery. 

On September 9, 1874, Mr. Bancroft was 
united in marriage with Lelia Coburn, who 
was born September 14, 1846, a daughter of 
Alonzo and Eliza (Curtis) Jones Coburn. 
He has two children: Alice Coburn, born 
July 3, 1876; and Joseph Bubier, born Febru- 
ary 26, 1880, who is now fitting for Harvard 
College in a private school in New York. 



rBERT E. CUMMINGS, of North 
kookfield, a general merchant and 
the proprietor of the North Brook- 
field Creamery, was born April 11, 
1852, in Leverett, Franklin County, Mass. 
A son of Charles Cummings, he comes of 
English origin and of Revolutionary stock. 
His great-grandfather, Gashon Cummings, 
fought for independence in the Revolution. 
The father, born and reared in Spencer, 
Mass., subsequently resided in different Mas- 
sachusetts towns, and died February 21, 1895, 
in North Brookfield. His wife, in maiden- 
hood Eliza Wadsworth, born in Woodstock, 
Conn., was a grand-daughter of a Revolution- 
ary soldier and a direct descendant of Chris- 
topher Wadsworth, who was one of the orig- 
inal settlers of Duxbury, Mass., and is said to 
have come from England in the "Mayflower." 
The Wadsworth coat of arms is a handsomely 
ornamented shield, surmounted by a winged 
globe, on which stands an eagle with wings 
outspread, with the motto, "Aquila non capit 
Muscas," on a scroll beneath the shield. 

Having been taken to Spencer by his par- 
ents when he was four years old, Herbert E. 
Cummings was practically educated in that 
town. At the age of fifteen he went with the 
family to New Braintree, Worcester County, 
and three years later he came to North Brook- 
field. Here he was first employed on a farm 
for a few years. This occupation he gave up 
to become a clerk in the general store of Dun- 
can & Delvey, for whom he worked seven 
years. In 1880 he and Sumner Holmes, in 
the firm Holmes & Cummings, started a mer- 
cantile business, and subsequently conducted 
it for two years. Then the partnership was 



196 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



dissolved, and Mr. Cummings has since been 
the sole proprietor of the store. He carries 
a complete stock of dry goods, boots and 
shoes, groceries, flour, and provisions of all 
kinds, including creamery butter, of which he 
makes a specialty, it being the product of the 
North Brookfield Creamery, which he has 
owned since 1893. Fraternally, he belongs 
to the North Brookfield Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; 
and to the local grange, P. of H., in which he 
has served as Overseer. 

On November 15, 1876, Mr. Cummings 
married Frances A., daughter of George Har- 
wood, whose death occurred at his late home 
in North Brookfield, March 5, 1897. Mr. 
Harwood was a prominent agriculturist of 
North Brookfield, served in many of the town 
offices, and for several years was a trustee of 
the local savings-bank. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Cummings are members of the First Congre- 
gational Church. 



T^NOBERT A. BECKWITH, Postmas- 
I <ff ter of Southbridge, was born on 
J_b\ Fisher's Island, N.Y., June 26, 
^""^ 1865, son of Wilson and Eunice 
(Beebe) Beckwith. Both the Beckwiths and 
Beebes are old Connecticut families. The 
latter are directly descended from Governor 
Winthrop. Wilson Beckwith, born in Ches- 
ter, Conn., in 181 2, spent the active period of 
his life engaged in agriculture. He is now 
residing in Monson, Mass. By his first wife, 
whose maiden name was Tiffany, there were 
two sons — Henry and Samuel. Samuel 
Beckwith served for one year and three months 
in the Civil War as a member of Company E, 
Twenty-second Regiment, Connecticut Volun- 
teers, and died immediately after his return. 
Eunice Beebe Beckwith, Wilson Beckwith's 
second wife, a daughter of Manley Beebe, of 
Millington, Conn., became the mother of 
seven children. Of these, our are living, 
namely: Belle, who married Leonard Rath- 
bun, and resides in Monson; John F., an en- 
gineer at the Flint Granite Works in that 
town; Robert A., the subject of this sketch; 
and Pearl, the wife of Charles C. Keep, also 
"f Monson. The mother died in 1880. 



Robert A. Beckwith was educated in the 
public schools of Monson, Mass. After the 
completion of his studies he worked for one 
summer as a farm assistant. Coming to 
Southbridge in 1881, he entered the employ 
of the American Optical Company. With the 
exception of one year spent as a clerk in the 
clothing store of J. A. White & Co., of this 
town, he remained with the Optical Company 
sixteen years. Beginning with fifty cents per 
day, he in the course of time reached a posi- 
tion commanding a good salary. After spend- 
ing three years in the gold room, he was trans- 
ferred to the steel department as assistant 
foreman. 

For a number of years Mr. Beckwith has 
been closely identified with local politics, 
having served as the secretary of the Republi- 
can Town Committee; and he was appointed 
Postmaster by President McKinley in 1897. 
On October 22, 1890, he married Lizzie E. 
Chamberlain, a daughter of Freeman and Mary 
A. (Marcy) Chamberlain, of Southbridge. 
Mrs. Beckwith is the mother of one daughter, 
Eunice May, who was born in May, 1895. 
Mr. Beckwith is Past Grand of Southbridge 
Lodge, No. 47, I. O. O. F. ; Past Chancellor 
of Armor Lodge, No. 8j, K. of P. ; and a 
member of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation. Some years ago he united with the 
Central Baptist Church, which he serves in 
the capacity of assistant superintendent of its 
Sunday-school. 




UMNER HOLMES, a prosperous 
merchant of North Brookfield and 
a veteran of the Civil War, was 
born in this town, December 27, 
1833, son of Hartwell and Amanda (Stoddard) 
Holmes. He comes of the same stock as the 
late Oliver Wendell Holmes. His grand- 
father, Hartwell Holmes (first), was a native 
of Connecticut. The father, born in Wood- 
stock, Conn., came to North Brookfield about 
the year 1820, and here followed the shoe- 
maker's trade in connection with farming for 
the rest of his life. Amanda Stoddard 
Holmes, his wife, was a native of this town. 
After leaving the public schools Sumner 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



197 



Holmes engaged in shoemaking, and followed 
it until 1862. Then he enlisted as a private 
in Company F, Forty-second Regiment, Mas- 
sachusetts Volunteer Infantry, for nine 
months. Soon after he was promoted to the 
rank of Third Sergeant, and he served for one 
year under General Banks on the Lower Mis- 
sissippi. Having been honorably discharged 
in 1863, he returned home, and immediately 
became the foreman in the bottoming depart- 
ment of E. & A. H. Batcheller's shoe fac- 
tory, having charge of an average force of four 
hundred and fifty men. This position he held 
until the fall of 1880, when he resigned. In 
1 88 1 he formed a partnership with H. E. 
Cummings, under the firm name of Holmes & 
Cummings, for the purpose of engaging in a 
general merchandise business. After two 
years Mr. Holmes became the sole proprietor 
of the store, and conducted it until 1891, 
when he adopted his present line of trade. 
He now carries a large stock of hardware, cut- 
lery, farming tools, paints, oils, wall papers, 
mouldings, etc. His business has already 
reached large proportions, and his popularity 
is sufficient to insure his future prosperity. 

In politics Mr. Holmes is a Republican, 
and he was formerly a member of the Repub- 
lican Town Committee. He has served as 
Constable and Overseer of the Poor; was Se- 
lectman for a number of years, being the 
chairman of the board during the greater part 
of the time; and he was once a candidate for 
the legislature from the old Eighteenth Dis- 
trict. For some years he was the chief en- 
gineer of the fire department, and the Holmes 
Engine Company was named in his honor. 
At present he is a Justice of the Peace. By 
his marriage with Mercy P. Eaton, of John- 
son, Vt., he has had three children, namely: 
Olive A., now the wife of James E. Miller, 
of Warren, Mass. ; Julia L., the wife of Will- 
iam B. Gleason, of North Brookfield; and 
Charles S. Holmes, who is no longer living. 

Mr. Holmes was formerly Worshipful Mas- 
ter of Hayden Lodge, F. & A. M., of Brook- 
field, from which he was demitted in order to 
become a charter member of Meridian Sun 
Lodge, North Brookfield, of which he is a 
Past Master. He is also a comrade of Ezra 



Batcheller Post, No. 51, G. A. R. In relig- 
ious belief he is a Congregationalist, and he 
attends the Union church. 



KREDERICK S. HUNT, of Rutland, a 
manufacturer of patent ironclad veneer 
baskets, roving cans, and lumber, and 
a dealer in hard and soft wood, was born in 
Worcester, Mass., on June 7, 1855, son of 
Frederick S. and Amy (Stockweather) Hunt. 
His father, a native of Bolton Corner, was a 
peddler of Yankee notions in early life. 
Later associated with M. E. Shattuck, he be- 
came a manufacturer of cigars in the firm of 
Shattuck & Hunt. He died in 1864. His 
wife, who was born in Mansfield, Conn., is 
still living in Rutland. Their children were: 
Amy E., Alice S., Frederick S., William J., 
and George E. 

Frederick S. Hunt, the subject of this 
sketch, grew to manhood in Rutland, receiv- 
ing his education in the public schools here 
and at Worcester. He first began to earn his 
own living by working at farming. When 
twenty-one years of age he engaged in the 
lumber business. He now owns a portable 
mill, and manufactures both long and short 
lumber. In 1892, at West Rutland, he 
started in a small way the making of veneer 
cans and roving baskets for use in cotton- 
mills. To-day, so far as is known, his fac- 
tory is the only one of the kind in the world. 
Owing to the increase of his business he 
erected his present premises in 1895. The 
machinery used is made expressly for this kind 
of work, and much of it has been invented by 
Mr. Hunt. The business, which is in a flour- 
ishing condition, is steadily increasing in its 
scope, and employs eighteen workmen the 
year around. Mr. Hunt expects soon to be 
able to manufacture entirely from raw mate- 
rial. He devotes his full attention to busi- 
ness, and all details come under his super- 
vision. 

At the age of twenty-seven years Mr. Hunt 
was united in marriage with Abbie G. Wales, 
who was born in Rutland, daughter of Ivory 
and Rebecca (Sargent) Wales. Of this union 
seven children have been born; namely, 



198 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Frederick S., Edson I., Gertrude, Waldo, 
Bertha, Bernice, and Harold. Mr. Hunt and 
his wife are members of the Congregational 
church. In politics Mr. Hunt is a Republi- 
can. He has served the town as Assessor for 
a period of eight years. 



OSEPH SAUER, a Civil War veteran, 
proprietor of the German-American 
Hotel, Worcester, Mass., was born in 
Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, January 
29, 1839. His father, Wendel Sauer, entered 
the French army as a substitute prior to 18 12, 
and afterward followed the trade of a shoe- 
maker. He reared a family of six children, 
two of whom are living, namely: Jacob, aged 
seventy-six years, who resides in Germany; 
and Joseph, the subject of this sketch, who is 
the youngest, and is the only one that came to 
America. The father died at the age of sixty- 
one years, and the mother at fifty-one. 

Joseph Sauer was educated in the common 
schools. When fifteen years old he came to 
the United States, landing at New York after 
a passage of thirty-two days. He was for 
some time employed in a woollen-mill at 
Broad Brook, Conn. ; and, coming to Worces- 
ter in 1859, he found work in the Allen 
& Wheelock pistol factory. He afterward 
worked in the Crompton loom shops and still 
later in the carbine factory of the Ballards, 
with whom he remained until they moved their 
business to Newburyport. During the Rebel- 
lion he enlisted as a musician in the Fifteenth 
Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteers, with 
which he served one year ; and in connection 
with his regular duty in the band he nursed 
the sick and wounded in the hospitals. In 
1865 he established a German restaurant on 
Front Street, and he has ever since carried on 
a thriving business. Twenty-three years ago 
he built the present German-American Hotel, 
a four-story brick building, the cafe and din- 
ing-room being located on the ground floor, 
while the three other floors are divided into 
thirty -four well - ventilated sleeping - rooms. 
This hostelry enjoys a liberal patronage. Mr. 
Sauer is one of the best as well as the most 
experienced German restam'ateurs in the city, 



and through energy and an earnest desire to 
please his patrons has acquired a competency. 
On August 13, 1864, Mr. Sauer was joined 
in marriage with Caroline Meyer, who was 
born in Wittenberg, Germany, April 25, 
1 841, and came to America with her parents 
when seven years old. She has one sister 
living. Her father, Francis Meyer, died at 
the age of sixty-five, and her mother lived to 
be seventy-five years old. Mrs. Sauer has 
had five children, the eldest of whom, a 
daughter, died when twenty-one months old; 
and a son also died in infancy. The living 
are: Carrie, wife of Julius Ehlers, of Hart- 
ford, Conn., and mother of two sons; Minnie, 
wife of Herman Klingle, of this city; and 
Emil, who is a pupil at the high school. 



7TALARENCE H. PARKER, a prosper- 
I \S ous merchant of Coldbrook Springs, in 
^^ls the town of Oakham, and an ex- 

member of the legislature, was born 
in this town, October 31, 1849, son °f Daniel 
M. and Mary A. (Brigham) Parker. His 
grandparents, Moody and Milicent (Moulton) 
Parker, were natives of Lyman, N.H., of 
which the parents of each were pioneers. 
Daniel M. Parker, born in Lyman, November 
3, 1 8 17, has carried on an extensive lumber 
manufacturing business in Oakham for many 
years. His wife, Mary A. Brigham Parker, 
was born in Rutland, Mass., June 12, 1829. 
(For a more extended account of the family 
see the biography of Daniel M. Parker.) 

After acquiring a good public-school edu- 
cation in his native town, Clarence H. Parker 
joined with his father in carrying on the 
mills, a connection that lasted until 1882. 
Then he withdrew in order to engage in trade. 
He now conducts the largest general store in 
this locality. He is also interested with his 
son in manufacturing Parker's Pure Flavoring 
Extracts and an excellent cough remedy 
known as "Pinelene." In October, 1871, he 
was united in marriage with Ida M. Bemis, of 
this town, daughter of James C. and Mary B. 
(Washburn) Bemis. Mr. Bemis, who has 
been in the employment of the Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad Company since 1873, and is 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



199 



now its agent at Coldbrook Springs, was born 
in Paxton, Mass., February 18, 1824. His 
wife was born in Gill, Mass., December 3, 
1825. Mrs. Parker is the mother of one son, 
Harry B. Parker, who, born May 21, 1873, is 
now associated with his father in business, 
and is the Postmaster of the town. 

Mr. Parker has been a member of the Board 
of Selectmen since 1883, and for the past ten 
years has been the chairman of that body. 
Since 1882 he has been Constable, was the 
Postmaster for a number of years, and he ably 
represented his district^ in the legislature in 
1896. Both he and Mrs. Parker attend the 
Unitarian church. 



'OHN D. PUTNAM, a manufacturer of 
building materials in Webster, was 
born in Charlton, Mass., May 31, 
1840. A son of Russell and Adeline 
(Buss) Putnam, he belongs to the sixth gen- 
eration descended from Nathaniel Putnam, 
who came with his father, John Putnam, 
from Aston-Abbots, England, and settled in 
Salem, Mass., about the year 1634. General 
Israel Putnam, of Revolutionary fame, came 
of the same stock. 

Russell Putnam, who was born in Sutton, 
Mass., in 1803, followed shoemaking in con- 
nection with farming. His wife, Adeline, 
who was a native of Holden, Mass., became 
the mother of nine children, namely: Russell, 
who resides in Webster; Lucian, who lives in 
Charlton; Silas, of Rockville, Conn.; Leon- 
ard, who died in 1882; Henry, a resident of 
Charlton; John D., the subject of this sketch; 
Hannah, who married Jackson Phelps, and re- 
sides in Auburn, Mass. ; Mary, the wife of 
Charles Lamb; and Sarah, the wife of Baxter 
Davis, both of whom are residents of Charlton. 
John D. Putnam acquired his education in 
his native town. He remained at home, as- 
sisting his father upon the farm, until he was 
twenty-one years old. Then he went to Rock- 
ville, Conn., where he learned the mill- 
wright's trade with his brother Silas. After 
residing for four years there, he returned to 
Charlton. Coming to Webster in the same 
year, he engaged in wood-turning, stair-build- 



ing, and kindred work. Some five years later 
he bought Palmer & Kent's sash and blind 
factory. Having combined the two indus- 
tries, he had carried on a thriving business for 
two years when his entire plant was destroyed 
by fire. Starting again immediately after the 
disaster, he has since been engaged in the 
manufacture of boxes, builders' finish, etc., 
which he ships to Providence, Hartford, and 
other industrial centres. At his present fac- 
tory on Chase Avenue he now employs an 
average of twenty-five men the year round. 

In April, 1865, Mr. Putnam married Sarah 
F. Johnson, a daughter of Veranes and Sarah 
(Wallace) Johnson. Mrs. Putnam is the 
mother of two children: Henry, born January 
15, 1868: and Fred W., born June 28, 1877. 
Henry, who is in business with his father, 
married Annie, a daughter of Charles R. 
Stobbs, of this town. Fred W. is now attend- 
ing the Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 
In politics Mr. Putnam, Sr., supports the Re- 
publican party. He is a leading member of 
the Universalist church, and has served upon 
the Parish Committee. 



/pTTo 



EORGE S. DUELL, formerly a lead- 
\ '*> I ing citizen of Brookfield, was born 
^-^~ in Enosburg, Vt., in June, 18 17, son 
of Paul and Mary (Stebbins) Duell. His ed- 
ucation was acquired in the schools of his na- 
tive town at a time when public-school in- 
struction was confined to the simplest branches 
of knowledge; but, being naturally bright and 
ambitious, he made up for his limited oppor- 
tunities by increased personal effort, and 
eventually became a well-educated man. At 
about the age of twenty he located in Spencer, 
Mass., where for several years he was em- 
ployed in a shoe factory. Subsequently he 
followed the same business in West Brook- 
field and later in Brookfield village, where 
he resided for the rest of his life. While a 
resident of West Brookfield he served as Dep- 
uty Sheriff. He was appointed Constable in 
Brookfield, and afterward received the ap- 
pointment of Trial Justice, an office which he 
filled most acceptably and impartially for a 
period of twenty years. Taking a keen inter- 



200 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



est in the general welfare of the community, 
he was actively concerned in various move- 
ments for advancing the growth and prosper- 
ity of the town. In politics he was a Repub- 
lican. He was a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, and in his younger days belonged to 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His 
death took place November 15, 1891. His 
first wife was before marriage Elizabeth Hal- 
lowell, of Spencer. By her he had a daugh- 
ter, Mary E., who is now the wife of Edwin 
Wilbur, of West Brookfield. For his second 
wife Mr. Duell married Mehitable L. Ludden, 
daughter of Daniel and Mary (Cowen) Lud- 
den. Her parents, who were for many years 
residents of Spencer, are no longer living. 
Mrs. Duell still resides in Brookfield, and oc- 
cupies a prominent position in social circles. 



fSAAC BOURN, the senior member of the 
firm Bourn, Hadley & Co., furniture 
manufacturers of Templeton, was born 
in Broome County, Canada, November 
24, 1821, son of Nathan and Clarissa (Pike) 
Bourn. The father, a native of Vermont, who 
spent a part of his active life upon a farm in 
Canada, at a later date moved to Northern New 
York. His last days were passed in Temple- 
ton, where he died at the age of eighty-seven 
years. In politics he was a Democrat. Cla- 
rissa, his wife, who was a native of Hampshire 
County, Massachusetts, was a daughter of 
John Pike, a Revolutionary soldier, who mi- 
grated from New England to Canada, where he 
followed agriculture for the rest of his life, 
and died at an advanced age. Of Nathan 
Bourn's fourteen children, all of whom grew to 
maturity, four sons and four daughters are 
now living. The mother died at the age of 
sixty-nine. Both parents were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Isaac Bourn attended a Canadian district 
school, which was held in a log house in the 
neighborhood of his father's farm. When 
twenty-three years old he came to the States. 
Settling at Templeton in 1844, he engaged in 
lumbering, and was in partnership with John 
Brooks for about thirty years. In 1865 he 
built a saw-mill, which he operated until 



1890. Then he erected the present factory, 
and established the firm of Bourn, Hadley & 
Co., comprising himself, Lucien N. Had- 
ley, and George W. Bourn. Employing from 
fifty to sixty men throughout the year, and 
taking the lumber from the stump, the firm 
manufactures pine, birch, and ash furniture of 
an excellent quality, with improved machinery 
run by steam-power. The enterprise is the 
leading industry of its kind in the town. Be- 
sides his interest in the factory, the senior 
partner owns some twelve hundred acres of 
timber land in this section. 

Mr. Bourn has been four times married, and 
has nine children living. Those of his first 
union are: Nettie B., who is now Mrs. Had- 
ley; Sarah B. , who is now Mrs. Howe; and 
George W. Bourn. The children of his sec- 
ond union are: Robert T. and Eudora. His 
third wife's children are: Willie E. and 
Ernest N. ; and those of his fourth are: Ed- 
ward I. and Clara E. Bourn. In politics he 
acts with the Republican party. He attends 
the Unitarian church. While giving his per- 
sonal attention to every detail of the firm's 
business, making daily visits to the different 
departments, he is popular with the employees, 
many of whom have been upon the pay-roll for 
several years, and for whom he has always a 
pleasant greeting. 




AMUEL HYDE, a practical and 
experienced agriculturist of War- 
ren, son of Abijah Hyde, was born 
in Ware, Hampshire County, Au- 
gust 9, 1 82 1. He is a descendant of one of 
the earlier English settlers of New England. 
His father, born and brought up in Brookfield, 
removed to Ware, Mass., where he carried on 
mixed husbandry for some years. Afterward 
Abijah was similarly occupied in Palmer and 
Sturbridge, Mass., for some time. His last 
years were spent in Brookfield, where his 
death occurred in 1S63, at a good old age. 
He married Sally Moore, a daughter of Ash- 
bel Moore, who was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary War. Of their children, three are 
still living, as follows: Samuel, the subject 
of this biography; Alvin, a resident of Brook- 



-■- — ~ •• 




ISAAC BOURN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



203 



field; and Maria, the widow of Alonzo 
Upham, late of East Brookfield. 

Samuel Hyde obtained his education by 
attending school during the winter terms in 
Ware, Palmer, and Sturbridge. The larger 
part of his time in boyhood was employed in 
labor on the home farm, on which he lived 
until he reached man's estate. Soon after his 
marriage he purchased a tract of land in 
Brookfield, where he spent the ensuing quar- 
ter of a century engaged in general farming 
and brick-making. Having disposed of that 
property, he came to Warren in 1876, and he 
has since been successfully engaged in farm- 
ing here. His farm of two hundred acres, 
advantageously located, bears speaking evi- 
dence of the industry, skill, and thrift of the 
owner. Beginning the battle of life a poor 
boy, his sole capital being a courageous heart 
and two strong, willing hands, he toiled early 
and late to obtain a good living for him- 
self and family. Prosperity smiled upon his 
efforts, and each year's labor added a little to 
his former success, until he had acquired a 
comfortable property. In politics he affiliates 
with the Democratic party; and, as a loyal 
and true citizen, he is actively interested in 
advancing the welfare of the town and county 
in which he resides. 

On December 6, 1843, Mr. Hyde married 
Sarah A. Gay, who was born in Brookfield, 
Mass., daughter of Phineas and Mary (Chick- 
ering) Gay. His children are: Juliana, the 
wife of Joseph Brigham, of Brookfield ; and 
Henry S. , who lives on the home farm. 
Henry S. Hyde married Eva Carter, a native 
of Holland, Mass., and a daughter of the late 
William Carter; and he is the father of one 
son, Robert H. Both he and his wife are 
active members of the Brookfield grange, P. 
of H. His family, which includes his wife's 
mother, Mrs. Henrietta Converse Carter, re- 
side with his parents. 



/®Yc 



EORGE H. RICH, the proprietor of 

\ '•) I Wildwood Farm, Worcester, was 

born in North Brookfield, Mass., 

June 7, 1837, son of Elkanah and Loretta 

Maria (Hubbard) Rich. His grandfather, 



Apollos Rich, son of a sea captain, resided 
upon a farm in Ware, and reared three sons 
and one daughter. 

Elkanah Rich, born in Ware, Mass., about 
the year 1807, was reared to farm life. When 
a young man he learned the currier's trade, 
which, however, he did not follow for any 
length of time. In 1837 ne moved from 
North Brookfield to Worcester, settling upon 
the Newton farm, which was located in the 
neighborhood of the present Newton Square. 
He resided there until 1849, when he bought 
a farm of thirty-five acres in the village of 
Tatnuck, Worcester, where he was prosper- 
ously engaged in agriculture for the rest of 
his active period. At his death, which oc- 
curred February 25, 1875, he left consider- 
able property. His wife, Loretta Maria, a 
native of Barre, Mass., whom he married at 
New Braintree, Mass., in 1833, was a daugh- 
ter of Aden Hubbard, of Barre. Of their 
four children, the first-born, a daughter, died 
in infancy. The others are: George H., the 
subject of this sketch; Ellen, who married 
E. S. Everett, of Westboro, Mass. ; and 
Henry E. Rich, who occupies the old home- 
stead at Tatnuck. The mother died in 1881, 
aged sixty-eight years. Both parents were 
Congregationalists. 

George H. Rich was reared and educated in 
Worcester. With the exception of five years 
spent in a mechanical occupation, he has been 
engaged in farming since old enough to be 
useful. He was but eight years old when he 
began to work at market gardening. In 1872 
he purchased ten acres of new land located 
upon Moreland Heights. This property, now 
called Wildwood Farm, he brought to a high 
state of cultivation. He was one of the first 
in this city to engage exclusively in market 
gardening, and he was also the first to intro- 
duce a regularly equipped vegetable wagon. 

Mr. Rich contracted the first of his two 
marriages on March 14, 1859, with Martha C. 
Manley, of Brandon, Vt. She died in 1867, 
leaving two sons, namely: Frank E., of 
Amity, Mo. ; and George Edwin Rich, who 
resides in Worcester. Both sons are married, 
and George E. has one child. The father's 
second marriage in 1871 united him with 



204 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Harriet Anna Paddock, a daughter of Charles 
Paddock, of Holden, Mass. Born of this union 
was one daughter, Georgia A., who is now the 
wife of Adelbert Teague. Mr. and Mrs. Rich 
are now rearing an adopted daughter, Mildred 
H. Rich, whose present age is seven years. 
Politically, Mr. Rich is a Republican. He 
has never aspired to public office. Although 
not a church member, he is in sympathy with 
all good works, and contributes liberally 
toward the support of various religious 
societies. 



(s^YLPHA MORSE CHENEY, formerly 
IJjL a leading business man of South- 
/j(\ bridge, was born in this town, De- 
— cember 27, 1834. A son of Dea- 
con Marvin and Bertha (Morse) Cheney, he was 
a descendant of Sir John Cheney, a follower 
of the Duke of Gloucester, afterward Richard 
III., King of England. His immigrant an- 
cestor was an early settler in Roxbury, Mass. 
Deacon Marvin Cheney, who ranked as Colo- 
nel in the State militia, was widely and favor- 
ably known in this locality for his deep 
interest in the general welfare of the commu- 
nity and his earnest devotion to the cause of 
morality and religion. 

Alpha Morse Cheney acquired at home 
much valuable instruction, as his parents were 
intellectual and cultured people. After ac- 
quiring a knowledge of the ordinary branches 
in the public schools of his native town, he 
attended Nichols Academy in Dudley, Mass. 
When seventeen years old he entered the 
spectacle factory as an apprentice, and event- 
ually became a master of the trade. After 
remaining in the employ of R. H. Cole & Co. 
for a number of years, he acquired an interest 
in the business. When the American Optical 
Company was incorporated, he became one of 
the largest stockholders, and retained his in- 
terest in that enterprise for the rest of his 
life. His industry and unusually sound judg- 
ment in business matters produced ample 
financial reward, and his wealth was freely 
used for the benefit of public enterprises. 
For many years he was a Deacon of the Bap- 
tist church ; and he took a special interest in 



the Young Men's Christian Association, to 
the support of which he subscribed liberally. 

He died September 7, 1897, leaving a large 
amount of property, including one of the 
finest private residences in Southbridge. 

Mr. Cheney's first marriage was with Sarah 
Cunningham, who died in 1876. In 1882 he 
wedded Emma Bradford, of Woodstock, Conm 
She is a daughter of Stephen and Polly Brad- 
ford, and a descendant in the eighth genera- 
tion of the famous Governor Bradford. Her 
grandmother was Rebecca Marcy, whose two 
brothers participated in the Revolutionary 
War, and died from disease contracted while 
in the army. Mrs. Emma Cheney survives 
her husband, also one son and three daughters 
of his first wife. The latter are: Herman 
S. , a graduate of Amherst, class of 1894, and 
now interested in the American Optical Com- 
pany ; Hannah Beecher, who married Reuben 
F. Herron, and resides in Southbridge; 
Mabel, the wife of F. A. Wilber, of Foxboro; 
and Carrie N. , who married Herbert E. Wells, 
son of Hiram C. Wells, a large stockholder 
in the American Optical Company, and re- 
sides at Newton Highlands. The late Mr. 
Cheney was a member of Ouinebaug Lodge, 
F. & A. M. ; of Doric Chapter, Hiram Coun- 
cil; and Worcester Commandery of Knights 
Templar. He also belongs to Phoenix Coun- 
cil, No. 1, Royal Arcanum. 



Wi 



LLIAM D. MULLETT, a retired 
farmer of Brookfield, was born in 
New Braintree, Mass., January 15, 
1 82 1, son of George and Roxana (Makepeace) 
Mullett. His paternal great-grandfather was 
one of three brothers who, after arriving in 
this country, located in Worcester County. 
Abraham Mullett, the paternal grandfather, 
was an early settler in Oakham. George 
Mullett, the father, who was born in Oakham, 
enlisted as a drummer in the War of 1812, 
and did garrison duty in Boston. He learned 
the stone-mason's trade, and followed it in 
New Braintree for a number of years. After 
residing in Brookfield village for about three 
years, he removed to East Brookfield, where 
he spent the rest of his life. He was a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



205 



Deacon of the Baptist church. Roxana, his 
wife, who was a native of this State, became 
the mother of several children, four of whom 
are living, namely: Lorinda, the wife of 
Emerson Hastings, of Palmer, Mass. ; Will- 
iam D., the subject of this sketch; Sumner, 
a resident of North Brookfield ; and Fanny, 
now Mrs. L. Pellet, of North Brookfield. 

William D. Mullett was educated in the 
district schools of New Braintree and Brook- 
field. He was thirteen years old when his 
parents moved to this town. After leaving 
school he learned the stone-mason's trade. 
While yet a young man he worked at farm- 
ing in New York State for a time, and for 
over a year he was employed as an attendant 
at the Insane Asylum in Hartford, Conn. 
Then, purchasing a farm of seventy acres, he 
located within a short distance south of East 
Brookfield, and engaged in farming, and took 
work at his trade. By adding adjoining land 
from time to time, he now owns one hundred 
and ninety acres of excellent land, with good 
buildings and equipments. Since 1894 he has 
lived in retirement at Brookfield village. 

In 1843 Mr. Mullett first married Caroline 
Jones, who bore him four children, namely: 
Charles F. , now a resident of Brookfield; 
George H., now of Chicago, 111. ; Ella, who 
is the wife of W. E. Frye, of Worcester, 
Mass. ; and Albert, who is no longer living. 
His second marriage was contracted in 1866 
with Louisa M. Clark, of Barre, Mass., a 
daughter of Robert and Maria (Rice) Clark. 
In politics he is a Republican. He was a 
Highway Commissioner for a number of years 
and a member of the Board of Selectmen for 
one term. In these and other town offices Mr. 
Mullett displayed rare intelligence and sound 
judgment together with a determination to 
protect the general interests of the commu- 
nity. 



EEVI P. BRADISH, a retired machin- 
ist of Upton, was born where he now 
resides, September 1, 1823, son of 
Jotham and Deborah Bradish. He 
is of Scotch origin, and belongs to one of the 
most prominent families in Upton. His 



great-grandfather, James Bradish, who came 
here from Brighton, Mass., about the year 
1735 — the year in which the first church was 
organized — settled as a pioneer upon a part 
of the present Bradish homestead. James 
built his house upon the hill, a short distance 
from where it now stands, and resided there 
until his death, which occurred February 6, 
1800. He was a leading spirit in the affairs 
of the town, and took a prominent part in 
church matters. Elisha Bradish, one of the 
many children of James, succeeded to the 
homestead. By adding adjoining land from 
time to time, he made his farm one of the 
largest in the township. He moved the house 
to its present location, an undertaking which 
at that time required a force of seventy men, 
and took three days to accomplish. As Jus- 
tice of the Peace he transacted a great deal 
of civil business, and was one of the most able 
men of the town. In 1770 he married Hannah 
Taft, who had four children. 

Jotham Bradish, the father, who was in his 
younger days a schoolmaster, having become 
the owner of the homestead, carried on farm- 
ing successfully, giving special attention to 
dairying. He served as Selectman " and As- 
sessor for many years, acted as administrator 
of estates, and wrote numerous deeds and 
wills. Among the wills drawn by him was 
that of the Rev. Benjamin Wood, the third 
settled minister in Upton. His hospitable 
home was the scene of many family gather- 
ings, which frequently numbered forty or more 
relatives. He died at the age of sixty-five 
years. Deborah, his wife, became the mother 
of six children, namely: Philander, who died 
at the age of nineteen years; Harvey, who 
managed the home farm until his death, which 
occurred in 1890; Hannah, who still lives at 
the homestead; Nancy, who died at the age 
of twenty-eight years; Elisha, who has as- 
sisted in the cultivation of the farm since his 
youth and is unmarried; and Levi P., the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

Having previously attended the schools of 
his native town, Levi P. Bradish completed 
his education at the Wilbrabam Academy. 
He resided at home until about the year 1851, 
when he went to Milford. Here after some 



2o6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



time he became the foreman of a machine 
shop, and retained that position for thirty 
years. He then retired from active labor, and 
has since resided on the homestead. The first 
of his two marriages was contracted with 
Louisa Forbush, who died a few years after- 
ward. His second and present wife, who was 
before marriage Eliza W. Littlefield, has had 
nine children. Of these, seven attained ma- 
turity, namely: Ella, who married Thomas B. 
Keith, of Easton, Mass., and has had two 
children; Arthur, who married Nellie Burr, 
and died at the age of thirty-two years, leav- 
ing a widow and two daughters; Henry Will- 
ard, now a printer in Philadelphia; Alfred 
G., who married Jennie Taft, and resides in 
Upton; Esther Elizabeth, the wife of Milo P. 
Warren, of Hopkinton, Mass. ; Elbert A., 
now a travelling salesman, residing in Lynn, 
Mass. ; and Florence Estelle, who resides 
with her parents. While residing in Milford, 
Mr. Bradish was a Deacon of the Congrega- 
tional church for twenty-seven years and the 
musical director of the Sunday-school for 
nearly the same length of time. 




lHARLES DAWSON, of Holden, the 
founder, president, and treasurer of the 
Dawson Manufacturing Company, 
was born in Lancaster County, 
England, on April 9, 1832. His parents, 
Henry and Alice (Wolstenholme) Dawson, 
were natives of Lancaster County. The 
father, who was a gardener in England, came 
to America in 1845, and, locating in Millbury, 
Mass., was employed there in various occupa- 
tions. His last years were spent in Connecti- 
cut; and he died in Broad Brook, that State, at 
the age of sixty-nine years. He was Ortho- 
dox in religious belief, and led a life con- 
sistent therewith. Of his family of twelve 
children, nine are now living. 

Charles Dawson was quite a young boy 
when he came to America. Having previ- 
ously worked in a cotton-mill in England, he 
found employment in the mills at Millbury 
soon after his arrival. His educational oppor- 
tunities were limited to attendance at the 
Millbury district school for a short time. 



The greater part of his life since he was ten 
years of age has been spent in mill work. He 
had worked in various places up to 1866, 
when, starting in business for himself in 
Worcester, Mass., he dealt in mill supplies 
until 1871. He first came to Holden in 1870. 
In 1872 he established his present plant there. 
Manufacturing a high grade of woollen goods, 
he has since built up a prosperous business. 
Since 1896, when the firm was incorporated, 
Mr. Dawson has been the president and treas- 
urer, and his son, Charles A. Dawson, the 
vice-president and manager. At the begin- 
ning only twenty-five hands were employed. 
Now from sixty-five to seventy are kept con- 
stantly busy. The most cordial relations 
exist between the operatives and the manage- 
ment. Every department is supplied with the 
latest and most improved appliances. 

In 1852 Mr. Dawson was married to Jane 
E. Osborne. He now has three children — 
Alida A., Carrie E., and Charles A. Taking 
a constant interest in the affairs of the town, 
he has served in the offices of Assessor and 
Selectman. In politics he supports the Re- 
publican party. Liberal in his religious 
opinions, he does not accept the creed of any 
particular church organization. An esteemed 
Mason, he is a member of Athelstan Lodge, 
of Worcester. By great industry and energy 
he has worked his way up from the bottom of 
the ladder, and he can now look back with sat- 
isfaction upon his past career. Outside his as- 
sistants and operatives, he has a wide circle of 
other friends, who find his beautiful home in 
Holden, near Dawson station, a delightful 
place to visit- 



(9>TNDREW L - NOURSE, one of the most 
h\ extensive farmers of Bolton, a former 
yJ|A member of the State legislature, and 
^"""^ a Civil War veteran, was born in 
Marlboro, Mass., January 24, 1842, son of 
Luther and Elizabeth (Whitney) Nourse. 
His great-grandfather, Jonathan Nourse, who 
was an early settler in Bolton, died at the age 
of eighty-three years. The grandfather, also 
named Jonathan, was a lifelong resident of 
this town. Luther Nourse, the father of An- 




FRANCIS L. CHAPIN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



209 



drew L., was born and reared in Bolton. 
When a young man he settled upon a farm in 
Marlboro, where he resided several years. 
His last days were spent in his native town, 
where he died at the age of eighty-three years. 
His wife, Elizabeth, who was born in Har- 
vard, Mass., daughter of Jacob Whitney, be- 
came the mother of two children, of whom 
Andrew L. is the survivor. The mother died 
at the age of sixty-three years. Both parents 
attended the Unitarian church. 

Andrew L. Nourse, who has resided in 
Bolton since infancy, was educated in the 
common and high schools of this town. At 
the age of twenty years he enlisted as a 
private in Company I, Fifth Regiment, Mas- 
sachusetts Volunteers, with which he served 
nine months, participating in the battles of 
Kingston, Whitehall, Goldsboro, and Gum 
Swamp. After his return from the army he 
taught school for a time. He then bought 
a farm, which he sold a year later, and for the 
succeeding ten years was engaged in various 
business enterprises. In 1873 he purchased 
his present property of three hundred and 
eighty-five acres, from 
large quantity of wood, 
extensively engaged in 
dairying. 

In 1876 Mr. Nourse was united in mar- 
riage with Maria A. Newton, daughter of 
Horatio and Rebecca Newton. Her father 
was a prosperous farmer, who spent the greater 
part of his life in this town. Mr. and Mrs. 
Nourse are the parents of six children — 
Arthur H., Richard E., Fidelia E., Grace 
M., Ethel R., and Alice S., all of whom 
reside with them. 

Politically a Republican, Mr. Nourse has 
served efficiently in various town offices. For 
a number of years he has been chairman of 
the Board of Assessors and of the School 
Committee. He has been for several years 
a Selectman and a member of the Board of 
Health, has served as Road Commissioner 
and as a trustee of the Public Library, and in 
1892 he ably represented this district in the 
legislature. In all matters relating to agri- 
culture and its advancement he takes a lively 
interest. He was the first Master of Bolton 



which he has cut a 
and where he is now 
general farming and 



Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, and is now 
a trustee of the Worcester East Agricultural 
Society. He also affiliates with the war vet- 
erans, being a comrade of Post G. K. Warren, 
No. 172, G. A. R. He attends the Unitarian 
church, of which he is treasurer, and his fam- 
ily is connected with the Sunday-school. 



KRANCIS LUTHER CHAPIN, one of 
the most prominent business men and 
financiers of Southbridge, was born in 
Enfield, Hampshire County, Mass., April 27, 
1844, son of Luther and Hannah (Conkey) 
Chapin. He comes of old Colonial stock 
planted in Central Massachusetts more than 
two hundred years ago, being a representative 
of the family founded by Samuel Chapin, 
who, with his wife, Cicely, came to New 
England between 1635 anc l 1640, sojourned 
for a time at Roxbury, Mass., there became a 
freeman in 1641, and in 1642 removed to 
Springfield, in the Connecticut valley. 

From Deacon Samuel Chapin, the immi- 
grant progenitor, to and including Francis 
Luther, the subject of this sketch, the line of 
descent is as follows: Samuel, 1 Josiah, 2 Seth, 3 
Seth, Jr., 4 Josiah, 5 Stephen, 6 Luther, 7 Luther, s 
Francis Luther. 9 Josiah Chapin, son of Sam- 
uel, "inherited," it is said, "superior natural 
abilities, and added to them valuable acquire- 
ments for the practical business of life. He 
was an eminent land surveyor, apt in public 
affairs, and an enterprising pecuniary econo- 
mist." He was married three times, ancl was 
the father of fifteen children, all but the 
youngest of whom were born in Braintree, 
Mass. About 1682 he removed to Mendon, 
Worcester County. He lived to be ninety- 
two years of age. 

Seth Chapin, Jr., grandson of the first Jo- 
siah, born in 1692, son of Seth and Bethiah 
(Thurston) Chapin, married Abigail Adams, 
of Braintree, daughter of Joseph Adams and a 
half-sister of Deacon John Adams, father of 
the elder President Adams. Josiah Chapin, 
second, son of Seth, Jr., married and settled 
in Milford. Stephen, his eldest son by his 
wife, Rachel, born in 1745, married Rachel 
Rawson, lived in Milford, and had eight chil- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



dren. Of these, Luther Chapin, Sr., the fifth, 
born March 22, 1777, married March 5, 1796, 
Mary Wedge, daughter of Jephthah Wedge, 
of Milford, and settled in Pelham, Hampshire 
County, Mass., where he was engaged as a 
general trader for many years. 

Further particulars concerning this branch 
of the Chapin family may be found in the 
History of Milford, by the Rev. Adin Ballou, 
to which we are indebted for most of the fore- 
going genealogy. Among the numerous de- 
scendants of Deacon Samuel Chapin, of 
Springfield, many have distinguished them- 
selves in professional and in business life and 
in the military service of the country. One 
of the foremost pulpit orators for a long period 
in the middle of the century was the Rev. 
Edwin H. Chapin, D.D., pastor of the 
Church of the Divine Paternity, New York 
City. In Philadelphia, a few years since, 
died "a wonderful old man, the venerable 
William Chapin, perhaps the leading educator 
of the blind in the United States." He was 
for many years the principal of the Pennsyl- 
vania Institution for the Blind at Philadel- 
phia. For several years James Gillespie 
Blaine, then a young man, was employed by 
him as an instructor. Mr. Chapin continued 
in active service as principal till the winter 
before his death, at eighty years of age. 

Luther Chapin, Jr., the father of Francis 
Luther, was born in Pelham in 1805. He 
carried on general mercantile business at 
Enfield, Mass., during the active period of his 
life, and died in 1882. His business ability 
and sound judgment made him especially 
eligible to public office, and he served as Rep- 
resentative to the legislature in 1844 and 
1864. He married Hannah Conkey, of Pres- 
cott, Mass. They had six children, three of 
whom are living, namely: Sarah E. , who 
completed her education at Mount Holyoke 
Seminary, and is now a teacher of classics in 
Easthampton, Mass. ; Charles S. Chapin, 
treasurer and general manager of the Wash- 
burn & Garfield Manufacturing Company, 
Worcester, Mass. ; and Francis L., the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

Francis L. Chapin acquired his elementary 
education in the common schools of Ware, 



Mass., and was fitted for college at the high 
school in that town. In 1862 he occupied the 
position of Assistant Postmaster in Ware, and 
later he entered the employ of the Ware Sav- 
ings Bank as a clerk. In June, 1864, he en- 
listed as a private in the Worcester City 
Guards, under Captain Robert H. Chamber- 
lain, for one hundred days' service in the 
Civil War. This company, which was at- 
tached to the Sixtieth Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Volunteers, under Colonel Ansel D. 
Wass, spent the greater part of its stipulated 
term in guarding Confederate prisoners at 
Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Ind. Mr. 
Chapin was made Second Sergeant, and later 
became Second Lieutenant of an unattached 
company. After his discharge he resumed 
his former position in the Ware Savings 
Bank. In 1865 he was offered a clerkship in 
the Southbridge Bank, which up to that time 
had carried on business under the old State 
system. Accepting the offer, he was in a 
short time advanced to the position of cashier, 
and was later appointed general manager. 

Mr. Chapin has rendered valuable aid, both 
by his means and influence, in developing the 
business resources of the town and introduc- 
ing public improvements. He is treasurer of 
the Southbridge & Sturbridge Street Rail- 
way Company ; he was for a number of years 
president of the Water Supply Company, 
whose charter he was instrumental in secur- 
ing; and he acted as general manager during 
the construction of the works. He is a trus- 
tee of the Southbridge Savings Bank, a mem- 
ber of the Board of Investment, and was chair- 
man of the committee which superintended 
the erection of the present bank building. 
He was also chairman of the committee hav- 
ing charge of the construction of the Young 
Men's Christian Association Building and the 
Congregational church. During his residence 
in Southbridge he has settled a number of es- 
tates, and is a trustee of several at the present 
time. 

In 1869 Mr. Chapin was united in marriage 
with Sarah Bell Lawton, daughter of Joseph 
R. and Sarah L. (Mallalieu) Lawton. She is 
a sister of Bishop W. F. Mallalieu of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, who has travelled 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



extensively in Europe and the Far East, and 
is now a resident of Boston. Mr. and Mrs. 
Chapin are the parents of six children, 
namely: Florence E., who was born July 30, 
1873, and completed her education at Mount 
Holyoke Seminary; Mary Louise, who was 
born March 14, 1875, was educated at a private 
school in Springfield, Mass., and is now the 
wife of H. H. Morse, of Southbridge, where 
he is superintendent of the street railway; 
Mabel E. , born on October 15, 1870, who 
spent some time abroad after completing her 
education, and is now the wife of H. S. 
Cheney, of Southbridge, a member of the 
American Optical Company; Ruth M., born 
December 11, 1876, who attended Vassar Col- 
lege, is now Mrs. Frederick W. Parks, of 
Fitchburg, Mass.; Sarah C, born on March 
12, 1880, who is now attending Miss Porter's 
private school in Springfield; and Edward L. 
Chapin, born January 25, 1886. 

In politics Mr. Chapin is a Republican. 
For twenty -four consecutive years he held the 
office of Town Treasurer, to which he was 
elected regardless of party lines. As Repre- 
sentative to the legislature in 1884 he was 
assigned to the Finance Committee. He is a 
member of the Congregational church and 
treasurer of the society, and is a comrade of 
Malcolm Ammidown Post, No. 168, G. A. R. 




ALTER P., BENJAMIN E., and 
ELBRIDGE G. GUY, who, under 
the firm name of the Guy Furniture 
Company, carry on an extensive business in 
three large buildings, 517 to 527 Main Street, 
Worcester, are natives of Norfolk County, 
Massachusetts, and sons of Timothy and Eliza- 
beth Clapp (Perry) Guy. Their father, Tim- 
othy Guy, who was born in Dover, Mass., Oc- 
tober 3, 1809, was a son of Benjamin Guy, a 
native of the same place and a school teacher 
by occupation. The first American ancestor 
of the family was Timothy Guy, who came 
from Bristol, England, and settled in that part 
of Dedham that was afterward incorporated as 
the town of Dover. He was a man of power- 
ful physique, and served as a soldier in the 
French and Indian War. He was also a mem- 



ber of the famous Boston Tea Party, and gave 
the war-whoop as the signal to throw the tea 
overboard. In 1748 he married Martha 
Plympton, of Medfield, Mass. The paternal 
great-grandfather of the three brothers whose 
names begin this sketch, Benjamin Guy (first) 
married Deborah Morse, a native of Sherborn, 
Mass., who died in 1835, aged ninety-four 
years. Their son, Benjamin Guy (second) the 
next in line of descent, married Sarah Smith, 
of Medfield, in 1805. 

The Guy Furniture Company is one of the 
largest establishments of its kind in New Eng- 
land outside of Boston. It occupies seven- 
teen floors of a capacious building, which are 
heavily stocked with parlor, dining-room, 
chamber, library, kitchen, and miscellaneous 
furniture, carpets, crockery, and glassware, 
lamps, ranges, parlor stoves, and bicycles. 
The concern has branch establishments in 
Brockton and Springfield. 



^?J)/lLDE] 
\SV agric 



ILDER U. BARNES, a leading 
iculturist and milk producer of 
North Brookfield, was born in Hard- 
wick, Mass., February 12, 1840, son of Harvey 
and Harriet (Gregg) Barnes. Both his great- 
grandfather, Jesse Barnes, and his grandfather, 
Asa, belonged to that place. While his 
mother was a native of Boston, Mass., his ma- 
ternal ancestors, the Greggs, were of Scotch 
origin. 

Reared to manhood in his native town, 
young Barnes attended the common schools 
there. Like most men of his generation born 
in the country districts, he had but limited 
opportunities for acquiring knowledge in bis 
youth. However, such as they were, he used 
them to good advantage. Fired with patriot- 
ism and eager to take some part in the great 
conflict between the North and the South, Mr. 
Barnes enlisted for the war in September, 
1862, joining Company K, Forty-second Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, and 
remained in service until August of the fol- 
lowing year. He was with General Banks in 
the expedition against New Orleans, where his 
company was detailed to lay a pontoon bridge 
and guard it. After his discharge from the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



army he returned to Hardwick. In the spring 
of 1873 he came to North Brookfield, and set- 
tled on the farm which has since been his 
home. This farm, comprising one hundred 
acres of land, is in an excellent state of culti- 
vation. Much historical interest attaches to 
it because it was formerly owned by General 
Rufus Putnam, of Revolutionary fame. In 
politics Mr. Barnes is a Republican. He is a 
member of the North Brookfield Grange and 
of Ezra Batchellor Post, No. 51, G. A. R. 
At present he is Constable of the town. 

On April 20, 1864, Mr. Barnes was married 
to Rhoda J. Fay, a native of Hardwick and a 
daughter of Timothy and Mary (Hammond) 
Fay. The father, also a native of Hardwick, 
was a Lieutenant in the State militia, and 
served on the School Committee. His surviv- 
ing children are: James P., who resides in 
Hardwick; Rhoda J., now Mrs. Barnes; Mrs. 
Larrissa Ashcroft, now a widow, residing in 
Springfield; Augusta, the wife of George 
Woods, of North Brookfield; and Mercy A., 
now Mrs. Pepper, also a widow, residing in 
North Brookfield. The mother was born in 
Worcester County. Mr. Lindsay, a great- 
grandfather of Mrs. Barnes, was a sea captain 
at the time the Revolutionary War broke out, 
and his ship was one of the first fired on by the 
British. Mrs. Barnes is a member of the 
Union Congregational Church at North Brook- 
field. Her children are: Fred W., Jennie 
M., George H., Herbert W., and Addie L. 
Jennie is the wife of Frank Holman, and 
Addie is the wife of Arthur H. Burdick. 



m 



WILLIAM GARDNER TUT- 
TLE, who for ten years prior to his 
death, which occurred August 5, 
1897, resided in Worcester, Mass., 
was a man of eminent worth and strong person- 
ality, whose influence rested like a benedic- 
tion upon the people and the place. He was 
born September 25, 1819, in Littleton, Mass., 
which had been the home of his ancestors for 
generations. 

The Tuttle family is supposed to be of 
Welsh origin. The name is derived from 
"Tuthill," which in former centuries was 



applied to artificial mounds used for pagan 
worship, and, it is said, was evolved from 
"Thoth," the Egyptian god of wisdom and 
the inventor of art, science, speech, and 
letters. 

John Tuttle, the founder of this branch of 
the family in New England, came to Massa- 
chusetts in the good ship "Planter" in 1635, 
and, settling in Ipswich, was a man of promi- 
nence in that town, which be represented at 
the General Court in 1644. The line was 
continued through his son, Simon Tuttle, 2 
Simon, Jr., 3 Samuel, 4 William, 5 Thomas 
Sparhawk, 6 to William Gardner. 7 Many of 
the descendants of John Tuttle have won dis- 
tinction in professional and literary circles, 
notable among them being Nathan Dane, 
founder of the Harvard Law School ; the Hon. 
William Prescott ; William Hickling Pres- 
cott, the historian; and members of the Hale 
family. Simon Tuttle, Jr., settled in Little- 
ton in the early part of the eighteenth century, 
and on the farm which he reclaimed from the 
wilderness his descendants for several genera- 
tions were born and brought up. 

Thomas Sparhawk Tuttle was born on the 
Littleton homestead in 1796, and in after 
years succeeded to its ownership. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Mary Butterfield, was 
a descendant of William Longley, who died in 
1680. 

William G. Tuttle acquired his early educa- 
tion in the common schools of Littleton and at 
the Groton Academy. He subsequently pre- 
pared for college at Phillips Academy, An- 
dover, where he was graduated in 1842. He 
received his Bachelor's degree at Amherst 
College in 1846, was graduated at the Andover 
Theological Seminary in 1849, and on April 
17 of that year he was licensed to preach. 
For several months he filled the pulpit of the 
Congregational Church of Littleton, in which 
he had received his first religious teaching 
outside of the home fireside and with which he 
had united when young. On June 25, 1851, 
he was settled at Harrisville, N. H., where he 
remained until forced to resign on account of 
ill health in 1S60. On October 10, 1861, 
after a long rest, he accepted a call to the 
First Congregational Church at Ware, Mass., 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2I 3 



and during the twenty-six years that followed 
his labors in that community were abundantly 
blessed. His health again becoming under- 
mined, he resigned his pastorate on April 2, 
1887, much to the regret, not only of his pa- 
rishioners, but of all the townspeople. Re- 
siding in Worcester, he preached in Holden, 
Mass., for nearly a year; and in 1889 he 
preached for ten months at Lake View, in 
Worcester, his ministerial work being after- 
ward confined to supplying temporarily pulpits 
in or near Worcester. His last service was on 
March 1, 1896, when he administered the 
communion to his former church in Ware. 

Numerous were the tributes paid to this 
good man after his departure, and none were 
more hearty and sincere than those that came 
from them who had known him the longest and 
had loved him the best. One who had known 
him through boyhood, youth, and manhood 
said, "No one ever touched him without be- 
coming better, and his briefest visits were an 
honor and an inspiration." A man of tender, 
loving spirit and broad sympathy, unselfishly 
devoted to the higher interests of humanity, 
he found fellowship with all who sought to 
build up righteousness. 

On July 31, 1851, Mr. Tuttle married Har- 
riet Elizabeth Wallace, of Milford, N.H. Of 
the children born of this union, two are liv- 
ing, namely: Harriette Wallace, who for sev- 
eral years was a member of the faculty at 
Wellesley College; and Edward Gerry, a 
prominent physician and surgeon of New York 
City. 



'OHN B. WELLS, a venerable resident 
of Rutland, son of Rossiter and Emily 
(Butler) Wells, was born at Wethers- 
field, Conn., December 26, 18 1 7. His 
maternal grandfather, John Butler, who was 
by occupation a farmer, and who fought in the 
war of the Revolution, died at the age of 
seventy years. Rossiter Wells, born in 
Wethersfield, was a lifelong farmer in that 
town, and died there at the age of eighty-eight 
years. In politics he was successively a 
Whig and a Republican. His wife, who was 
born in the same town, lived to be eighty-five 



years old. Both were members of the Congre- 
gational church. Of their nine children, 
eight sons and one daughter, the daughter, 
Rossiter, Stephen, and Albert are deceased. 
The survivors are: John B. , Israel S. , Levi 
W. , Frank, and Isaac N. 

John B. Wells remained in Wethersfield 
with his parents until about seventeen years 
of age, when he went away to learn the cabi- 
net-maker's trade. This he subsequently 
worked at until the Civil War broke out. In 
1842 he came to Rutland, locating in New 
Boston. He lived there for a time, and then 
moved to another place. He bought his pres- 
ent homestead in 1848. Here since the Civil 
War he has carried on general farming. On 
June 13, 1850, he was married to Emily R. 
Sawtell, who was born in Phillipston, Mass., 
May 26, 1823. Her parents, Henry and Re- 
becca (Farnsworth) Sawtell, were both natives 
of this county. The father, who was a farmer, 
died in Petersham at the age of forty-two 
years. The mother lived to be ninety-four. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wells have one daughter, Mary 
L., the wife of William H. Maynard, of Rut- 
land. Mrs. Maynard was born on December 
29, 1858. Her husband, who is a farmer, was 
born in Fitchburg, Mass., November 29, 
1853. Their children are: Louise E., born 
October 15, 1892; and Frank W. , born Au- 
gust 20, 1896. Mr. and Mrs. Wells had a son, 
who lived only a few months. Both are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church. In poli- 
tics Mr. Wells is a Prohibitionist. He has 
served the town for two years as Selectman 
and for two years on the Board of Overseers of 
the Poor. Mr. and Mrs. Wells are among the 
few couples in town who have spent nearly a 
half-century of wedded life together. Their 
home has been a most happy one, and they 
have many friends. 



7~AHARLES N. SHEPARD, a promi- 
I VV nent agriculturist of Warren, son of 

vip^^ the late David Shepard, Jr., was 
born on the farm he now occupies, 
August 9, 1836. His homestead was re- 
claimed from the wilderness by his great- 
grandfather, William Shepard, who was one of 



214 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the original settlers of the town. It has since 
been owned and occupied by his descendants, 
including Mabel B. Shepard, of the sixth gen- 
eration, the little daughter of Herbert N. 
Shepard, and the grand-daughter of Charles 
N. William was born March 15, 1725. His 
wife, Eleanor, was born August 3, 1733. 

David Shepard, Sr. , son of William and the 
grandfather of Charles N., was born on this 
farm, and, with the exception of a few years 
spent in New York State, was here occupied 
in farming throughout his active life. David 
Shepard, Jr., born in New York State, was 
brought up in Warren, and in its public 
schools received his education. After the 
death of his father he came into possession of 
the home farm ; and from that time until his 
demise, which occurred December 19, 1885, 
he was actively engaged in farming. He mar- 
ried Lucinda Woods, of West Brookfield, 
Mass. Of their children, four are living, 
namely: David W., of Warren; Charlotte 
F., the wife of F. W. Keyes, of Warren; 
Charles N., the subject of this sketch; and 
William H., of Cleveland, Ohio. 

Having passed through the public schools 
of Warren, Charles N. Shepard completed his 
education at the Monson Academy, an institu- 
tion of some note in his day. Afterward, 
choosing farming for his life occupation, he 
assisted his father in the management and 
improvement of the ancestral homestead, to 
which he has since succeeded. A man of 
sound judgment and well-versed in agricult- 
ure, he has been eminently successful as a 
general farmer and dairyman. Keeping fine 
graded cattle, he makes a specialty of produc- 
ing cream, which he ships to Worcester, 
Mass. In politics he is an adherent of the 
Republican party. For one year he served his 
fellow-townsmen as Selectman. He has been 
a member of the Quaboag Lodge, F. & A. M., 
of Warren, for about forty years. 

On December 20, 1864, Mr. Shepard mar- 
ried Abby R. Bowen, a native of Ware, Mass., 
which was also the birthplace of her parents, 
Sylvester and Nancy (Eaton) Bowen. Mr. 
Bowen, who belonged to an old family of 
Ware, served for several years as Selectman 
and Assessor of his native town. Darius 



Eaton, a maternal ancestor of Mr. Shepard, 
was a soldier in the War of the Revolution. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bowen reared several children, 
of whom the survivors are: Mrs. D. S. Ellis 
and Ellen M. Bowen, both of Rome, N.Y. , 
and Sylvester W. Bowen, of Wendell, Mass. 
Mr. and Mrs. Shepard's only child, Herbert 
N. , resides on the ancestral homestead with 
his parents. He married Grace M., daughter 
of W. E. Patrick, the chairman of the Board 
of Selectmen of Warren, and has one child, 
Mabel B., born April 1, 1896. Mrs. Shepard 
is an active member of the Congregational 
church, of the Home Missionary Society, and 
of the Woman's Auxiliary Society. 




LIVER GOODNOW, a venerable and 
highly esteemed resident of Paxton, 
son of Oliver Goodnow, Sr. , was born 
August 4, 1816, in Newfane, Wind- 
ham County, Vt. He comes of English stock. 
It is said that his paternal grandfather, John 
Goodnow, who resided for many years in 
Needham, Mass., was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary War. The father, who was born in 
Needham, Mass., after his marriage with 
Catherine Ball, of South Hadley, Mass., re- 
moved to Newfane, Vt., where he was success- 
fully engaged as a farmer until his death, in 
the fifty-eighth year of his age. Regarded as 
a man of ability and good judgment, he was 
a Selectman in Vermont for several years. 

Oliver Goodnow, the subject of this sketch, 
received a good education in the public schools 
of Newfane. At the age of eighteen he went 
to Boston, and was there employed for a brief 
time by Dr. Walter Channing, one of the 
prominent men of that city. Two years later, 
in 1836, he became a clerk in the store and 
hotel of Harvey Wilson in Paxton. Subse- 
quently, after learning the trade of a boot- 
maker, he worked for thirty-four consecutive 
years in the employment of Lakin & Bigelow, 
boot manufacturers in this town. Since that 
time he has been prosperously engaged in 
farming. 

A Republican in politics and interested in 
the welfare of the town, Mr. Goodnow has 
served for five years as Selectman and Over- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2I S 



seer of the Poor and for two years as Assessor. 
He is an active member of the Congregational 
church, in which he sang for threescore years, 
being for about half of the time the leader of 
the choir. At the United States District 
Court in Boston in 1883 he was the foreman 
of the grand jury. He served as Justice 
of the Peace for two terms of seven years each, 
and he is a trustee of Worcester County Agri- 
culture Society. In October, 1838, he was 
married to Abigail M. Abbott, who was born 
in Paxton, Mass., daughter of Aaron Abbott, 
formerly an esteemed resident of this town. 



'ASON B. HILL, a prominent and in- 
fluential resident of North Brookfield, 
was born here, December 11, 1820. 
A son of Kittredge and Sarah (Bigelow) 
Hill, he is a grandson of Thomas Hill, who 
in earlier days was a leading resident of 
North Brookfield. Both of his parents were 
born here. The father in early life was a 
teamster. Later he became one of the well- 
known farmers of this section. He held vari- 
ous town offices, and also represented the town 
in the legislature. Of his children, four are 
living, namely: Kittredge, who resides in the 
State of Indiana; Nancy E. , a resident of 
North Brookfield; Jason B. ; and Lewis E. 

Jason B. Hill attended the district school 
of his time, profiting, as far as he was able, by 
the instruction therein imparted. He also 
gained during boyhood a knowledge of prac- 
tical farming that has been of much value to 
him in more recent years. Upon reaching his 
majority he went to Boston, where he entered 
the employ of his brother-in-law, C. P. 
Adams, as salesman in the produce commis- 
sion business. Mr. Adams was one of the 
well-known merchants of Boston, and for a 
quarter of a century Mr. Hill was his most 
trusted assistant. At the end of that time the 
latter returned to North Brookfield and took 
charge of Mr. Adams's large real estate inter- 
ests here. Besides this he has carried on gen- 
eral farming on his own account on his fine 
farm of one hundred and forty acres, which is 
situated near North Brookfield village. 

Mr. Hill was married in 1850, June 13, to 



Frances A. Corbett, a daughter of David Cor- 
bett, of Roxbury, Mass. One son has been 
born of this union, namely: Edward K. Hill, 
who is a member of the American Wheelock 
Engine Company, and resides in Worcester, 
Mass. He is a skilful and thorough mechani- 
cal engineer. The company has establish- 
ments in New York, Chicago, and Worcester; 
and the noted ship-builders, the Cramps, have 
an interest in the concern. Mrs. Hill died on 
June 1, 1895, leaving a void in the lives of 
her family and friends that can never be filled. 
Possessed of unusual ability as a musician, she 
was well known among singers in Boston dur- 
ing her residence there. She was a promi- 
nent member of the North Brookfield Grange, 
and was closely associated with the social and 
benevolent work of the First Congregational 
Church. Since her death Mr. Hill has placed 
a beautiful window in the church as a memo- 
rial to her. 

Much interested in educational matters, 
Mr. Hill has served for three years on the 
School Board of the town. In politics he is a 
Republican. An active member of the 
Grange, he has been for some years past its 
treasurer. He attends the First Congrega- 
tional Church, and contributes liberally to the 
support of its varied activities. 



OSHUA W. MORSE, an esteemed 
resident of Northbridge, was born in 
Whitingham, Vt., February 4, 1820. 
He is a son of David and Mary (Whit- 
ney) Morse and a grandson of Simeon and 
Azubah (Wheeler) Morse. Simeon Morse, 
who was a farmer of Sutton, served as a sol- 
dier in the war of the Revolution, stationed in 
New York State, and at a later date became 
a strong supporter of General Jackson. Both 
he and his wife are buried in the family bury- 
ing-ground at Sutton. 

David Morse, who was born in Sutton, re- 
moved to Vermont when a young man, and 
there married, and subsequently lived for a 
time. When his son, Joshua, was six years 
old, he returned to the old homestead in Sut- 
ton. He resided there until April, 1865, 
when he bought a farm in Northbridge vil- 



2l6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



lage, where he passed the remainder of his 
life. Taking an active interest in local poli- 
tics, he was an old-time Whig and an ardent 
follower of General Jackson. Of his family 
of ten children, four are living. The latter 
are: Mrs. Mary Whiting, of Northbridge ; 
Edward Morse, a well-known farmer of this 
town; Moses Morse, of Spencer; and Joshua 
W., the subject of this biography. George, 
who was a grocer in Central Falls, R.I., died 
in 1893. 

Joshua W. Morse received his education in 
the schools of Sutton. After leaving school 
he worked on his father's farm until he was 
twenty years of age. Having learned the 
shoemaker's trade, he came to Northbridge 
Centre, and here engaged in cutting leather. 
For twenty-five years he had charge of the 
cutting department. About twenty-five years 
ago he left the manufacturing business, and 
has since been engaged in farming, devoting 
his attention chiefly to raising small fruits. 
A strong anti-slavery man, he occupied a seat 
in the State legislature in 1861. He has 
been Selectman of the town for a number of 
years. A member of the Congregational 
church for the past forty years, he has served 
as Deacon for nine years; and he was the clerk 
of the society for many years. 

Mr. Morse has been three times married. 
The respective maiden names of his first and 
second wives were Deborah C. Brown and 
Mary S. Day. The latter was a Northbridge 
lady. The third marriage was contracted with 
Lydia A. Searles, who is a native of Sutton. 
A daughter by the first marriage died at the 
age of one year. A daughter by the second 
marriage married Frank A. Holbrook, and 
died in Providence, R.I. , in 1897, leaving a 
daughter aged five years. 




HERBERT De FOSSE, the Sealer 
of Weights and Measures for the city 
Is " of Worcester, was born in Nicolet, 
County of Nicolet, P.O., on Sep- 
tember 24, 1 87 1. A son of Hubert and 
Agnes (Cloutier) de Fosse, he is a descendant 
of the old French family, the Savoys, which 
furnished officers to the army of Napoleon I., 



and has been widely known as a military 
race. His paternal great-grandmother was 
the famous nurse, Marguerite de Laby; and 
his maternal great-great-grandfather was the 
Count de Castelet, who belonged to the family 
of the De Salamons. The maternal grand- 
father was a noted mill contractor and an in- 
ventor of mill machinery. Hubert de Fosse, 
who was an architect in Nicolet, came to 
Worcester when his son Herbert was a very 
young child, and was employed by Norcross 
Brothers on fine wood work. 

Having begun his schooling in this city, C. 
Herbert de Fosse at the age of fourteen re- 
turned to Nicolet, and attended college there 
for a time. Afterward he learned the carpen- 
ter's trade, working at it for three years. He 
then entered the employ of the Richardson 
Manufacturing Company as general mechanic, 
and remained with them until his appointment 
to his present position of Sealer of Weights 
and Measures. Mr. de Fosse was one of the 
organizers of the Worcester branch of the 
Young Men's French Catholic Association 
and its secretary for several years, also of the 
Conference Notre Dame of the Society of St. 
Vincent de Paul, of which he was also the 
secretary for a long period. 

He is also the vice-president of 1' Union 
Canadien, the secretary of St. Joseph's Liter- 
ary Association, a director of the Ward Three 
Naturalization Club, and he is one of the 
members of the Executive Committee of the 
Young Men's Republican Club of Worcester, 
which he helped to organize. For many 
years he was the chairman of the Board of 
Auditors for the St. Ann's Total Abstinence 
Association, and he is one of the county's 
strong total abstinence workers. He has been 
the president of the Drum Corps Musical As- 
sociation, and his reputation as a drum-major 
is known throughout the State. The Franco- 
American Club numbers him among its most 
valued members, and has paid him the compli- 
ment of electing him its presiding officer. 
At the present time he is also Chief Ranger of 
Court Louis Joseph Papinneau, No. 71, F. of 
A., which is said to be the largest court in 
Worcester and the richest in the United 
States; and he is quartermaster of one of the 




C. HERBERT DE FOSSE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



219 



American companies of Pontifical Zouaves, 
and the honorary secretary of the Guard of 
Honor. 

In politics a Republican, Mr. de Fosse is 
the present secretary of the Republican City 
Committee. During the campaign of 1896 he 
stumped for McKinley, speaking both in 
French and English in some of the Western 
States, and acquiring quite a reputation as a 
public speaker. Some years since, when a 
candidate for the legislature in a Democratic 
district, he came within four votes of defeat- 
ing his opponent. He is a vice-president of 
the Fremont Club of Massachusetts, generally 
known as the French Republican Club. For 
some time he has been a Notary Public and 
Justice of the Peace. Several breezy and in- 
teresting articles from his pen have appeared 
in the public press, and he is the author of a 
number of clever plays. No man of the 
French population in America is considered a 
better authority on historical and statistical 
facts concerning them. He is in frequent de- 
mand as a lecturer on various topics, both in 
French and in English. His frequent selection 
as a presiding officer is due to the recognition 
of his unusual knowledge of parliamentary 
rules. Devoted to his family, he has at his 
own expense educated two sisters and a 
brother. At the present time one of these is 
a pupil of Hinman's Business College. Mr. 
de Fosse attends the Church of Notre Dame. 



^NENJAMIN F. BROOKS, Postmaster 
^~x of Barre and a Civil War veteran, 
-) J was born in Petersham, Mass., April 
4, 1844, son of John F. and Isabella 
R. (Brown) Brooks. He traces his descent to 
one of three brothers who arrived from Eng- 



land 



1631. His grandfather, Austi 



Brooks, whose birth occurred in Petersham, 
December 9, 1788, spent the active period of 
his life prosperously engaged in agriculture, 
and died in his native town in 1869. Austin 
Brooks married Martha Bent, who, born No- 
vember 13, 1794, died in 1866. John F. 
Brooks, son of Austin, was born in Petersham, 
September 26, 18 14. In his younger days 
he was a palm-leaf finisher. Later he was 



engaged in the hotel business, and was the 
proprietor of the old Massasoit House in 
Barre from 1865 until his death, which oc- 
curred October 13, 1889. Originally a Whig, 
he joined the Republican party, by which he 
was elected to some of the town offices. His 
wife, Isabella, who was born in Royalston, 
Mass., May 3, 1818, reared two sons: Benja- 
min F., the subject of this sketch; and Ed- 
ward H., born January 31, 1847, who died 
March 29, 1892. In religion she is a Congre- 
gationalism and she resides in Barre. 

Benjamin F. Brooks was reared and edu- 
cated in Templeton, Mass. In 1862 he en- 
listed in Company D, Thirty-sixth Regiment, 
Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. Serving 
in the Civil War, he participated in the battles 
of Fredericksburg, Jackson, the Wilderness, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna River, and Cold 
Harbor, and in the sieges of Vicksburg, 
Knoxville, and Petersburg. Having been 
honorably discharged from the army in 1865, 
he entered the service of the Adams Express 
Company as messenger and agent at Danbury, 
Conn., remaining in their employ until 1873. 
The succeeding two years were spent in Barre. 
In 1875 he engaged in the meat and provision 
business in Boston, where he remained until 
August, 1876. Then he returned to Barre, 
and became associated with his father in the 
management of the Massasoit House. In 
1890 he sold his interest in the house, and, 
receiving the appointment of Postmaster, con- 
ducted the business of that office efficiently for 
the ensuing four years and one month. In 
May, 1898, he was reappointed Postmaster, 
and he has served in that capacity since June 1. 
In politics he is a Republican, and he is now 
serving his fourth term as a member of the 
Board of Assessors. 

On May 16, 1868, Mr. Brooks was joined 
in marriage at Madison, Conn., with Libbie 
A. Russell, who was born in Portland, Conn., 
August 28, 1845, daughter of John C. Russell. 
By this union there is one daughter, Beth I. 
Brooks, born in Barre, May 8, 1886. Mrs. 
Brooks died March 15, 1S97. She was a 



member of the Congregational church. 



Mr. 



Brooks is a member of Mount Zion Lodge, 
F. & A. M., and has advanced in the order as 



iio 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



far as the commandery. He was one of the 
organizers of Samuel F. Woods Post, No. 179, 
G. A. R., of which he was Commander for the 
first six years of its existence, and has been 
the Commander again since his election at the 
last annual meeting. 



XfREEMAN R. DOANE, a well-known 
PM and respected resident of North Brook- 
field, son of Roland F. Doane, was 
born in this town, January 27, 1837. Plis pa- 
ternal grandfather, Captain Joseph Doane, who 
was born on Cape Cod, spent his early life in 
seafaring, and subsequently removed with 
his family to North Brookfield, where his re- 
maining years were passed. 

Roland F. Doane, born in one of the towns 
on the Cape Cod peninsula, accompanied his 
parents to North Brookfield when a small boy. 
Besides carrying on mixed farming, he oper- 
ated a saw-mill for many years, successfully 
manufacturing lumber. His death occurred 
in 1891. He married Amanda Shedd, a na- 
tive of Vermont. Of their children the sur- 
vivors are: Freeman R., the subject of this 
biography; Hubbard S. , a resident of Brook- 
field; Edwin, a resident of Worcester, Mass. ; 
Lydia A., the wife of Daniel Gilbert, of this 
town; Ellen R., the wife of Ethan Allen Har- 
wood, of whom a sketch may be found else- 
where in this work; and Jonas M. , of Brock- 
ton, Mass. 

Freeman R. Doane received a practical 
common-school education, and on the home 
farm was thoroughly trained in the art of agri- 
culture as practised at that day. After com- 
ing of age he entered the employ of E. & 
A. H. Batcheller & Co., boot and shoe manu- 
facturers, with whom he remained for thirty- 
five consecutive years, having charge of the 
shipping department for a large part of the 
time. In 1894 he severed his connection with 
that firm, and has since devoted his time to his 
private interests. Mustered into the service 
of the Union in 1862, he served in the Civil 
War for one year as a private in Company F, 
Forty-second Massachusetts Volunteer Infan- 
try, being for a part of the time on duty in 
New Orleans, and participating in General 



Banks's expedition. He is now an active 
member of the Ezra Batcheller Post, No. 51, 
G. A. R., which he served as Quartermaster 
for two years; and he also belongs to the 
North Brookfield Lodge of the I. O. O. F. 
In politics he is a consistent Republican. 
For three years he was Selectman, at the same 
time serving as the clerk of the board. At 
present he is a director of the North Brook- 
field Railway Company, which controls the 
branch of the Boston & Albany Railway ex- 
tending from North Brookfield to East Brook- 
field. 

On November 24, 1859, Mr. Doane first 
married Miss Anna M. Harwood, a daughter 
of George and Angeline (Allen) Harwood, 
and who bore him four children — George R., 
Elmer F., Albion H., and Irene R. Elmer 
and Irene are deceased. The mother passed 
away November 23, 1868. The present Mrs. 
Doane was formerly Mrs. Elizabeth Rosson, 
widow of the late Joseph K. Rosson. 



OHN E. KIMBALL, a retired educator 
residing in Oxford, a son of William 
and Mary (Robinson) Seaman Kimball, 
was born in Webster, July 18, 1833. 
He is a descendant in the seventh generation 
of Richard Kimball, his immigrant ancestor, 
from whom the line of descent comes through 
Samuel and Ebenezer, second, to his grand- 
father, Samuel Kimball. The latter enlisted 
for service in the Revolution, June 6, 1777, at 
Woodstock, Conn., in Captain William Man- 
ning's Company, Second Connecticut Regi- 
ment, commanded by the redoubtable Israel 
Putnam, and was honorably discharged January 
9, 1778. On July 1, 1780, he re-enlisted in 
the Fourth Connecticut Regiment, Colonel 
John Durkee, of Norwich, commanding, from 
which he was honorably discharged on Decem- 
ber 10 of the same year. He shared the hard- 
ships of the winter at Valley Forge, and was 
with the main army on the Hudson at the time 
of Benedict Arnold's treachery. 

William Kimball, who was the eighth child 
of Samuel Kimball, served as a Corporal in 
the War of 1812. He was a skilful mechanic, 
and for ten years held the position of superin- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



22T 



tendent of Slater's mill at South Oxford. All 
of his children have displayed ability in their 
several walks of life. George R. , who was 
born July i, 1828, enlisted in the Sixteenth 
Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, for service 
in the Civil War; and, having been wounded 
twice at the battle of Antietam, was trans- 
ferred to the Veterans' Reserve Corps, from 
which he was discharged in July, 1865. 
Thomas D., born December 20, 1838, who 
studied for one year at Yale College, and com- 
pleted the medical course at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, New York, entered 
the Union army as Captain of Company G, 
Fifty-first Regiment, Massachusetts Volun- 
teers, was subsequently transferred to the 
Second Heavy Artillery, and after the close 
of the Rebellion settled in St. Louis, Mo. 

John E. Kimball went from the public 
schools to Dudley Academy, and later at- 
tended Leicester Academy, where he was a 
schoolmate of the Hon. Richard Olney, the 
Secretary of State in President Cleveland's 
last administration. In his Sophomore year 
at Yale he took the second prize for English 
composition, and in the following term he was 
awarded the third prize for proficiency in the 
same subject and the first for declamation. 
During his Junior and Senior years he was 
the editor of the Yale literary magazine, 
Statement of Facts, and he was orator for 
Linonia. Among his classmates were the 
Hon. William T. Harris, the present Commis- 
sioner of Education; Dr. William Garrison 
Brinton, the well-known author; Josiah Will- 
ard Gibbs, the mathematician ; Arthur Mat- 
thewson, M. D., the noted oculist; the Rev. 
Dr. Noble, of Chicago; and Addison Van 
Name, the libarian at Yale University. 
After leaving Yale he was the principal of 
the Oxford High School for a year. Then he 
went South, and just prior to the breaking 
out of the Rebellion was teaching a private 
school near Louisville, Ky. Having caused 
much excitement here, when, loyal to the 
Union, he cast the only vote for Lincoln 
and Hamlin, he went to Chicago, where 
a few days after his arrival he was ap- 
pointed principal of the Ogden School. 
A year later in St. Louis he became first 



principal of the Washington School, and 
for the succeeding eighteen years was prom- 
inently identified with public education in 
that city. After returning to the East in 
1880, he was local superintendent of public 
schools in Hartford, Conn., for a year. Then 
he was elected to the position of superinten- 
dent in Newton, Mass., which he efficiently 
filled until he resigned in 1884. He has since 
resided in Oxford. Having acquired an inter- 
est in the Oxford National Bank, he was for 
some years a director of that institution. 

Mr. Kimball is not married. He has been 
quite active in the public affairs of Oxford 
since his return. The present chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen, he also served in that 
capacity in 1886, 1888, and 1897. For twelve 
consecutive years he has been elected Modera- 
tor at the annual town meeting. He was for- 
merly the chairman of the School Board and of 
the Board of Trustees of the Free Public Li- 
brary. He also acts as a Justice of the 
Peace, with authority to issue warrants and 
accept bail. For three years he was a mem- 
ber of the Massachusetts Board of Agriculture, 
and he served upon the committee having 
charge of the State Agricultural College at 
Amherst. In 1871 he visited Europe, and 
was made an associate member of the Philo- 
sophical Society of Great Britain. His Alma 
Mater conferred upon him the degree of Master 
of Arts in 1871. He has been a Deacon of 
the First Congregational Church since 1888, 
and is now chairman of the Board of Trustees. 




UGH J. ALLEN, who for many 
years was a leading farmer and a 
highly esteemed citizen of Worces- 
ter, residing at Maple Shade Farm 
on Salisbury Street, was born in New Brain- 
tree, September 12, 1827. His father, Israel 
Allen, who was a farmer in good circum- 
stances, died here in 1875, the year following 
that of his entrance on the farm and the seven- 
tieth of his age. His mother, Jerusha Thomp- 
son Allen, who died here in September, 1886, 
at the age of eighty, bore her husband nine 
children, of whom eight grew to maturity. 
Of the latter, six are living, three sons and 



222 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



three daughters. One of the daughters, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Whipple, resides in Hartford, 
Conn. ; and the other two, Mrs. Sarah E. Rice 
and Harriet A. Allen, reside in Hudson 
Street, this city. The sons are: William T. 
Allen, of Elliot Street; John L., who is in 
business in Main Street; and Jesse M., who 
resides in Holden. 

With the exception of three years, during 
which he was employed in a shoe factory, 
Hugh F. Allen was a lifelong farmer. After 
spending two and a half years in New Brain- 
tree, engaged in farming, he and his wife 
came to Worcester on May 16, 1863, settling 
on the farm of eighty-two acres which has 
since been the family home. In 1873 he 
erected a dwelling-house on the site of the 
present house. This was burned in 1895, 
after which the house now standing was built. 
Occupying a site on a rise of land, the new 
building commands a pleasing and somewhat 
extended view. As a farmer Mr. Allen was 
progressive and successful. Thoroughly inter- 
ested in his work, he enjoyed it, and had excel- 
lent health until he met with a series of acci- 
dents. At three different times he broke his 
ribs, and on another occasion he broke his 
shoulder. Later by falling from a wagon, the 
axle-tree of which had broken, he was injured 
in a manner that proved fatal. The sudden- 
ness of his death was a sad shock to his family 
and neighbors. 

Mr. Allen's marriage was contracted on No- 
vember iS, 1851, with Marion O. Ross, a 
daughter of William and Lucy B. (Otis) Ross, 
who were respectively natives of Waltham and 
Leominster. Mr. Ross, who was a mason by 
trade, died in 1889, and his wife in December, 
1876. Mrs. Allen was their only child. 
Born in Leominster, she grew up in Worces- 
ter. She is the mother of two children — 
Lizzie M. and William I., both at home. 
The latter, who manages the farm, married 
Nellie M. Tucker, and has a son six years old. 
Mr. Allen, Sr. , was a member of the Grange, 
P. of H., No. 22, had been its Master, and at 
the time of his death was serving it in another 
official capacity. In politics he was a stanch 
and active Republican, but never an aspirant 
to political honors. Both he and his wife 



were members of the Union Congregational 
Church. 



T^NHINEHAS BALL, eldest son of Ma- 
nasseh Sawyer and Clarissa (An- 
£) drews) Ball, was born in Boylston, 
Mass., January 18, 1824. He came 
of Puritan stock, being descended on the ma- 
ternal side from Simon and Anne Bradstreet. 
His father was the youngest son of Elijah 
Ball, a soldier of the Revolution who was in 
General Putnam's retreat on Long Island, and 
attained in 1779 the rank of First Lieutenant.. 
Elijah Ball had been a well-to-do farmer, but, 
when in his old age his acres passed to 
Manasseh, they were fallow and heavily 
mortgaged. Only by unremitting toil could 
they gain a livelihood. Manasseh Ball tilled 
his acres by day and hunted wild game or 
burned charcoal by night, and the son assisted 
to the utmost of his strength. But, in spite of 
the heavy labor required in farming, Mr. Ball 
found the life of the farmer attractive, and 
kept throughout his life a lively interest in 
agriculture. It was this interest, no doubt, 
that actuated in a measure his strenuous plea 
for sewage farming as the best method of sew- 
age disposal. 

Mr. Ball began life with a frail body, and 
his youth was a continued struggle with ill 
health. The seasons of close application in 
study and teaching were followed by severe 
illnesses that ate up his scanty earnings. Up 
to his sixteenth year he attended the brief 
terms of the district school, but in the winter 
of 1840 he spent some weeks in Woonsocket, 
R.I., with an uncle, Gardner Smith, who 
taught him the principles of surveying. 
About this time he came into possession of an 
old compass once the property of his great- 
great-grandfather, Robert Andrews, an early 
settler of Boylston. Thus equipped, Mr. Ball 
practised surveying, as opportunities afforded, 
about the farms in his neighborhood, in West 
Boylston and Worcester. But up to the time 
of his employment by the Worcester & 
Nashua Railroad in 1847 he had seen no sur- 
veying done by men of experience. 

In the fall of 1841 he went for a term of six 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



223 



weeks to Josiah Bride's English Boarding 
School in Berlin, and again the next fall he 
had a like term, which closed his schooling. 
The bill for these two terms is extant, and 
shows the expenses were met by the payment 
of one hundred and fourteen bushels of oak 
coal, ten bushels of potatoes, two barrels of 
apples, and forty pounds of dried apple. 

In the winter of 1841-42 Mr. Ball taught 
school in Southboro, the following winter 
in Lancaster, and the next in Marlboro. 
In the fall of 1846 he began the study of 
draughting in Worcester, but was soon pros- 
trated with typhoid fever and unable to do 
anything until the following March, when he 
again went to Worcester. Work came slowly. 
In June he was employed to survey the old 
Worcester aqueduct, and thus enabled to free 
himself from debt he felt himself fairly 
started in business. Though in November of 
that year he records earning but twenty-five 
cents during the entire month, still from 
this time he had a fair amount of business and 
was able to maintain himself, though for 
years it required the strictest economy. A 
debt of the smallest was always to him a 
thing abhorred, and when he died he had ab- 
solutely no personal debt of any kind. His 
early struggles made him meet others in like 
difficulty with ready sympathy. Indeed, it 
was never easy for him to say "No" to any 
one who asked his aid. 

Mr. Ball did not settle easily upon his life 
work. He had no decided bent. He liked 
surveying and he liked farming. Theology at- 
tracted him, and at one time he thought seri- 
ously of studying for the ministry. Then, 
too, he had a turn for mechanics. But en- 
gineering once settled upon he kept to it as a 
business; nor did he ever change his resi- 
dence, though strongly urged to do so by 
friends who went West. He was conserva- 
tive in many ways and certainly ill calcu- 
lated to endure any stress of competition. 

In April, 1849, he became associated with 
Elbridge Boyden under the firm of Boyden & 
Ball, architects and engineers, and the part- 
nership lasted until i860. His field books, 
covering a period of twenty-five years, show 
how closely he was identified with the growth 



of the city from its incorporation. With his 
transit and rod Governor Lincoln's pasture 
was laid out into streets and building lots, and 
the same is true of the other old estates that 
made up the early town. One foundation 
after another, for buildings, public and pri- 
vate, was staked out to the number of nearly 
five hundred. When he came to Worcester, 
new cesspools were needed in Main Street; 
and, after they had been built and became a 
menace to the health of the people, he planned 
the first sewer. He took whatever work 
offered, and into all alike ■ — measuring a com- 
post heap, staking the foundations of Me- 
chanics' Hall, or building the water-works — 
he put the same conscientious work. He al- 
ways regretted his lack of training. Being 
self-taught he lacked confidence, but he spared 
neither time nor strength,to make his work the 
best in his power; and vacations, save those 
forced by sickness, were unknown. 

While engaged in the general work about 
the city he was also concerned in the construc- 
tion of the Taunton Hospital for the Insane 
and the Fitchburg Jail. 

He became a member of the Worcester 
County Mechanics' Association in 1853, and 
served as clerk from 1859-65, and was treas- 
urer for seven years during that time, and was 
afterward director, vice-president, and presi- 
dent for short terms. In 1862 and 1863 he 
served the city in the Common Council; in 
1865 was Mayor; from 1863 to 1867 was 
Water Commissioner; and from 1S67 to 1872 
City Engineer. 

With the Yankee apitude for seeking the 
better or quicker method, Mr. Ball patented a 
number of appliances used in connection with 
the construction of water-works. After work- 
ing for some years on a water meter be found 
Mr. Benaiah Fitts had developed a like de- 
vice, and the two entered into partnership, 
patented the meter, and in November, 1869, 
the Union Water Meter Company was formed, 
with Mr. Ball as president, an office which he 
held until his death. His connection with 
this company prevented his holding any offi- 
cial position in the city after 1872, and in 
that year he was called as consulting engineer 
in the abatement of the Miller's River nui- 



224 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



sance. In 1873-75 ne built the Springfield 
water-works, and at the same time made 
plans for or reported upon water-works at 
Nashua, N. H., Amherst, Leominster, Marl- 
boro, Lawrence, and Westboro, Mass., New 
Haven and New Britain, Conn., and Portland, 
Me., and sewers for Keene, Fall River, and 
New Britain. In 1876 he sustained a griev- 
ous blow in the breaking of the dam at Lynde 
Brook Reservoir. It was his first consider- 
able work, in which he took just pride; and 
the disaster cut deep in his sensitive soul. 
He neither sought nor accepted any extenuat- 
ing circumstance, but put, if possible, added 
effort in the work that came to him in the re- 
construction of a broken dam at Clinton. 

In 1879 he began the Brockton water- 
works, and continued with that city as con- 
sulting engineer for a number of years, plan- 
ning the system of sewers. He also planned 
the sewerage of Amherst, Westboro, and of 
the Concord and Sherborn Prisons, water- 
works for Claremont, N. H., Gloucester, 
Mass., and additional water-works for Lynn, 
Mass., and New Haven, Conn. Though in 
the years 1883 to 1885 he suffered so much 
from asthma that it seemed impossible that he 
could do any more work, in 1887 he was so 
far recovered that he yielded to the request of 
the State Board of Health to plan the drainage 
of the Mystic Valley, and entered upon the 
work with his former energy and enthusiasm. 
But the malarial air of the Saugus marshes 
aggravated the old trouble, and the next sum- 
mer he was forced to resign the post. He 
continued as consulting engineer on the 
Brockton, Taunton, and Framingham sewage 
systems, but was not again able to undertake 
any arduous professional work. 

Mr. Ball was early interested in the tem- 
perance and anti-slavery movements. From 
the Free Soil he passed into the Republican 
party. Political chicanery filled him with 
astonishment and disgust, but he never failed 
to cast his vote. 

For thirty-one years he was Deacon of the 
First Unitarian Church and for seven years 
president of the Worcester County Confer- 
ence of Unitarian Churches. He was thor- 
oughly liberal in his views, finding good in 



all denominations, and wherever he might be 
was sure to attend some church unless pre- 
vented by sickness. He was a member of the 
Worcester County Society of Engineers, the 
Boston Society of Engineers, and the Ameri- 
can Water Works Association, and was also a 
member of the Worcester Society of Antiquity. 
His own slender advantages in the way of ed- 
ucation made him doubly interested in the 
subject, especially in that of technical educa- 
tion; and of all the duties that fell to him in 
his official capacity in 1865, undoubtedly he 
took most pleasure in those that sprang from 
his temporary connection with the Board, of 
Trustees of the Worcester County Free Insti- 
tute of Industrial Science, who were then 
planning the first buildings of the institute. 
In company with some members of the board 
he visited Williamstown, the Rensselaer Poly- 
technic and the Sheffield School of Science, 
and was present at the meeting held in Octo- 
ber of that year to urge forward the work. In 
February, 1S66, he surveyed the lot of land 
now occupied by the buildings, and at com- 
mencement in 1873 he served upon the 
Board of Examiners. For a number of years 
he took delight in visiting the old laboratory 
in Boynton Hall, and to the end of his life 
was interested in all that pertained to the 
school. 

He was twice married. To his first wife, 
Sarah Augusta Holyoke, daughter of William 
Holyoke, he was married at her home in Marl- 
boro, Mass., December 21, 1848. Two chil- 
dren were born to them, a son, who died in 
1857, and a daughter, who survives. Mrs. 
Ball died January 14, 1864; and he married 
November 29, 1865, Mary Jane Otis, daugh- 
ter of Benjamin B. Otis, of Lancaster. 

Mr. Ball was not a great reader, but what 
he did read was well digested. For fiction 
he cared little. Thackerary interested him, 
but theology and science attracted him more 
than anything else. When ill health forced 
him indoors for a season, experimental chem- 
istry was his resource, and he obtained some 
results of practical value. Geology always 
interested him, and he recognized that science 
as an essential aid in engineering. In the 
country he was a close observer, knew trees 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



22; 



and plants — not by the Latin name — but the 
habit of growth and characteristic of root, 
leaf, and fruit. As he walks to Marlboro the 
last of November, 1847, he notes the peeping 
of frogs and the full-blown dandelion by the 
roadside; and to the end he found keen enjoy- 
ment in the beauty of river and sky, of rock 
and woodland. In the pain and restlessness 
of his last hour he could still observe how 
"fine " the sky was. 

During the greater part of 1894 he enjoyed 
better health than for several years; but in 
November over-exertion developed new com- 
plications that brought him great suffering, 
and death came as a release on the 19th of De- 
cember. 



KRANK BABBITT, the proprietor of a 
large dairy and stock farm in Barre, 
was born where he now resides, August 
9, 1827, son of Dean and Lorania (Babcock) 
Babbitt. The Babbitt farm was cleared from 
the wilderness by Frank's grandfather, Bena- 
jah Babbitt, who came to Barre among the 
early settlers and spent the rest of his life 
here. 

Dean Babbitt, the father, was born at the 
homestead, December 14, 1780. He was a 
blacksmith, following that trade in connection 
with farming during the active period of his 
life; and he always lived upon this farm, 
which he inherited at his father's death. In 
politics he was a Democrat and in religious 
belief a Unitarian. He died July 26, 1866. 
His wife, whom he married in 1803, was born 
in New Braintree, Mass., August 5, 1783. 
She had thirteen children, all of whom lived 
to maturity; namely, Mary, Sophia, Jane, 
Lorania, Avery, Sewell, James, Susan, 
Charles, George, Harriet, Julia Ann, and 
Frank. Frank is the only one now living. 
The mother died May 11, 1859. 

Frank Babbitt acquired his education in the 
town schools of Barre. In his youth he 
learned the blacksmith's trade with his father, 
for whom he afterward worked until he suc- 
ceeded to the business. Besides conducting 
the smithy, he carries on general farming, 
dairying, and stock breeding, making a spe- 



cialty of raising fine oxen. The homestead, 
which he has improved by remodelling the 
buildings, is now considered one of the best 
farms in town. 

At the age of twenty-eight Mr. Babbitt first 
married Mercy Ellen Howe, a schoolmate. 
Born in Barre in 1835, she was a daughter of 
Eliphalet and Keziah Howe, representatives of 
a highly reputable family of this town. She 
died August 1, 1885, leaving one daughter, 
Kezzie E. The latter, born April 27, 1866, 
died April 25, 1887. Mr. Babbitt married 
for his second wife Mrs. Maria H. White, his 
first wife's sister and the widow of E. D. 
White, by whom she had two daughters — Mrs. 
Mattie L. Dunbar and Clara M. White. Po- 
litically, Mr. Babbitt is a Democrat. In re- 
ligious belief both he and his wife are Unita- 
rians. In 1893 he went to California to visit 
a sister, who at that time was the only sur- 
vivor of the other children of his parents. 



OSEPH W. TEMPLE, the treasurer of 
the Spencer Savings Bank and an ex- 
member of the legislature, was born in 
this town, February 17, 1833, son of 
Colonel Alonzo and Adeline (Ryder) Temple. 
The father, a native of Rutland, Mass., after 
settling in Spencer, followed the business of 
contractor and builder. Many well-known 
residences and other buildings have been 
erected by him. He was actively concerned in 
public affairs, having served as a Selectman 
and Assessor, and during the excitement 
caused by the Free Soil agitation in 1851 he 
was a member of the legislature. He was 
also a commissioned officer in the State mili- 
tia. Colonel Alonzo Temple died in 1884. 
Of his children, the only one now living is 
Joseph W., the subject of this sketch. 

Joseph W. Temple attended the graded 
schools and high school of Spencer, and com- 
pleted his studies with a two years' course at 
the Leicester Academy. At the age of fifteen 
he became a clerk in a Spencer store. When 
nineteen he joined in business with his 
brother, William H., forming the firm of 
Temple & Co., which conducted a thriving 
store for a number of years. Later he was in 



226 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



partnership with T. R. Whittemore, and still 
later he conducted the business alone. He 
was next engaged in business in Brookfield, 
under the firm name of Clapp & Temple; and 
in 1 86 1 he became a member of the firm 
Shumway, Temple & Co., boot manufacturers 
of Warren, Mass. Some time afterward that 
business was moved to Spencer, and was sub- 
sequently conducted under various firm names. 
He was also a member of the firm of Bullard, 
Boyden & Temple, boot manufacturers, for 
some thirteen years. In 1887 he was ap- 
pointed treasurer of the Spencer Savings Bank, 
in which capacity his business ability has 
since proved of much benefit to that institu- 
tion. 

Mr. Temple married Sibyl A. Green, of 
Spencer, a daughter of the late Josiah Green, 
who was one of the pioneers of the boot 
manufacturing industry in this town. He has 
rendered efficient public service as Town 
Clerk and Assessor, and he was a valuable 
member of the Committee on Mercantile 
Affairs while representing this district in the 
legislature of 1884. A Republican in poli- 
tics, he has served upon the Republican Town 
Committee. As an enterprising and progres- 
sive business man, he is widely known through- 
out this section of the county. 



'ACOB BOOTH, the president of the 
Soutbbridge Printing Company and a 
highly valued resident of Southbridge, 
son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Atkin- 
son) Booth, was born at Woonsocket, R. I., on 
September 8, 1836. The father, who was 
born in Yorkshire, England, in 1801, and 
came to this country in 1834, died in 1857. 
He was a millman. Helping to start factories 
in different places, it often became necessary 
for him to change his residence. Of his nine 
children, three are living — Isaac, William, 
and Jacob, all residents of Southbridge. 
William is in the coal business here. 

Jacob Booth received his education in the 
schools of Oswego, Onondaga, and Cayuga 
Counties, New York, to which State the fam- 
ily removed when he was very young. At the 
age of eleven he began working in the factory 



of which his father was then an employee. 
When thirteen years old he was apprenticed 
with Messrs. Gale & Eaton, of Syracuse, 
N.Y., to cabinet-making and piano finishing. 
During his apprenticeship, which lasted six 
years, he also learned ornamental painting and 
graining. Going then to Burrillville, R.I., 
he was there engaged in the painting and 
paper-hanging business until 1866, when he 
came to Southbridge. Here for the next 
twenty years he followed the same line of 
business, and was very successful. At the 
same time he was interested in the manufact- 
ure of furniture. Since 1884 he has been the 
president of the Southbridge Printing Com- 
pany, which is engaged in the manufacture of 
cotton prints, and has for some time been in- 
corporated. He is also a director of the Na- 
tional Bank of Southbridge, a member of the 
Board of Investment of the savings-bank, and 
a director of the Street Railway Company, the 
Southbridge Optical Company, and the Gas 
and Electric Light Company. 

Mr. Booth attends the Globe Congregational 
Church. He has served the town on the Board 
of Health and as an Overseer of the Poor. In 
politics he is a Republican. Fraternally, he 
is a member of Phoenix Council, R. A. His 
first marriage was contracted in 1873 with 
Miss Julia Vaughn, a daughter of Hubbard 
and Adeline S. (Pierce) Vaughn, of South- 
bridge. Born of the union was Carrie E. 
Booth, who is now the wife of H. R. Harris, 
and resides in this town. Mr. Booth's second 
marriage, which took place in 1887, united 
him with Jossie A., daughter of Henry W. 
Rice, of Brookfield, Mass. 




ALLEN DAY, a successful and pro- 
gressive agriculturist of Coy's Hill, 
Warren, was born April 4, 1835, on 
the homestead he now occupies, and on which 
his father, the late Captain Lyman Day, spent 
his entire life. His paternal grandfather, Na- 
than Day, came from Milford, Worcester 
County, to Warren in 1792, and, settling on 
Coy's Hill, bought the present homestead prop- 
erty, which was then heavily timbered. Na- 
than had cleared a large portion of the estate, 




JACOB BOOTH. 



PUBLIC 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



229 



and had been industriously employed for some 
time in otherwise improving it, when he died, 
December 4, 1849. 

Captain Lyman Day received a thorough 
agricultural training from his father. Having 
inherited the home farm, he cultivated it suc- 
cessfully throughout the remainder of his 
years. Taking a lively interest in military 
affairs, he commanded a company of local 
militia for several years. He married Eliza 
Allen, of Warren. Of their children, three 
are still living, namely: Elizabeth A., the 
widow of Dr. Lorenzo Warriner, late of War- 
ren, Mass. ; Laura A., the wife of Philip 
Spaulding, of Amherst, Mass. ; and E. Allen, 
the subject of this sketch. The father died 
April 14, 1867; and on July 30, 1850, the 
mother passed away. 

E. Allen Day completed his early studies at 
the Ouaboag Seminary. Under the able tui- 
tion of his father he became familiar with the 
various departments of general farming while 
yet young. Since he took possession of the 
paternal estate, he has met with merited suc- 
cess in his undertakings, and has been an in- 
fluential factor in developing the agricultural 
and industrial resources of this part of the 
county. He has served for a number of terms 
as a member of the School Committee of War- 
ren. In his political relations he is a straight- 
forward Republican. He was a charter mem- 
ber of the Warren Grange, to which he 
belonged for several years; and he is now a 
member of the West Brookfield Farmers' Club: 

On January 22, 1862, Mr. Day married 
Frances L. Adams, of West Brookfield, a 
daughter of William and 'Martha (Marsh) 
Adams, both of whom are now deceased. Her 
paternal grandfather, Ephraim Adams, settled 
in West Brookfield soon after the close of the 
Revolutionary War ; and her mother's father, 
Caleb Marsh, bore a Lieutenant's commission 
in the Revolutionary army. She has one sis- 
ter living, Susan F., the widow of Lemuel 
Fullam, late of West Brookfield. Mr. and 
Mrs. Day have three children — William L., 
Herbert A., and Alice F. Alice is the wife 
of Peter Kuntz, of New York City. Both sons 
reside on Coy's Hill, and are active members 
of the Warren Grange. William is a Past 



Master of the organization, and Herbert is the 
present secretary. Both parents are members 
of the Congregational church. 




RLTON D. RICHARDSON, a 

prominent dairyman of West Brook- 
field, was born in this town, Sep- 
tember 25, 1865. A son of Du- 
quesne H. and Julia (Allen) Richardson, he 
comes of English descent. The father, who 
was a native of Stockbridge, Vt., came to 
West Brookfield in 1859. Settling upon the 
farm where his son now resides, he tilled the 
soil energetically until his death, which oc- 
curred in March, 1895. In politics he sup- 
ported the Republican party. He was an 
active member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and for many years served it as a stew- 
ard. Julia, his wife, who was born in Brook- 
field, became the mother of six children, five 
of whom are living, namely: Clarence L., 
who resides in this town; Hattie L., the wife 
of Edwin M. Hawes, of Worcester; Herbert 
E., a school superintendent of Hampden 
County, Massachusetts; Myron A., who lives 
in West Brookfield; and Carlton D., the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

Beginning in the common schools of West 
Brookfield, Carlton D. Richardson completed 
his education at the Brimfield High School. 
Accustomed from his early boyhood to make 
himself useful about the farm when not in 
school, he was while still a youth perfectly 
competent to perform the duties devolving 
upon an agriculturist. Since he took charge 
of the homestead property, he has given his 
principal attention to dairying. He is practi- 
cal, progressive, and successful in his special 
line, having availed himself of the most im- 
proved methods in the treatment of dairy prod- 
ucts; and the gratifying results attending his 
efforts have gained for him a wide reputation 
as an expert agriculturist and dairyman. 

On November 26, 1SS9, Mr. Richardson 
was united in marriage with Amy J. Donne, 
of North Brookfield, a daughter of Hubbard S. 
Doane, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in 
the Review. Mr. Richardson is a member of 
the Worcester South Agricultural Society, a 



230 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



director of the Worcester West and Eastern 
Hampden Agricultural Societies, a member 
of the State Board of Agriculture, of the Mas- 
sachusetts Dairy Bureau, of the West Brook- 
field Farmers' Club, and of the Farmers' and 
Mechanics' Association of Spencer. He also 
belongs to the North Brookfield Grange, Pa- 
trons of Husbandry, of which he has been 
Master for two years, is a member of the 
Executive Committee of Ouabaug Pomona 
Grange, and is now serving his second term 
as a Deputy of the Massachusetts State Grange. 
His exhibits at the different fairs have long 
been noted for their excellence in all respects. 
In politics Mr. Richardson is a Republican. 




r^AMUEL WHEELER, an enterpris- 
ing general farmer, market gar- 
dener, and florist, of South Berlin, 
was born in this town, November 3, 
1 85 1, son of Samuel H. and Sarah (Holder) 
Wheeler. His great-grandfather was an early 
settler in Berlin; and the grandfather, Levi 
Wheeler, who was a lifelong resident of the 
town, followed agriculture here until his 
death, which occurred at the age of seventy 
years. Samuel H. Wheeler, the father, was 
born here, and brought up on the home farm. 
Besides farming he did considerable teaming 
during his active years, and also erected a sub- 
stantial dwelling, which is now occupied by 
one of his sons. He died at the age of sev- 
enty-eight. His wife, Sarah, who was a 
daughter of Joseph Holder, a custom shoe- 
maker of Bolton, became the mother of eight 
children, three of whom are living; namely, 
Mrs. Mary G. Hapgood, Samuel, and Henry 
A. The mother died at the age of fifty-six. 
Both parents were members of the Friends' 
Society. 

Samuel Wheeler, after attending the public 
schools, supplemented his general studies with 
a commercial course at a business college in 
Boston. For some years he worked in the 
shoe shops winters and spent his summers 
assisting his father on the farm. After his 
father's death he came into possession of a 
part of the property. In company with his 
brother he engaged in the cultivation of 



flowers, making a specialty of carnation pinks. 
They built hot-houses covering an area of ten 
thousand feet, which enabled them to carry on 
an extensive business. The partnership ex- 
isted for fifteen years, or until 1895, when it 
was dissolved; and Mr. Samuel Wheeler has 
since conducted the business alone. 

In 1872 Mr. Wheeler was united in mar- 
riage with Emily G. Bruce, daughter of Will- 
iam Bruce, a prosperous farmer of Hudson. 
He has five children; namely, Cora E., Her- 
bert L. , Edwin E., Marion G., and Bernice 
A. Cora E. married Arthur F. Brewer, a 
farmer of Berlin, and is the mother of one son,' 
Leon. Herbert L., who assists his father on 
the farm, married Delia Berry, and has one 
daughter, Mildred L. 

Mr. Wheeler has been chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen for several years, and has 
also served as an Overseer of the Poor and as a 
member of the Board of Health. Connected 
by membership with the Patrons of Husbandry, 
he has been Master of the local grange for 
three years, has served as Chaplain, Overseer, 
and Treasurer, and was for two years Overseer 
of the District Grange. He is widely and 
favorably known throughout this section as an 
excellent authority on all matters relating to 
floriculture, and from a small beginning has 
built for himself a successful business. He is 
prominently identified with the Society of 
Friends. 



MMONS E. CHAPIN, Town Treasurer, 
Selectman, and Assessor of Brook- 
field, son of George and Mary Cha- 
pin, was born in the town of Milford on Janu- 
ary 4, 1834. Both of his parents were natives 
of Milford. His father, who died in 1886, 
was at one time engaged in the manufacture of 
boots and shoes in his native town ; and his 
grandfather, Eli Chapin, resided there for 
many years. 

Emmons E. Chapin grew to manhood in 
Milford, and attended the public schools in 
that town, making the most of the slender op- 
portunities afforded him. His working life 
began at the age of sixteen years, when he 
went to Worcester. After remaining there 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 3i 



four years, he came to Brookfield, and entered 
the employ of Kimball & Robinson, boot and 
shoe manufacturers. There he continued until 
July n, 1864, when he enlisted in Company 
F of the Forty-second Massachusetts Infantry 
for the hundred days' service, and afterward 
did guard duty at Alexandria, Va. Upon his 
return to Brookfield he worked in a boot and 
shoe shop for a time. Subsequently he be- 
came a clerk for the firm of Crosby & Davis 
and still later a member of the firm H. V. 
Crosby & Co., of Brookfield. The latter con- 
nection lasted fourteen years. During ten 
consecutive years of the period he also served 
as Postmaster of the town. Retiring from 
the firm in 1881, he engaged in agriculture on 
his farm of forty acres, situated in Brookfield 
village. 

For twelve successive years Mr. Chapin has 
been a member of the Board of Assessors. He 
has also been a Selectman for several terms, 
and he is serving his second term as Town 
Treasurer. A comrade of Dexter Post, No. 
38, G. A. R., be has been its Quartermaster 
for several years. He is also a member of 
Hayden Lodge, F. & A. M., of Brookfield, 
and for the past twenty years its treasurer. 
Of his children by his marriage with Lucia A. 
Crosby, the only survivor is George H. Cha- 
pin, now the Town Clerk of Brookfield. The 
services rendered to the town by Mr. Chapin, 
Sr. , are fully and cordially appreciated, and 
have won for him the esteem and good will of 
the entire community. 




ILLIAM A. BARR, of Spencer, 
the founder of the well-known firm 
of William A. Barr & Son, and son 
of Hiram and Sal lie (Thompson) Barr, was 
born in New Braintree, Mass., July 15, 1835. 
His grandfather, John Barr, leaving Braintree, 
Mass., settled in New Braintree, where his 
three sons grew up. Hiram was a soldier in 
the War of 1812. Although he learned the 
carpenter's trade, after coming to Spencer he 
engaged in agriculture, and followed it during 
the remainder of his life. 

William A. Barr was only two years old 
when his parents came to live in this town, 



and hence his boyhood associations are all 
connected with Spencer. He spent his school 
days here, profiting to the extent of his ability 
by the instruction offered. When eighteen 
years of age he secured employment in the 
wire-mill of Myrick & Sugden in Spencer, 
where he worked for three years. Subse- 
quently for a short time he was employed in 
the tannery of Horace Warren, of Leicester. 
In 1859 he began the manufacture of shoe 
heels in Spencer. This enterprise, which 
was started with a very modest equipment, has 
gradually increased in proportions, so that it 
is now in a very flourishing condition. Sev- 
eral years since the building in which the 
business was begun was burned, after which, 
on the same site, on Wall Street, the present 
fine brick factory was erected. For a number 
of years after the fire Mr. Barr continued to be 
sole proprietor of the business. Eventually 
he took his son, Alton H. Barr, into partner- 
ship, forming the firm of William A. Barr & 
Son. Although the senior member of the firm 
retired some time ago, the firm name remains 
the same. 

The maiden name of Mr. Barr's wife, who 
is a native of Leicester, Mass., was Leonora 
Partridge. Of her three children, Alton H. 
and'Anella are living. In politics Mr. Barr 
is a Republican. For six years he was a Se- 
lectman of Spencer, and for one year of that 
period the chairman of the board. An es- 
teemed Mason, he is connected with the Ma- 
sonic lodge at Spencer. He holds the respect 
of his associates, not only because of his un- 
tarnished business record, but because of his 
persona] worth and companionable qualities. 




ENRY E. BABCOCK, one of Bolton's 
most prosperous farmers, son of 
David and Elizabeth W. (Walcott) 
Babcock, was born in this town, 
May 4, 1833. The grandfather, Josiah Bab- 
cock, a native of Fitchburg, Mass., and a 
tanner by trade, settled upon a tract of wild 
land in Bolton, where he cleared a farm, 
erected a tannery, and followed his trade in 
connection with farming. He died at the age 
of eighty years. David Babcock, who was 



: 3 2 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born in Bolton, after learning the shoemaker's 
trade, was engaged in that calling for many 
years in Bolton, where he acquired the repu- 
tation of a fine workman. He lived to be 
eighty-seven years old. His wife, Elizabeth, 
who was born in Stow, Mass., daughter of 
Silas Walcott, became the mother of seven 
children, five of whom are living; namely, 
Nathan, Henry E. , Edward B. , David M. , and 
John C. Of these the only one residing in 
Bolton is Henry E., the subject of this sketch. 
The mother lived to be eighty-two years old. 
Both parents were members of the Society of 
Friends. 

Henry E. Babcock completed his education 
at the Friends' Academy in Providence, R.I. 
After leaving school he learned the trade of a 
shoemaker, and was subsequently employed in 
the shoe shops of this locality until he was 
thirty-five years old. Then he took charge of 
the homestead property, and has since been 
engaged in dairy farming, shipping milk to 
the Boston market. He successively married 
Emily B. Upham, of Amherst, N. H., who 
died at the age of thirty-two years; Mary 
Southwick, of Millville, Mass., who died at 
thirty-six; Mary Searle, of Hollis, N.H. ; 
and Dorcas H. Aldrich, of Uxbridge, Mass., 
his present wife. His first wife had one 
daughter, Sarah E., who married William J. 
Woodworth, and now has three children — 
Albert S. , Zella, and Dorothy Woodworth. 

In politics Mr. Babcock is a Republican. 
He served for many years as chairman of both 
the Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor, and 
he was an Assessor for some time. For a 
number of years he has been officially con- 
nected with the Patrons of Husbandry, the 
Farmers' Club, and the Worcester East Agri- 
cultural Society. He attends the Friends' 
Meeting, and is at present the treasurer and 
one of the overseers of the society. 




REDERICK A. CURRIER, a promi- 
nent banker of Fitchburg, was born in 
Worcester, Mass., December 24, 1851, 
son of Festus C. and Joanna M. (Allen) Cur- 
rier. His paternal grandfather, Edward Cur- 
rier, was a Revolutionary patriot. He joined 



the American army in 1776, and acted as ser- 
vant to General Washington's staff until old 
enough to enter the ranks. He became a reg- 
ular soldier in 1778, and served to the end of 
the war. 

Festus C. Currier, above named, son of 
Edward, was born in Holliston, Middlesex 
County, Mass., October 6, 1825. An able 
financier, he was for some years the head 
of the well-known insurance and steamship 
agency of F. C. Currier & Son, with head- 
quarters in the Rollstone Bank Block, Fitch- 
burg, which agency he founded in 1868 on 
becoming a resident of Fitchburg. Under his 
able management the business grew to large 
proportions. In 1875 he was appointed to 
the State detective force by Governor Gaston, 
and was placed in special charge of the inspec- 
tion of manufactories and public buildings, 
his duties calling him to visit nearly all the 
factories in the Commonwealth. Upon the 
expiration of his term of office, without re- 
questing a reappointment he returned to the 
steamship business, which he combined with 
insurance, his insurance agency being for sev- 
eral years one of the largest in this part of the 
State. He has now given up insurance, but 
retains his interest in the steamship agency, 
handling railway and steamship tickets, for- 
eign drafts, and investment securities. He 
was for eight years or more a director in the 
Fitchburg Co-operative Bank. In 1891 he 
was one of the organizers of the Wachusett 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company, of Fitchburg; 
and he served as vice-president and superin- 
tendent of its agencies until the business was 
discontinued in 1896. He was thirteen years 
secretary of the Massachusetts Mutual Aid 
Society. For a number of years he was treas- 
urer of the Worcester North Agricultural So- 
ciety, and he served as its president in 1888. 

A Democrat in politics, he has been elected 
to a number of important offices. He served 
on the Board of Aldermen of Fitchburg in 
1874, 1875, and 1881 ; was a candidate for 
County Commissioner in 1874; and in 1880 
he polled a large vote as candidate for the leg- 
islature. In 1884 he ran on the Cleveland 
ticket as candidate for Presidential elector, and 
in 1886 he was nominated for Congress. In 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 33 



the subsequent election he ran far ahead of his 
ticket, and reduced the majority of one of the 
strongest Republican candidates in the State 
forty per cent. Personally as popular with 
the Republicans as with those of his own party, 
he was a dangerous opponent in the political 
field during the years of his public activity. 
His wife, Joanna, who was a daughter of 
Abram Allen, of Belchertown, Mass., died 
May 2, 1894. They had four children, three 
of whom died in childhood, the only survivor 
being Frederick A., the special subject of our 
sketch. 

Frederick A. Currier was reared in Hollis- 
ton, and there received his schooling. He has 
been a resident of Fitchburg since 1869, and 
may be said to have grown up in the insurance 
business. For a number of years he was the 
junior member of the firm of F. C. Currier & 
Son ; and he is now head of the firm of Cur- 
rier & Blanchard, with headquarters in the 
Rollstone Bank Building. He has for four 
years been president of the Fitchburg and 
Leominster Board of Underwriters. He was 
for six years connected with the management 
of the Fitchburg Opera House, and for five 
years he was secretary of the Wachusett 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company. Like his 
father, he is a Democrat, and is also very pop- 
ular with the members of the other great party. 
He was appointed Postmaster in 1887 by Pres- 
ident Cleveland, serving two years under his 
administration and retaining the office two 
years longer under President Harrison, thus 
filling out a four years' term, from 1887 to 
1 891. Upon his retirement a petition, bear- 
ing the names of seven hundred leading Repub- 
licans, asked for his retention as Postmaster. 
Mr. Currier was four years secretary of the 
Worcester North Agricultural Society. He 
was elected in 1896 secretary of the Fitchburg 
Co-operative Bank; and he still holds the 
office, this institution being one of the largest 
of its kind in the State. He served on the 
Board of Aldermen in 1896 and 1897. He is 
a member of Aurora Lodge, F. & A. M., of 
which he was secretary for twenty years; of 
Thomas Chapter, R. A. M. ; Jerusalem Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar; and of Hiram 
Council of Worcester. He also belongs to 



Mount Rollstone Lodge and King David En- 
campent, I. O. 0. F. He is on the Board of 
Trustees and is one of the Examining Com- 
mittee of the Worcester North Savings Insti- 
tution of Fitchburg. 

Of late Mr. Currier has taken a great inter- 
est in local historical matters. He was one 
of the originators and incorporators of the 
Fitchburg Historical Society, and has contrib- 
uted several papers to their historical collec- 
tions. His paper on "Postal Communication, 
Past and Present," brought out the following 
in the Fitchburg Daily Se7itinel : " Mr. Currier 
received Friday from the Post-office Depart- 
ment at Washington, through N. M. Brooks, 
superintendent of foreign mails, a copy of 
L' Union Postale, the official journal published 
monthly by the International Bureau of the 
Postal Union at Berne, Switzerland, dated 
September 1, 1895, the leading article of 
which is a review, with extended extracts, of 
a paper on the 'Postal Service,' read before 
the Historical Society of this city by Mr. 
Currier." The article, like all others in this 
publication, appears in French, German, and 
English, in parallel columns. Mr. Currier 
also received an autograph letter from the 
Postmaster-General of the German Empire 
and one from the Postmaster-General of Spain, 
complimenting his work. The following is 
from the Boston Herald: — 

"Mr. Frederick A. Currier is one of the 
most valued members of the Fitchburg His- 
torical Society, which has done and is doing a 
remarkably interesting and effective work in 
the lines upon which such organizations are 
usually active. He has prepared a number of 
important papers the last two years, which will 
appear in the regular volume to be published 
by the society before the holiday. But for 
private distribution he has caused to be 
printed two papers of especial importance, 
under the title of 'The Old Taverns and Stage- 
coach Days.' The longer titles of the papers 
are 'Tavern Days and the Old Taverns of 
Fitchburg' and 'Stage-coach Days and Stage- 
coach Ways. ' The papers make one hundred 
and eight pages of the usual book size, and are 
exceedingly interesting and rich in historical 
data. Mr, Currier has written quite a number 



234 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of other valuable historical papers. He has a 
genuine love for this sort of work, and his 
papers combine a great deal of unique infor- 
mation, interesting and pertinent 'color,' all 
presented in a charming literary style." 



rATIO MOORE, a farmer and 
airyman of New Braintree, son of 
Jonathan and Eunice L. (Moore) 
Moore, was born in Rutland, Mass., 
May 24, 1834. He comes of English origin. 
His paternal grandfather, also named Jona- 
than, who was probably a native of Brookfield, 
Mass., served as a soldier in the Revolutionary 
War. This Jonathan was for many years an 
industrious farmer of Holden, where he died, 
November io, 1843, at an advanced age. His 
farm, which was located in the southern part 
of the town, is now included within the water 
system of the city of Worcester. He was 
three times married, and he became the father 
of four children. These were: Patty, Jona- 
than, and Newell, by his second wife; and 
William, by his third wife. He was a mem- 
ber of the Congregational church. 

Jonathan Moore (second), who was born in 
Holden, November 20, 1805, resided in his 
native town until after his marriage. About 
the year 1830 he bought a farm in the northern 
part of the town of Rutland. Five years later 
he went to the Chamberlain farm in the south- 
ern part of the town, whence in 1863 he re- 
moved to what is known as the Bartlett farm, 
located in the eastern section. In 1870 he 
removed to Rutland Centre, purchasing a farm 
of thirty-eight acres, which he occupied for the 
rest of his life, and on which the large Mus- 
chopeague Hotel was erected. He died May 
16, 1878. Originally a Whig, he joined the 
Republican party at its formation. He was a 
member of the Congregational church. His 
wife, Eunice, whom he married May 28, 1828, 
was born in West Boylston, Mass., November 
5, 1806. Her children were: Horatio, the 
subject of this sketch ; two girls who died in 
infancy; and Mary, born July 13, 1841, who 
died August 22, 1845. The mother died Au- 
gust 6, 1879. 

Horatio Moore began his education in the 



public schools of his native town, and com- 
pleted his studies at the Wilbraham Academy. 
He assisted his father until he was twenty-two 
years old. Then he bought a farm in Rut- 
land, where he continued to till the soil for 
some twenty years. In 1876 he moved to his 
present farm in New Braintree, containing two 
hundred and seventy-five acres. Here, engaged 
in general farming and dairying, he keeps fifty 
head of cattle, some of which are full-blooded 
Durham; and he cuts one hundred tons of hay 
annually. Since he came here he has made 
various improvements upon the land and 
buildings. 

Mr. Moore has been three times married. 
On June 18, 1856, he contracted his first mar- 
riage with Ann M. Fletcher, who was born in 
Rutland in 1833, daughter of David W. and 
Sally (Esterbrook) Fletcher. She died in 
October, 1868; and on October 6, 1869, he 
married Lena Lovering, of Woburn, Mass., 
who died January 11, 1S74. His present wife, 
formerly Miss Emma A. Stone, whom he mar- 
ried March 23, 1876, was born in Rutland, 
December 13, 185 1, daughter of Stillman and 
Jeanette A. (Rice) Stone. Her father, a pros- 
perous farmer in his time, was born in Rut- 
land, July 14, 1816; and her mother was born 
in the same town, November 7, 1821. Still- 
man Stone served the town as Selectman, As- 
sessor, and Collector. In politics he was a 
Republican, in religious belief a Congrega- 
tionalist. He lived to be seventy-four years 
old. His widow is now residing in Worces- 
ter. He was the father of five children, 
namely: Stillman N. and Martha R., both of 
whom died at the age of thirty-three years; 
Merrick A., who married Rosamond A. 
Brooks, of Reading, Mass., on October 6, 
1875, and now resides in that town; Emma 
A., who is now Mrs. Moore; and Henrietta 
M., who is unmarried. Stillman N. Stone 
married Sarah J. Davis, of Barre, Mass., and 
left two children — Nelson T. and Pearlie. 
Martha R. Stone married Darius A. Putnam, 
and left one daughter- — Winifred J. Mr. 
Moore's first wife bore him three sons, 
namely: William F., an engineer, born March 
27, i860, who married Lulu P. Goodnow, of 
Rutland, and has one daughter, Gladys; Her- 




HORATIO MOORE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 37 



vey F. , born November g, 1862, now a mar- 
ketman in North Brookfield, who married 
Jennie Wellington, and has two children — 
Carroll F. and Mildred E. ; and Chester H., 
who died at the age of eleven months. By 
his second union he has one daughter, Ida 
M. , born December 25, 1871. Ida married 
E. L. Havens, of New Braintree, and has two 
children — Lucy M. and Stanley M. Havens. 

In politics Mr. Moore is a Republican. 
While residing in Rutland he was a member of 
the Board of Assessors. Besides serving in 
the same capacity in New Braintree, he has 
been a Justice of the Peace for a number of 
years. For two years he was the president of 
the Worcester County West Agricultural So- 
ciety, and he is now a trustee. He is also a 
trustee of the Worcester Agricultural Society 
and a vice-president of the Spencer Agricult- 
ural Society. He is a Past Master of the 
Rutland Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, and 
Mrs. Moore is a member. Also a member of 
the Congregational church, he serves it in the 
capacity of Deacon. 



61 HE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
J I ASSOCIATION of Southbridge, 
Mass., was organized December 31, 
1882. The movement of which that event 
was the result originated with a meeting of 
the young men of the Congregational church 
and their pastor, the Rev. Joseph Danielson, 
held in the latter part of the preceding No- 
vember, to organize a society for the benefit of 
the young of their own denomination. After 
discussing the project the conclusion was 
reached that an organization open to the young 
of all churches was the pre-eminent need, and 
a proposal to establish a branch of the Young 
Men's Christian Association was favorably 
received. With this purpose in view corre- 
spondence was at once opened with Charles K. 
Ober, the assistant State secretary. Then fol- 
lowed a meeting in the vestry of the Baptist 
church. A short time later, in the vestry of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, another meet- 
ing was held, at which Mr. Ober was present, 
and considerable enthusiasm was aroused. On 
the following Sunday announcement was made 



in the various churches of the town that a 
meeting would be held that evening in the 
Baptist church vestry to further consider the 
proposal. On this occasion the participants 
expressed great interest in the movement. 
The outcome was the meeting of December 31, 
1882, at which the Southbridge Young Men's 
Christian Association was formally organized 
by twenty-eight young men, many of whom are 
now among the representative business men of 
the town. From this inception the growth of 
the association has been rapid. It is now one 
of the finest equipped and most active organi- 
zations of the kind in New England. 

When organizing, the association adopted the 
constitution of the International Committee, 
and elected George W. Wells as president, 
F. M. Smith vice-president, W. P. Taylor 
secretary, and J. E. Clemence treasurer. 
Subsequently rooms for the use of the asso- 
ciation were secured in the block containing 
Edwards Hall. Here at a meeting held Jan- 
uary 6, 1883, forty-four new members were 
welcomed by the association. On January 15 
thirty-five more names were added to the mem- 
bership roll. The total membership now is 
three hundred. The growth of the society 
and the desire to extend its usefulness de- 
manded better accommodations; and at a 
meeting held July 28, 1884, it was voted that 
the profits from a festival, to be given at some 
future time, should be set aside as the nucleus 
of a building fund. To the small sum thus 
acquired were added from time to time such 
subscriptions as interested persons donated. 
On July 21, 1885, the association became a 
corporation under the laws of Massachusetts. 
Three years later, when the building fund 
amounted to twenty-five thousand dollars, the 
association felt warranted in buying the site 
of the present building, which was then valued 
at fifteen thousand dollars. Through the lib- 
erality of the people of Southbridge, a few of 
whom gave large donations, the treasurer's 
report at the close of the year 1891 showed 
the building fund to be forty-one thousand 
and twenty-one dollars. In the early part of 
that year a Building Committee, consisting of 
F. L. Chapin, George W. Wells, and Jacob 
Booth, had been appointed. Then at the 



2 3 8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



meeting held October 3, 1892, the association 
voted to authorize this committee to receive 
plans and specifications for the new building. 
The erection, which was in charge of H. P. 
dimming & Co., of Ware, Mass., was com- 
pleted in 1893. This beautiful edifice, three 
stories in height, is an ornament to the town, 
a credit to the architects and builders, and the 
pride of the association. On the first floor of 
the main building are six stores and the post- 
office, and in the annex are two stores below 
and a tenement upstairs. The reading-room, 
game room, parlors, and two lecture rooms (a 
large one and a small one) are also on the 
first floor. The second floor, devoted to the 
work of the junior department, has five class 
rooms. In these, under the instruction of 
competent teachers, various branches are 
taught, including book-keeping, arithmetic, 
penmanship, mechanical drawing, English and 
French, and stenography. On the third floor 
are the janitor's rooms and dormitories. 



ifREDERICK BRYANT, a prosperous 
farmer of Petersham and a veteran of 
the Civil War, was born on the Beaman 
place, so called, January 30, 1831. A son of 
Artemas and Mehitable (Wilson) Bryant, he 
is descended from Anraham Bryant, who re- 
sided at Reading, Mass., and was made a 
freeman in 1673. His great-grandfather, 
Samuel Bryant, came to Petersham in 1750, 
and bought fifty-six acres of land in the south- 
eastern part of the town. Samuel enlisted in 
Captain John Wheeler's company of minute- 
men, which belonged to Colonel Ephraim Doo- 
little's regiment; and he marched with it to 
Concord on April 19, 1775. After the Revo- 
lutionary War he purchased a farm which had 
formerly belonged to Captain Thomas Beaman, 
a Tory who guided the British troops from 
Boston to Concord, and whose estate was con- 
fiscated by the Massachusetts authorities. 
Joel Bryant, the grandfather, occupied this 
farm; and Artemas, the father, succeeded to 
its ownership. Artemas was an industrious 
farmer, and also followed the trade of currier. 
His wife, Mehitable, a native of Petersham, 
was a daughter of Major John Wilson. 



Frederick Bryant was educated in the public 
schools. Afterward he assisted his father in 
farming, and worked at the currier's trade until 
the summer of 1862. Then he enlisted in 
Company F, Fifty-third Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Volunteers, under Captain Mudge and 
Colonel John W. Kimball. With the rank of 
Corporal he served upon the Lower Missis- 
sippi. When the regiment was ordered to ac- 
company General Banks on the Red River 
expedition, he was detailed to guard duty at 
the camp in Algiers, La. Honorably dis- 
charged in September, 1863, he returned to 
the homestead farm. For the past twenty 
years he has been an Assessor, and the chair- 
man of the board for sixteen years. He is a 
comrade of Parker Post, No. 123, G. A. R., 
of Athol, Mass. 

Mr. Bryant married Mary Hapgood, a native 
of this town. Her great-grandfather, Asa 
Hapgood, was a member of the Committee of 
Safety at Barre, Mass., during the war for 
independence; and when forty-nine years old 
he enlisted in Captain Henry's company for 
service in Rhode Island. Mr. and Mrs. Bry- 
ant have five children, namely: Walter A., 
who married Carrie Felton, and has five chil- 
dren — Harry Felton, N. Agnes, Leroy, Al- 
bert Ray, and Charles F. ; Nellie W. , the 
wife of Herbert W. Gale, of Gardner, Mass. ; 
Winifred, who married Frank L. Gates, of 
that town, and has two children — Inez and 
Carl L. ; Charles H., a Boston merchant, who 
married Ada E. Bailey, and has two children 
— Alice M. and Herbert F. ; and John M. 
Bryant, who is engaged in business with his 
brother in Boston. 



^IERRE LEONARD COUILLARD, 
M.D., who for many years has been 




the leading medical practitioner of 
Manchaug, was born February 28, 
1850, at St. Martine, on the Chateauguay 
River in Canada, son of Joachim and Cather- 
ine (Doutre) Couillard. The Couillard fam- 
ily claims to be the oldest in Canada. Guil- 
laume Couillard, a French emigrant, was the 
first white settler to break the soil on the 
Plains of Abraham. Early in this century 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



239 



Dr. Couillard's grandfather removed from 
Quebec to St. Martine, and settled on a farm 
which has since been the home of the family. 
Joachim and Catherine Couillard had several 
children. Two sons, who are now deceased, 
were lawyers in Montreal. Besides Dr. 
Couillard, the only living son is Antoine, who 
is an agent for the Wilson Manufacturing 
Company of Montreal. A daughter, Alphon- 
sine, resides on the old home in St. Martine 
with the mother. Joseph Doutre, now de- 
ceased, who was a well-known attorney of 
Montreal, was a cousin of Dr. Couillard. 

After receiving his preliminary education 
in the schools of his native town, Pierre 
Leonard Couillard went to the College of St. 
Therese. He subsequently became a student 
in the College of L'Assomption, and gradu- 
ated at Victoria College, Montreal, as a phy- 
sician. After receiving his degree he settled 
at once in Mancbaug, where for the past 
twenty-three years he has watched over the 
health of the community. Many have been 
the hours of suffering which his ministrations 
have rendered less painful, and many the 
diseases which his skill has vanquished. 

By his marriage with Noemie Provost, 
daughter of Charles and Julie (Gaucher) Pro- 
vost, the Doctor became the father of three 
sons and two daughters. These are : -Edouard 
J., born April 6, 1881 ; Charles A., born Feb- 
ruary 7, 1885; Bertha Antoinette, born No- 
vember 20, 1886; Jean Jacques, born Decem- 
ber 15, 1892; and Noamie Elizabeth, born 
May 15, 1897. Edouard is now a student at 
the high school in Northbridge, and Charles 
is attending the grammar school in Manchaug. 
Dr. Couillard is a member of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society and of the Thurber 
Medical Society of Milford. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, and is now serving as secre- 
tary of the Democratic Town Committee. 




LIAS PARTRIDGE MORTON, agent 
of the Stevens Linen Works of Web- 
ster, where he is a prominent resi- 
dent, was born in Augusta, Me., on September 
7, 1842, son of Cornelius B. and Adaline 
(Partridge) Morton. He comes from Plym- 



outh Pilgrim stock, his first ancestor in this 
country being George Morton, who was born 
in England in 1585 and came to Plymouth, 
Mass., in 1623, on the ship "Ann." 

George Morton was married in Leyden, 
Holland, whither he had gone from England, 
to Julianna, daughter of Alexander Carpenter. 
The line of descent from George Morton to 
the subject of this sketch is through Ephraim, 
who was born in 1623 and married Ann 
Cooper; Eleazer, whose wife's given name 
was Rebecca; Nathaniel, who was born in 
1695, and married Mrs. Rebecca Clark Ellis; 
Ichabod, who was born in 1726 at Sandwich, 
Mass., and who married Deborah Morton; 
and Mordecai, who was born at Middleboro in 
1773, married Priscilla Bennett, and died at 
Winthrop, Me., in 1S35. Mordecai Morton 
was the father of Cornelius B. and the grand- 
father of Elias P. Morton. Ebenezer Ben- 
nett, father of Mordecai's wife, was one of 
the men who answered the alarm call on the 
day of the battle of Lexington, 1775, as was 
also Ichabod Morton. 

Cornelius B. Morton, son of Mordecai, was 
born at Middleboro, Mass., in 1807, and died 
in 1852. He was by occupation a shoe mer- 
chant. His first wife, Adaline, whom he 
married on June 23, 1832, was the daughter 
of Elias and Abagail (Chase) Partridge, of 
Paris, Me. Her grandfather, Eleazer, was a 
Revolutionary soldier. She died on Novem- 
ber 17, 1842, having been the mother of six 
children. Of these, Albert is now in South- 
ern California; Alfred is a retired Captain of 
the United States Army; and Edward and 
Frank are in business in San Francisco. 
Cornelius B Morton married for his second 
wife Mrs. Eliza Towle, of Augusta, and by 
this union had two children, namely: Ade- 
line, who is now the wife of Samuel T. Can- 
non, and resides in Augusta; and Charles, who 
also resides in Augusta. 

Elias P. Morton in his boyhood attended 
the schools at Brownfield, Me., in Oxford 
County. In 1861 he enlisted in Company A 
of the Eleventh Maine Infantry, under Cap- 
tain Pennell and Colonel Caldwell. In 
Washington, in November of that year, the 
regiment joined the Army of the Potomac, and 



240 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was assigned to the Fourth Corps, General 
Keyes commanding. Private Morton was pro- 
moted on January 20, 1862, to be Corporal. 
At Fair Oaks, Va., on May 31, 1862, he was 
wounded, but was able to rejoin the army 
again at Harrison's Landing on the 13th of 
the following July. On December 19, 1862, 
he was promoted to the rank of Sergeant, and 
on May 10, 1864, to that of Sergeant Major. 
He was mustered out of the service on Novem- 
ber 18, 1864. From February 1, 1865, to 
December of the same year he was employed 
as clerk in the Quartermaster's department. 
Returning to Webster, he assumed the posi- 
tion of clerk and paymaster for Henry H. 
Stevens in his linen crash manufactory at 
Dudley. Subsequently he was book-keeper of 
the concern until January, 1877, when he was 
appointed agent of the Stevens Linen Works, 
which is now a corporation. 

Mr. Morton and Arabella, daughter of 
Amory and Nancy S. (Lyman) Gamage, of 
Boston, were united in marriage on September 
6, 1866. Three children have blessed this 
union, namely: Maud, who was born on Jan- 
uary 4, 1872, and died on August 14, 1873; 
Frank Lyman, who was born on April 4, 
1875, and died on August 11, 1876; and 
Charles Edward, who was born on August 6, 
1877. Charles Edward Morton acquired his 
elementary education in the schools at Dud- 
ley, and then attended Phillips Exeter Acad- 
emy, where he was graduated in the class of 
1895. He is now a student in the medical 
department of Columbia College, better known 
as the New York School of Physicians and 
Surgeons. 

Mr. Morton is a member of various fraternal 
organizations, notably of the following: Na- 
thaniel Lyon Post, No. 61 ; Webster Lodge, 
F. & A. M.; Doric Chapter, R. A. M., at 
Southbridge; Hiram Council, R. S. M., at 
Worcester; Worcester County Commandery, 
K. T. ; Maanexit Lodge, I. O. O. F., at 
Webster; Wachusett Encampment at Worces- 
ter; and the Union Veterans' Legion of 
Worcester. He has held nearly all the offices 
in the Grand Army Post, and is one of its 
charter members. He attends the Universal- 
ist church. In politics he is a Republican. 



He has been Selectman, Town Treasurer, and 
a member of the School Board of Dudley. 
He is one of the Investment Committee of 
Webster Savings Bank and a member of the 
Textile Club of Boston. 



/^NHAUNCEY L. OLMSTEAD, the 
I \< official head of the Olmstead Quaboag 

vJ?_-- Corset Company of West Brook- 
field, which has its chief office at 
S3 Leonard Street, New York City, is actively 
identified with the business interests of this 
section of Worcester County. A son of 
Chauncey Olmstead, he was born August 18, 
1839, in Fairfield County, Connecticut. He 
comes of Dutch ancestry on his father's side 
and of Scotch on the mother's, side. The 
father, a Connecticut man by birth, served in 
the War of 181 2, and was afterward exten- 
sively engaged in the manufacture of coaches 
at Ridgefield, Conn., of which he was a well- 
known resident. 

Chauncey L. Olmstead was graduated from 
the high school at Wilton, Conn. When six- 
teen years old he entered his father's factory 
to learn the trade of a coach-maker, at which 
he served an apprenticeship of five years. In 
the ensuing year he became foreman of the 
shop. This position he soon after resigned to 
take a special- course of study in civil engi- 
neering. Going then to Toledo, Ohio, he be- 
came the junior member of the firm B. S. & 
C. L. Olmstead, civil engineers, which for 
three years did a large business in that por- 
tion of the Buckeye State. Ill health then 
forced him to give up that work; and, return- 
ing to Connecticut, he became a partner in 
the firm of J. Wilcox & Co., corset manufact- 
urers at Meriden. He continued with this 
company as their agent in New York City 
for eight years, at the end of which time, 
in 1875, he was admitted to the firm of 
Waterman & Mayer, corset manufacturers in 
West Brookfield. When this firm was dis- 
solved, the Bay State Corset Company was 
organized, with Mr. Olmstead as its presi- 
dent, a responsible position, which he held 
for several years. On December 1, 1894, he 
helped to organize the Olmstead Quaboag 



v»> 




wS^ 




CHAUNCEY L. OLMSTEAD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 43 



Corset Company, one of the largest and most 
prosperous of the kind in this part of the 
State, and of which he has since been the 
general manager. In politics Mr. Olmstead 
takes an independent course. 




AURICE P. CLARE, Selectman 
and Constable of the town of 
Webster, Deputy Sheriff of 
Worcester County, and a member 
of the firm of M. P. Clare & Co., undertakers, 
was born in Norwich, Conn., August 26, 1852, 
his parents being Michael and Ellen (O'Con- 
nor) Clare. Mr. Clare's ancestors came to 
this country from Ireland. The Irish family, 
descended from Norman-French stock, was 
founded by Richard de Clare, surnamed 
"Strongbow," who lived during the reign of 
Edward II., and who, for services rendered 
the English government, received a land 
grant located in Cork County. The estate, 
which has been handed down through succes- 
sive generations, is still in the possession of 
the Clare family. 

Michael Clare was born in Ireland on the 
ancestral place in 1796. When about eigh- 
teen years of age he came to America, and 
settled in Saratoga, N. Y. There he worked 
at railroad contracting for nearly twenty 
years. He came to Webster in 1867, and 
died there in 1879. His wife, Ellen, born in 
County Limerick, Ireland, in 1802, was a 
daughter of John and Ellen (Donovan) O'Con- 
nor. She came to this country in 1850, and 
was married in 185 1. The children of Mi- 
chael and Ellen Clare are: Maurice P., the 
subject of this biography; Ellen, who was 
born in Hadley, Mass., and is now Mrs. 
Heury King, of Webster; and Michael, now 
residing in Fitchburg, Mass., who is a fixer of 
woollen looms. 

Maurice P. Clare left Norwich when very 
young, and removed to Albany, N.Y. His 
elementary education was obtained in the pub- 
lic schools of that city and Troy. Coming to 
Webster at the age of twelve, he attended 
school here for the next four years. Then he 
went to work in Chase's woollen-mill. Llere 
he was employed for twenty-two years, ad- 



vancing to the position of foreman. He left 
the mill in 1892, and went into the undertak- 
ing business, which he has since followed. 
In April of the same year he was elected Se- 
lectman of the town, which position he has 
since held through successive re-elections. 
Since 1893 he has been Constable and since 
January of the same year Deputy Sheriff of 
the County. His appointment to the last- 
named position was received under Sheriff 
Robert H. Chamberlain. In politics he is a 
Republican. He is a member of Webster 
Lodge, No. 58, A. O. U. W., of which he 
was foreman one term. He is also a member 
of Division No. 11, A. O. H., of Webster, of 
which he was twenty-one years president and 
four years State president ; and the Chancellor 
of Webster Lodge, Knights of Columbus. 
He attends St. Louis Catholic Church. 

Mr. Clare was married on July 1, 1875, to 
Margaret, daughter of Peter and Mary 
(Caffery) Henry, of Oxford, Mass. The fol- 
lowing-named children have been born to him: 
Nellie, in 1876; John, in 1877; Margaret, in 
1879; Maurice, in 1882; and Margaret Mary, 
in 1885. Nellie, who was educated in the 
parochial schools of Webster, resides with 
her parents. She is a teacher of instrumen- 
tal music and the organist of St. Louis 
Church. Margaret died in infancy. The 
other children reside with Mr. and Mrs. 
Clare, the two youngest still attending 
school. 




which 



,ATHAN RICHARD GEORGE, one 
of the best known and most highly 
respected citizens of Mendon, the 
proprietor of Miscoe Spring, from 
is obtained the famous Miscoe Spring 
Water, was born in this town on November 
10, 1837, son of Nathan and Caroline (Thayer) 
George. He received his education in the 
public schools of Mendon and at Leicester 
Academy, and subsequently was employed for 
some years as an accountant in the Aaron 
Clafiin shoe factory in Milford. In 1863 he 
returned to Mendon, and formed a partnership 
with his brother, Julius A. George, with 
whom he was associated for five years in the 



244 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



manufacture of boots and shoes. Since 1868 
he has been engaged to some extent in real 
estate transactions, and has carried on the 
homestead farm. In politics Mr. George has 
always been a stanch Republican. His first 
Presidential vote was cast for Abraham Lin- 
coln. 

For a number of years past Mr. George has 
devoted considerable attention to developing 
the Miscoe Spring Water, which is now be- 
coming favorably known, not only in this 
county, but throughout the State. Miscoe 
Hill, which is an elevation of about six hun- 
dred feet above the level of the sea, is situ- 
ated in the town of Mendon, near the Upton 
and Northbridge lines. Its name is of Indian 
origin. From its summit there is no human 
habitation within a radius of a mile or more, 
except three small farmhouses. Near the 
summit and a half-mile distant from any 
house are several springs coming to the sur- 
face through a broken granite ledge and from 
such a depth that the flow and temperature of 
the water remain nearly the same summer and 
winter. The one from which the Miscoe 
water is obtained is on what was once a large 
farm belonging to Daniel Rawson. This 
farm, containing sixty-five acres of land, was 
deeded in 1821 to Richard George, grand- 
father of the present owner. About 1845 the 
farm buildings were torn down; and from that 
time to 1894, or about fifty years, it was used 
as a pasture for young cattle and horses, and 
allowed to grow up to wood, until now it is 
nearly covered. Since 1894 its use as a past- 
ure has been discontinued. The sixty-five- 
acre tract comprising the original farm is al- 
most entirely surrounded by wild land and 
pasturage, making an area of hundreds of 
acres of uninhabited and uncultivated land. 
The spring water has been known and used 
for at least sixty-five years, always being con- 
sidered exceptionally good. In the summer 
of 1892 several people who visited the local- 
ity many times during the season, to enjoy the 
exhilarating air and magnificent view to be 
obtained from the summit of the hill, drank 
freely of the water of this spring, and, feeling 
that they received much benefit from it, have 
continued to use it ever since. The opinion 



being formed that the water had some cura- 
tive properties, other people became inter- 
ested in it; and in a short time a local demand 
sprang up in the neighboring towns of Mil- 
ford, Hopedale, and Uxbridge, without adver- 
tising. 

In October, 1894, and again in December, 
1897, the water was analyzed by Henry Car- 
michael, Ph.D., of Boston. While the two 
analyses are substantially alike, the one of 
1897 shows that the water has not only re- 
tained its former purity but has become even 
purer. The situation of the spring, above and 
at a great distance from any source of con- 
tamination; the geological nature of the sur- 
rounding country; the depth of the spring, 
shown by the even flow and temperature of the 
water — -all tend to show it an ideal spring. 
Mr. George believes that by putting this pure 
and health-giving water within the reach and 
knowledge of his fellow-men he is doing a 
public service. He has opened an office in 
Boston, and Miscoe Spring Water is rapidly 
taking its place along side of Poland Spring- 
Water, which has for so many years held its 
own against all other spring waters. Mr. 
George has been Selectman three years and 
Town Treasurer six years. 

He married for his first wife a daughter of 
Genery Taft. By this union there was one 
child, a daughter named Rosa F. She was 
educated at the Framingham Normal School 
and at Wellesley College, and is now the wife 
of Arthur R. Taft, who is one of the progres- 
sive citizens of Uxbridge and at the present 
time Representative to General Court. For 
his second wife Mr. George married a daugh- 
ter of Joseph Blanchard, of Uxbridge. She 
has been the mother of four children; namely, 
Nancy C, Nathan R., Melissa B., and Her- 
bert J. Nancy C. George is a graduate of 
Wellesley College and a successful teacher in 
music, languages, and other branches. She 
was for three years superintendent of the pub- 
lic schools of Mendon. 

Nathan R. George, Jr., was graduated from 
Harvard College in the class of 1890, receiv- 
ing his diploma with a magna cum lande, and 
is now an instructor of mathematics in the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



received his master's degree from Harvard in 
1892. Melissa George completed her art edu- 
cation with three years' study in Berlin, Ger- 
many, and was subsequently for two years a 
teacher at Wellesley College and five years a 
teacher in Depauw University, Indiana. Her- 
bert George was educated at Phillips Exeter 
Academy and at Harvard College, and has 
been for the last six years in business in Bos- 
ton. He is now associated with his father in 
his plan for putting the Miscoe Spring Water 
on the market, and has charge of the Boston 
office, which is at 206 Devonshire Street. 



-jT^TENRY RUFUS STOWELL, of 
L^-l Athol, Mass., a successful manufact- 
\(s I urer, is a native of Petersham, 

^"""' another Worcester County town. 
He was born June 19, 1832, and was the eld- 
est of three children reared by his parents, 
Rufus and Anna (Allen) Stowell. His 
brother, Austin E., a resident of Tully, is in- 
terested with him in the woodenware busi- 
ness. Their sister, Mary E. , died at eigh- 
teen years of age. Rufus Stowell was born 
in Petersham, and spent his life there as a 
farmer. He died when but forty-seven years 
old. 

Henry Rufus Stowell remained on the farm 
with his parents until sixteen. Then, with a 
pack on his back, he left home and went to 
North Amherst, where he let himself on a 
farm for one season. The following year he 
did farm work in Deerfield. Later he secured 
a position as foreman of a mattress factory in 
Greenfield, which he held till he was twenty 
years old, when he left the factory. He pos- 
sessed unusual mechanical ability, and he 
invented machinery to be used in mattress- 
making, his observations while foreman hav- 
ing taught him what was needed in this line. 
Obtaining an order from a man named Rogers, 
who agreed to pay him a good price, he built 
some of these machines in Greenfield, and 
took them to Lafayette, Ind. Within less 
than a year Mr. Rogers failed, owing him 
seven hundred dollars, which he refused to 
pay. Mr. Stowell had been collecting bills, 
and, knowing of some nine hundred dollars 



that was due, he proceeded to collect it, hav- 
ing charged himself with the bills on the 
books, and then again demanded a settlement. 
Learning that he already had the money in 
his pocket, his employer caused him to be ar- 
rested; but, upon the advice of his attorney 
and the judge, he finally made the settlement 
which Mr. Stowell desired. 

Mr. Stowell next went to Quincy, 111., 
where he was engaged at one hundred dollars 
per month to erect machinery in a cotton fac- 
tory. He became a partner in the business, 
but after two years spent there he was obliged 
to leave Ouincy on account of the malaria. 
He returned to Massachusetts, and within a 
short time he opened a grocery store in Green- 
field. In the meantime he had married a 
niece of Joseph Pierce, who had a woodenware 
manufactory at Tully; and he soon took a posi- 
tion in Mr. Pierce's shop on contract at one 
dollar per day for two years. In a few years 
he was given an interest in the concern, the 
firm name then being Pierce & Stowell. Be- 
ginning without means, he felt that he should 
be happy had he but a thousand dollars. The 
business of the firm prospered. He had 
reached the coveted mark, and, passing it, 
was worth about five thousand, when, in the 
financial crash of 1857, his savings were all 
swept away. However, he courageously 
started again, made money rapidly, and passed 
the ten thousand mark that he had set before 
him as a coveted goal. 

Unfortunately, through a misconception of 
the revenue law, he had placed himself in a 
position where he was now called upon to 
make a heavy payment, which involved him in 
a debt of fifteen hundred dollars. Nothing 
daunted, he again returned to the old mill, 
bought lumber on time (though he found it 
hard to obtain credit of old friends, as it was 
generally reported that he was about to fail), 
and was soon doing a paying business; for he 
met his obligations exactly as due, even when 
forced to borrow money to do so, in this way 
regaining the confidence of the trade. A 
third time his property was wholly swept 
away, this time by fire; but his former con- 
duct in time of adversity was remembered, 
and his credit was not impaired. So he found 



246 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



it comparatively easy to get started again, 
and was soon making money. 

On his fiftieth birthday he removed to his 
present residence, on the beautiful eminence 
midway between the two villages of Athol and 
Athol Centre, and commanding as fine a view 
as any place in the valley. Here he has ex- 
pended thousands of dollars in terracing, dec- 
orating, and general improvement. But he 
was not to enjoy this home with all its com- 
forts unmolested, but must suffer an ordeal 
more severe than any that had preceded. 
Keeping a safe in his sitting-room, he had in 
it his valuable papers, notes, and bonds, to 
the amount of nearly fifty thousand dollars. 
His house was entered on Thanksgiving night, 
1889, and the safe broken open, and all these 
valuables stolen. 

To trace the burglars, secure their convic- 
tion, and recover his securities, was the work 
of thirteen months, the most trying period of 
his eventful life. He entered upon the task 
with his usual energy and determination. 
The story is full of incident and intense inter- 
est, but space precludes a review in detail. 
After futile efforts in the usual channels he 
did some searching on his own account, and 
secured one of the brightest young detectives 
in the country for an assistant. It was re- 
ported after some months that one of the 
notes had been presented to a Boston bank for 
collection. Clever detective work revealed 
where it was sent from; and through this the 
two principals in the breaking were caught, 
and one is now serving a ten years' sentence 
in the Charlestown prison. Mr. Stowell re- 
covered the greater part of the bonds, deeds, 
and other papers after a negotiation with 
parties in New York. He still keeps his 
woodenware factory. For years the firm was 
Pierce & Stowell, then H. R. Stowell until 
he came to Athol village, when he received as 
a partner Frank C. Warrick, under the style 
of Stowell & Warrick. The latter now has 
charge of the details of the business. 

In 1862, in response to a call from Presi- 
dent Lincoln for soldiers, the quota of his 
town lacking eight, Mr. Stowell, his foreman, 
and four other men enlisted; and his mill was 
closed for a year. They went out in Company 



F of the Fifty-second Massachusetts Regi- 
ment, under Captain Stone, and served in 
Louisiana. Only four of the six lived to 
come home. 

Upon his return from the West, Mr. Stowell 
married Lucina Houghton. She died in less 
than a year after, while they were visiting at 
her home in Petersham. He subsequently 
married Ellen A. Davis, daughter of Jarvis 
Davis, one of the leading men of Royalston, 
Mass. Three daughters have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Stowell, namely: Carrie L., wife 
of W. H. Jewell, an attorney in South Flor- 
ida, Mass.; Bertha L., wife of E. C. Gaynor, 
book-keeper for Stowell & Warrick, living at 
the parental home; and Delia E., unmarried, 
also at home. 

Mr. Stowell is a director of the Miller 
River National Bank and a trustee and vice- 
president of the Athol Savings Bank and 
member of its Board of Investment. He is 
one of the oldest members of Orange Lodge of 
Masons. 



DWIN A. HARRIS, formerly one of 
Clinton's most prominent business 
men, fourth child of Sidney and 
Sally (Kilburn) Harris, was born May 31, 
1837, at the Harris homestead in Clinton. 
His father, who was long and favorably 
known in this community, started the comb 
business here in 1823. A man of much force 
of character, he built up a prosperous busi- 
ness. 

The boyhood of Edwin, outside of school, 
was spent in his father's workshops, where he 
gained a thorough knowledge of the business. 
When he came to the years of manhood, he 
was fully prepared to assume the responsibil- 
ity of directing the establishment. His 
father practically gave up the management of it 
some years before his death, on account of his 
failing health; and it then passed into the 
hands of Edwin and his younger brother, 
George S. Harris. Upon the death of the 
latter, which occurred some years after that of 
his father, the full management of the busi- 
ness fell upon Edwin. 

From the start Mr. Harris was remarkably 




SAMUEL D. HARDING. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



249 



successful. Under his vigorous efforts the 
works rapidly increased in size and capacity 
until they became, it is asserted, the largest 
comb works in the United States. He be- 
lieved thoroughly in industry and in all it can 
do; and, though only a young man, he was 
able to show what earnestness and persever- 
ance can accomplish. The admiration of his 
fellow-citizens was won for him by his excel- 
lent business traits. His death on May 28, 
1875, when only thirty-seven years of age, 
was mourned by all who knew him, particu- 
larly by the residents of the village that bears 
his name. The funeral procession that fol- 
lowed his remains to Woodlawn Cemetery 
was one of the largest ever seen in this town, 
and well attested his worth. 

Mr. Harris's religious creed was the Uni- 
tarian. Movements for reform or progress 
found him in the vanguard of its promoters. 
He was one of the projectors of the Agricult- 
ural Branch Railroad, the opening of which 
created a new era in the growth of the town, 
and was on its Board of Directors. He was 
also a director of the First National Bank of 
Clinton. In politics he was a Republican. 
He was a leading member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity and of the Knights Templar, both of 
which organizations were officially represented 
at his obsequies. 

Mr. Harris was united in marriage Decem- 
ber 28, 1858, with Adeline K. Damon, of 
Fitchburg, Mass. Their children were: Her- 
bert Christopher, born April 28, 1862, de- 
ceased June 24, 1863; and Flora Kate, born 
July 20, 1865, deceased January 6, 1883. 




AMUEL D. HARDING, who was 
for many years prominent among the 
building contractors of Worcester, 
was born in New Sharon, Franklin 
County, Me., November 27, 1806. His par- 
ents were Jedediah and Lydia (Dyer) Harding, 
residents of New Sharon. Jedediah Harding, 
who was captain of a vessel, was lost at sea; 
His son, Samuel D. , was then only four years 
of age. The lad's educational advantages, 
therefore, were very limited. When he was 
fifteen years old he went to sea; but his 



mother feared that he would suffer his father's 
fate, and in deference to her wishes he gave 
up the study of navigation and learned the car- 
penter's trade, serving his apprenticeship in 
Mercer. The place was so small there was 
little building to be done; and he took ad- 
vantage of a chance to go to Leicester, Mass. 
There he was in the employ of Heman M. 
Burr, and enlarged his knowledge of the 
trade, learning fine grades of work. He 
proved an apt and careful artisan, and worked 
for Mr. Burr several years before starting in 
business for himself as a contractor and 
builder. The first house which he contracted 
for was in Leicester. The work was well done 
and other contracts rapidly followed. The 
city of Worcester offering a larger and better 
field, he moved thither, and soon established a 
reputation as a first-class builder. Many of 
the finest structures of that period were erected 
by him. He built the First Universalist 
church, on the corner of Main and Foster 
Streets, now known as Continental Hall; the 
old Episcopal church on Pearl Street, which 
was burned down ; and many business blocks 
and houses in city and country. Some of his 
money he invested in a large block on Front 
Street, corner of Trumbull, which stands to- 
day and is still valuable property. He had 
contracts for many blocks in the growing parts 
of the business section of Worcester. Makine 
his money honestly, he invested it wisely, so 
that it increased handsomely in value. In 
1880 he retired from business, and devoted 
the rest of his life to looking after his in- 
vestments. 

Mr. Harding was a typical self-made man. 
Starting without capital or education, thrown 
on his own resources in early boyhood, he 
worked his own way to influence and affluence, 
and won the sincere respect of his fellow-men. 
Broad-minded and a strong supporter of good 
government, he filled with ability a number of 
public offices. He was in the Common Coun- 
cil in 1852 and 1856; was Alderman in 1853 
-54, 1862, and from 1872 to 1877 inclusive; 
and he was chairman of the Water Committee 
which superintended the rebuilding of the 
Lynde Brook Reservoir after it broke away in 
1876. He was a member of the First Uni- 



250 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



versalist Church. Mr. Harding died April 9, 
18S9. 

In 1832 he was married to Eliza Burr, 
daughter of Heman M. Burr, his old employer. 
Five children were born of this union. Three 
died in infancy, and two — Edwin B. and 
Jennie — are now living. Edwin B. married 
Elmira A. Gould, and has had three children 
— Frances A. and Wilbur A. (deceased), and 
Wilton E. Jennie is the wife of Charles 
Goodwin, of Worcester, and has three children. 



DWARD WINSLOW LINCOLN, 
whose efficient services through a long 
term of years, ending only with his 
death on December 15, 1896, as chairman of 
the Parks Commission of Worcester, won for 
him the title of "Father of the Parks," was a 
native of this city, and was here a resident 
during the greater part of his life. He was 
born on December 2, 1820, in the old Lincoln 
mansion, which is now a part of the Lincoln 
House in Elm Street. A son of Governor 
Levi and Penelope Winslow (Sever) Lincoln, 
grandson of the Hon. Levi Lincoln, Sr., and 
on the maternal side a descendant of the sec- 
ond Governor of the Plymouth Colony, whose 
name he legally bore after 1846, he was a 
scion of good stock; and in his veins flowed 
some of the best blood of the old Bay State. 
His name, originally John Waldo Lincoln, 
the same as that of an uncle, was changed 
in his twenty-sixth year to avoid confusion 
of identity. 

His grandfather Lincoln was a descendant 
in the fifth generation of Samuel Lincoln, 
weaver, who came over from England and set- 
tled at Hingham, Mass., about 1637. The 
line may be thus shown: Samuel, 1 Samuel, 2 
Jedediah, 3 Enoch, 4 Levi, 5 Levi, 6 Edward 
Winslow. 7 

It is interesting to note that President Lin- 
coln was descended from the same immigrant 
ancestor, Samuel, of Hingham, weaver, the 
line being, say the historians: Samuel'; 
Mordecai 2 ; Mordecai, 3 who died in Berks 
County, Pennsylvania; John, 4 who went to 
Virginia; Abraham, 5 who settled in Ken- 



tucky; Thomas, 6 who married Nancy Hanks, 
and was the father of Abraham, 7 the Presi- 
dent. 

Levi Lincoln, Sr. , son of Enoch, was grad- 
uated at Harvard College in 1772. He was 
Attorney-General in President Jefferson's 
Cabinet in 1801, later was Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor, and afterward Acting Governor of 
Massachusetts; and he was appointed by 
President Madison an Associate Justice of 
the United States Supreme Court, but, owing 
to failing eyesight, declined to serve. From 
the close of the Revolution he was consid- 
ered, it is said, the head of the Massachusetts 
bar. His wife was Martha Waldo. He died 
in Worcester in 1820. 

His eldest son, the second Levi Lincoln, 
was graduated at Harvard College in 1802. 
He was successively Speaker of the Massachu- 
setts House of Representatives, Lieutenant 
Governor, a Judge of the Supreme Court. For 
nine years, 1825-34, he was Governor of the 
Commonwealth and from 1835 till 1841 a 
member of Congress. His brother, Enoch 
Lincoln, died in 1829, while Governor of the 
State of Maine. The Hon. Levi Lincoln, 
second, was also the first Mayor of Worcester, 
in 1848. His wife, Penelope Winslow Sever, 
was a daughter of William Sever, grand- 
daughter of William, Sr., and Sarah (Warren) 
Sever, and great-grand-daughter of James and 
Penelope (Winslow) Warren. James Warren 
was a lineal descendant in the fourth genera- 
tion of Richard Warren, who came over in 
the "Mayflower" in 1620; and his wife, Pe- 
nelope, was a daughter of Isaac Winslow, who 
was a son of Governor Josiah and Penelope 
(Pelham) Winslow and grandson of Governor 
Edward Winslow. There were five sons in 
Governor Lincoln's family — -Levi, William 
S., D. Waldo, George, and Edward. Levi 
Lincoln, third, went into the navy, and died 
after a long illness in 1845. William S. Lin- 
coln lived in Worcester most of his life, and 
was a highly honored citizen, serving in the 
war of the Rebellion, and leaving the army a 
General. D. Waldo Lincoln, the father of 
the present Waldo Lincoln, was killed in a 
railroad accident at New London while watch- 
ing the Harvard-Vale boat-race. He was at 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



J 5 r 



the time president of the Boston & Albany 
Railroad. George was in the Mexican War, 
and lost his life while trying to rally a de- 
moralized regiment at Baena Vista. 

Edward Winslow Lincoln was fitted for col- 
lege in the Worcester High School, and was 
graduated from Harvard in 1839 i n tne class 
with Edward Everett Hale, D.D. , and the late 
Dr. Samuel Eliot, of Boston. He then went 
to Alton, 111., and, after studying law in the 
office of his brother William, was there ad- 
mitted to the bar, and for a time acted as pros- 
ecuting attorney for the city. In 1845 he 
returned to Worcester; but, the outlook not 
seeming bright to him for a young lawyer, he 
gradually came to give much of his time to 
horticulture, of which he was very fond, and to 
journalism. His most interesting experience 
with a newspaper was during the Presidential 
campaign of 1848. A stanch Whig, he 
bought an interest in the JEgis, and vigor- 
ously advocated the election of Zachary Tay- 
lor, fighting a hard battle with the Spy, the 
Free Soil organ, edited by John Milton Earle. 
Mr. Lincoln also ran the Tme Whig, a purely 
campaign paper. 

Appointed Postmaster of Worcester by 
President Taylor in 1849, Mr. Lincoln held 
the office four years. Later he edited the 
Bay State, at first a daily and then a weekly 
paper, but not a long-lived one. During the 
Civil War he was a warm patriot, and in va- 
rious ways helped the Union cause. 

Politically, Mr. Lincoln was a Democrat 
after the split in the Whig party, and for 
most part consistently voted the straight 
Democratic ticket, on which he was frequently 
a candidate for office. He ran for Sheriff in 
1S61, and in 1888 he was a candidate for 
elector on the Cleveland ticket. He was fre- 
quently mentioned as a Democratic candidate 
for Mayor, but would never consent to the use 
of his name in that connection. In city poli- 
tics he was always non-partisan, supporting 
that candidate who he believed would best 
serve the interests of the city. In i860 he 
was elected secretary of the Worcester Horti- 
cultural Society. This office he held contin- 
uously until his death. 

Mr. Lincoln's most lasting service to his 



native city was his work as a member of the 
Parks Commission, of which he was the chair- 
man from its organization in 1870. Elm Park 
was his own creation; and later on, when 
Newton Hill was acquired by the city, Mr. 
Lincoln took its improvement and transition 
into his own hands, for which not only the 
people of to-day, but coming generations, may 
well be grateful. As his work in this capac- 
ity was entirely without compensation and 
actuated by the most entire disinterestedness, 
his suggestions to the city in regard to its 
park system carried much weight, and were 
uniformly complied with. Had he not given 
his time and taste to the city, it would have 
cost Worcester one hundred thousand dollars 
to hire a professional landscape gardener. 
But this item is small compared with what he 
saved by his success in making a little money 
go a long way. 

Mr. Lincoln is survived by his second wife 
and seven children. His first wife was Sarah 
Rhodes Arnold, of Providence, R.I. She 
died July 1, 1856, having been the mother of 
four children. Three died in infancy; and 
one, a son named John Waldo Lincoln, is a 
civil engineer, and settled on the Pacific 
coast. The second Mrs. Lincoln was before 
marriage Katharine Von Weber Marston, of 
Bristol, R.I. She is a daughter of the late 
Lieutenant Colonel Ward Marston, of the 
United States Marine Corps. Of the seven 
children born of this union, six are living; 
namely, Annie M., Mrs. Marion Lincoln 
Bogert, Marston, Adeline Sever, Helen, and 
Pelham Winslow. The youngest daughter, 
Miss Katharine Lincoln, died in 1S95. 




ILAS WHEELER, a retired busi- 
ness man of Hubbardston, was born 
in this town, April 12, 1S20, son 
of James Harvey and Lucy (Wood- 
ward) Wheeler. His first American ancestor 
was Thomas Wheeler, born in 1620, who was 
one of the early settlers of Concord, Mass. 
Adam Wheeler, great-grandfather of Silas and 
a native of Concord, came to Hubbardston 
from Rutland as early as 1766, and engaged 
here in farming. The records show that he 



'-5 2 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



held the office of Assessor for the years 1768- 
69 and 1 77 1, was a Selectman in 1768-69 and 
1783, and that he served as a Captain in the 
American army during the war for indepen- 
dence. He and his wife, Nancy, spent their 
last days in Hubbardston, and he died August 
24, 1802. His son, Silas, who was born in 
Rutland, January 26, 1763, followed agricult- 
ure during his active years, and died Novem- 
ber 3, 1826. He married Catherine Morse, 
who was born in Hubbardston, and died 
December n, 1824. 

James Harvey Wheeler, father of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was born in Hubbardston, 
June 21, 1786. He learned the millwright's 
trade, which he followed for many years, and 
was also interested in a chair factory in this 
town. He died February 1, 1864. He 
served as a Selectman for the years 18 17-18. 
His wife, Lucy Woodward Wheeler, who was 
born in Hubbardston, April 7, 1787, became 
the mother of six children, of whom Silas is 
the only one now living.' The others were: 
Betsey, born April 3, 181 1; Lucy, born 
March 14, 1813; James S., born June 13, 
1815; Julia, born May 24, 18 17; and Moses 
C, born February 16, 1825. The mother 
died December 29, 1862. 

Silas Wheeler acquired his education chiefly 
in the district schools. When ten years old 
he went to work for a neighboring farmer, 
with whom he remained five years, receiving 
for his services his board and clothing. Sub- 
sequently returning to the homestead, he as-, 
sisted his father until becoming of age. For 
some years afterward he was engaged in team- 
ing between Lexington and Boston, and later 
carried on a livery business at Barre, Mass., 
for about six years. Going then to Peters- 
ham, he followed farming and lumbering for 
about eighteen years, or until 1873, when he 
returned to his native town, and has since 
lived here in retirement. 

On December 25, 1845, Mr. Wheeler was 
joined in marriage with Amanda Rice, who 
was born in Hubbardston, November 28, 1821. 
Of this union there are three sons living, 
namely: Silas Theodore, born in Lexington, 
September 28, 1846; William H., also born 
in> Lexington, September 4, 1848; and Elwin 



C, born in Barre, July 25, 185 1. Silas 
Theodore Wheeler, who is a machinist of 
Worcester, married Mary E. Upton, of Peters- 
ham, and has one son, Fred E. Wheeler. 
William H. and Elwin C. Wheeler are carry- 
ing on mercantile business in Hubbardston 
under the firm name of Wheeler Brothers. 
The mother died September 17, 1886. Mr. 
Wheeler is one of the most highly respected 
residents of Hubbardston, where his genial 
manners make him universally popular. He 
has served with ability as Selectman and 
Overseer of the Poor for eight consecutive 
years, and in politics he is a Republican. He 
attends the Unitarian church. 




ILLIAM MAYO, a respected resi- 
dent of Westminster, formerly 
cashier of the Westminster Na- 
tional Bank, and at one time Representative 
to the legislature, was born in Orange, Mass., 
February 20, 1817, son of Stephen and Mary 
(Cheney) Mayo. His father was a prosperous 
farmer of Orange, and his mother was a 
daughter of Levi Cheney, of that town. 

Receiving his education in the public 
schools, he subsequently learned the carriage- 
maker's trade, which he followed for some 
years in Westminster, settling here in 1841. 
Later he was engaged for a time in painting 
chairs. On the organization in 1875 of the 
Westminster National Bank he was appointed 
cashier, the duties of which responsible po- 
sition he performed with ability for twelve 
years, when he resigned. He is one of the 
trustees of the Worcester North Savings In- 
stitution of Fitchburg. 

Mr. Mayo married Maria Goddard, daughter 
of Martin Goddard, of Orange. His children 
are: Emma, who married Milton S. Creed, of 
Gardner, and resides in that town ; and Ham- 
ilton, who married for his second wife Laura 
Merriam, of Leominster, Mass., is a resident 
of that town, and has two children : Winthrop, 
born in 1893; and Esther, born in 1895, 
Previous to the Civil War Mr. Mayo served as 
Selectman for several years, was Town Clerk 
twelve years, and Town Treasurer one year. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



: 53 



In 1859 he worthily represented the towns of 
Westminster and Gardner in the General 
Court. 



/§> 



USTAF C. H. STENMAN, a well- 
\ «jT known resident of Worcester, son of 

— Carl and Sophia (Majaux) Stenman, 
was born in Stockholm, Sweden, November 7, 
1S47. He received his early education in the 
public schools of Stockholm and at Ystad, in 
the State of Skone. Subsequently he studied 
in the island of Rugen and in Stralsund, Ger- 
many, where he spent three years. At the 
end of this time he went to sea, and for the 
following two years was a sailor, visiting in 
that time the West Indies and South America. 
After returning to Sweden by way of Ham- 
burg, he attended an agricultural college. 
The knowledge gained here enabled him to 
secure a place as foreman on a large farm in 
Germany, where he remained until 1871. 
Then, in October of that year, he sailed for 
America from Copenhagen in the steamer 
"Franklin" of the Baltic Lloyd line, hoping 
for a speedy passage and safe arrival. On the 
voyage the machinery broke down, and cholera 
carried off eight passengers, making orphans 
of twelve children aboard. When, compelled 
by lack of coal, the vessel put in at Halifax, 
it was placed in quarantine, and was subse- 
quently detained so long that not until the 
early part of December were the passengers 
and crew allowed to land. 

Coming at once to Worcester, Mr. Stenman 
entered the employ of Washburn & Moen, and 
for the three succeeding years remained in 
their wire factory. In 1874 he went to Bos- 
ton, where he obtained employment in the 
printing department of the establishment of 
James N. Osgood & Co. Three years later, 
however, he returned to his former position in 
Worcester. About 1880 he entered the em- 
ploy of William E. Rice, who had started new 
wire works, and spent the ensuing three years 
there. Then he was engaged in a mercantile 
business here until 1886 and in Manchester, 
N.H., until 1889, in which year he came back 
to Worcester. In the beginning of January, 
1898, he entered the employ of the large es- 



tablishment of Putnam & Sprague as Swedish 
salesman. It was recognized that his long 
business experience in Worcester and his 
many years of residence here gave him large 
influence and acquaintance among his country- 
men in the city. 

Mr. Stenman was married in 1872 to Emma 
Carlson. His only child, Sophia C. Stenman, 
is now employed in the capacities of stenog- 
rapher and typewriter operator at the Norton 
Emery Wheel Works. After attending the 
high and normal schools in Worcester, she 
graduated at Becker's Business College. Mr. 
Stenman is a charter member of Court Gen- 
eral Stark, F. of A., Manchester, N. H. ; of 
Court Harmony of the Worcester Order of 
Foresters of America; of Court Engelbrekt, 
F. O. A., now numbering over four hundred 
members, and of which he is Past Chief 
Ranger; and of the Knights of Sherwood 
Forest, the uniformed branch of the F. O. A. 
He also belongs to the Svea Gille, which is a 
social club composed entirely of Swedish 
members, and of which he was the presiding 
officer for two terms, and to the German 
Singing Society. Both he and his family at- 
tend the Episcopal church. 




ORMISDAS BELISLE, the manag- 
ing partner of the firm E. & H. 
Belisle, merchants of Manchaug, 
was born in St. Paul, Abbotsford, 
Province of Quebec, Canada, his parents being 
Oliver and Dometile (Sansoncie) Belisle. 
His grandfather, Michael Belisle, fought in 
the British army during the War of 1812, en- 
listing from St. John Baptist. 

Having obtained his education in the 
schools of St. Paul, Abbotsford, Hormisdas 
Belisle came to Manchaug. Here he worked 
in the mill for six years. At the end of that 
time he entered the employ of Michel Benoit 
as clerk in his store. After eight years spent 
in that position, during which time he gained 
a thorough knowledge of the general merchan- 
dise business, he started his present store, in 
company with his brother Eli. The latter, a 
contractor and builder in Worcester, is a 
silent partner in the firm of E. & H. Belisle. 



254 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He married Hermenegile Fifle, and has a fam- 
ily of two children. The store is one of the 
largest in the town of Sutton. Three assist- 
ants are employed, and the concern is in a 
most prosperous condition. Mr. Belisle has 
built up an excellent line of trade, and his 
many patrons have entire confidence in his 
fair dealing. His aim is to offer the best 
there is in the market at reasonable prices. 
Mr. Belisle attends the Roman Catholic 
church. In politics he is a Democrat. He is 
unmarried. 




EORGE P. PROUTY, formerly of 
the firm of Isaac Prouty & Co., incor- 
porated, boot and shoe manufacturers 
of Spencer, was born in the neighboring town 
of Rutland on September 12, 1831, son of 
Isaac and Mary A. (Goodell) Prouty. His 
father, born December 9, 1798, who was a 
well-known boot manufacturer of his time, 
founded what is now one of the largest boot 
and shoe factories in the world. In 1820 
Isaac Prouty started in the business at North 
Spencer in a small way. After some years he 
came to Spencer. For a long time only boots 
were made by him. The shoe department is a 
comparatively recent addition to his establish- 
ment. Since he brought the business into 
Spencer, it has been conducted under the 
name of Isaac Prouty & Co., which was incor- 
porated in 1894. In politics he was succes- 
sively a Whig and a Republican. A fine ex- 
ample of the self-made man, the people of 
Spencer were honored by his citizenship 
among them. He was a regular attendant of 
the Congregational church, and gave liberally 
toward its support. His death occurred on 
January 26, 1872. 

George P. Prouty resided in Spencer after 
he was two years of age. He went to school 
here, and also for two terms attended the 
Leicester Academy. At the age of ten years 
he began working in the factory. Having 
practically served an apprenticeship in all the 
different departments, he understood thor- 
oughly every detail of the business, and could 
detect at a glance any imperfect workmanship. 
Upon reaching his majority he was taken into 



partnership with his father and his brother, 
Lewis W. Prouty, who is also deceased. He 
retained his interest in the business through- 
out the remainder of his life. 

Mr. Prouty was married to Mary L. Bemis, 
of Spencer, and became the father of two chil- 
dren, John G. and Mabel L. Orthodox in 
religious belief, he attended the Congrega- 
tional church in Spencer. Not only did he 
derive distinction from being the son of his 
father, but from his personal worth and abil- 
ity, which were recognized both by his em- 
ployees and the townspeople at large. His 
death on May 1, 1898, was mourned as the loss 
of a representative man of the town and a 
leading factor in its industrial prosperity. 




ERBERT LINCOLN RAY, who 
keeps a general store and is the Post- 
master at Sutton Centre, was born 
in this town, January 28, 1868, son 
of George W. and Eliza (Bennet) Ray. His 
grandfather, Silas Ray, who was the first of 
the family to settle in Sutton, was a well-to- 
do farmer. George W. Ray, a native of this 
town, acquired considerable prominence in 
this section as an extensive dealer in hay, 
which he purchased from the farmers and dis- 
posed of in Worcester. He won a high repu- 
tation for integrity, had the sincere esteem of 
his fellow-townsmen, and was quite pros- 
perous. 

Herbert Lincoln Ray obtained his educa- 
tion in the common schools of Sutton, grad- 
uating from the high school in 1884. For 
some time after he was in business with his 
father. In 1890 he bought the store at Sut- 
ton Centre, which he has since conducted. 
He carries on a thriving business as a general 
merchant. His establishment, in which is 
also located the post-office, is the only depot 
of general goods in this locality. He was 
reappointed Postmaster in 1897. 

Mr. Ray married Lucia Hoyle, a daughter 
of Loren C. and Lois (Mascroft) Hoyle, the 
former of whom is a prominent citizen of Sut- 
ton. Mrs. Ray's father enlisted in Company 
E, Fifteenth Regiment, Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Infantry, which was known as the fight- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 57 



ing regiment, under the command of Captain 
Charles H. Watson. After serving for a 
year and a half with the Army of the Potomac, 
he was discharged on account of physical dis- 
ability. Upon regaining his health, he again 
entered the service, and was attached to the 
commissary department until the close of the 
war. He is a highly respected citizen and a 
comrade of the Grand Army of the Republic. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray are the parents of two 
daughters: Maud, born in 1890; and Flora 
E., born in 1893. Mr. Ray belongs to Sutton 
Grange, No. 109, Patrons of Husbandry, is a 
leader in all matters of interest to the young 
people of the community, and attends the 
First Congregational Church. 



T^JLEAZER SMITH, a leading agricultu- 
ral rist of Spencer, Mass., was born in Sut- 
""^"- — " ton, Vt., November 22, 183 1, son of 
John and Mary Smith, both of whom were na- 
tives of the Granite State. Mr. Smith's early 
years were spent on his father's farm in Ver- 
mont. He gained what instruction he could 
from the common school of his district, and 
has since increased his stock of knowledge by 
reading and observation. Like many another 
substantial and valued citizen, he is, in the 
main, self-educated. He was married in Ver- 
mont to Derinda Parker, who was born in the 
northern part of the State, daughter of Jona- 
than and Nancy Parker, and who died a quar- 
ter of a century ago. Her children number 
four, and are as follows: Charles H., who re- 
sides in Leominster, Mass. ; Melbern E. and 
Fred P., who reside in Spencer; and Amelia 
N., who is the wife of John Green, a well- 
known resident of Spencer. Mr. Smith's sec- 
ond wife, in maidenhood Emma M. Dicker- 
man, was born in Spencer. Her children are: 
Ada E., wife of Alfred E. Emerson; and 
Lewis E. Smith. 

Mr. Smith came from Vermont with his 
first wife early in the fifties, and secured em- 
ployment in Spencer as a farm laborer, work- 
ing by the month. Industrious and frugal, in 
a short time he managed to save sufficient 
money to rent a farm. Finally, in the six- 
ties, after some years of successful effort, he 



bought a farm, and since that time has been 
his own master. Mr. Smith, in addition to 
general farming, has carried on other lines of 
industry, and has been very successful. He 
bought a number of wood lots, from which he 
has cut and sold wood. For many years it has 
been his practice to purchase cattle and horses 
in Vermont, which he has sold in Spencer. 
Politically, he is a Republican. He is a 
member of the Farmers' and Mechanics' Asso- 
ciation of Spencer. 




LDEN BRADFORD PLIMPTON, a 
highly esteemed resident of Ouinsiga- 
mond village in the Seventh Ward 
of Worcester, residing at 27 
Whipple Street, was born in West Boylston, 
this county, on January 27, 1824, son of 
Colonel Simon and Betsy (Brigham) Plimp- 
ton. The family genealogy is traced back- 
ward in England through twenty generations 
who spelled the name Plumpton. 

Sergeant John Plympton, whose English 
birthplace and parentage are unknown to us, 
is said to have left his native country secretly 
on account of the opposition of his kinsfolk 
to his Puritanism. He became a member of 
the church at Dedham, Mass., in January, 
1643, and also joined the Artillery Company 
in Boston. In 1673 he removed to Deerfield. 
His son Jonathan was one of the slain at 
Bloody Brook in September, 1675; and he was 
himself taken captive by the Indians two years 
later, and, it is said, was burned at the stake 
in Canada. Mr. Alden B. Plimpton's grand- 
father, Jonathan Plimpton, was of the fifth 
generation in descent from Sergeant John 
Plympton. 

Colonel Simon Plimpton commanded a 
cavalry regiment of Massachusetts militia. 
After his death his widow married a second 
time, and by this union had one son, William 
A. Winter by name, who died in Fall River, 
Mass., on December 24, 1875, where he had 
been a minor civil officer. He left a son, 
William F. Winter, who is a teller in Pocas- 
set Bank, Fall River. Mrs. Winter died in 
1869, in the sixty-ninth year of her age. Mr. 
Alden B. Plimpton's own brother, Albert 



2 5 S 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Brigham Plimpton, is a carpenter of Lowell, 
a man of considerable education. He has 
lost his wife and his only son. 

Alden B. Plimpton was educated in the 
common schools and the academy, and at the 
age of seventeen he went to work for Jonas 
Ward, learning the cabinet-maker's trade. 
After serving an apprenticeship of three 
years he engaged with Partridge & Tabor, 
learning the finishing and upholstering busi- 
ness. The constant confinement indoors be- 
ginning to tell upon his health, he was obliged 
to give it up and secure outside carpentering 
work. Shortly after he associated himself 
with a Mr. Parker under the firm name of 
Plimpton & Parker, and engaged in the busi- 
ness of manufacturing sleighs, which he sub- 
sequently carried on for two years. One of 
his sleighs took the first prize in 1848 at the 
first mechanics' fair ever held in Worcester, 
and Mr. Plimpton still preserves the diploma 
awarded him. The same sleigh was afterward 
sold by him to a Boston man for a hundred 
dollars in gold. Upon discontinuing his 
manufacturing business Mr. Plimpton went 
to work again at carpentering, and was for 
four years in Whitinsville. Coming then to 
Worcester, he entered the employ of Ruggles, 
Nourse & Co., which has since developed into 
the well-known Ames Plough Company. 
Shortly after this he settled in his present 
home; and, as there were no street cars run- 
ning then, and the distance to his place of 
business was too far to be reached easily by 
walking, he took a position at the Washburn 
& Moen works near his residence. He re- 
mained there down to 1865, when he returned 
to the Ames Plough Company's works, in 
which he has ever since been a trusted em- 
ployee. 

On April 19, 1848, Mr. Plimpton was 
united in marriage with Lydia Eliza Pierce, 
daughter of Josiah G. and Lydia H. Pierce. 
The mother, who was a woman of great in- 
genuity and self-reliance, was a relative of the 
historian Bancroft. Both parents were well- 
read and intelligent people. They reared six 
of their seven children, three sons and three 
daughters. Those now living are: Mrs. 
Plimpton; Mrs. Fannie B. Gates, of this vil- 



lage, who is now seventy-seven years old; and 
Lewis Thorp Pierce, who resides in Millbury. 
The father died at the age of forty-five, and 
the mother in 1881, at the age of eighty-one 
years and six months, after thirty years of 
widowhood. Both are buried in Millbury. 
Mrs. Plimpton was born in Athol on the last 
day of October, 1825. When about thirteen 
years of age she went with her parents to re- 
side in Worcester, and from there went to 
Millbury, where she finished her school days 
at the academy. At seventeen she learned 
the dressmaking trade, at which she has al- 
ways worked more or less. Mr. and Mrs. 
Plimpton have had two children: George 
Henry, who died aged about eighteen months; 
and Hattie Maira Brigham, who died aged 
four months. The loss of their little ones is 
the only great sorrow that has marred their 
long and happy wedded life. 

When Mr. Plimpton built his house here, it 
was the only one on the street, and there were 
no other dwellings near it. His lot included 
about twenty thousand feet, and was valued at 
two hundred dollars. He began work on his 
house on the first day of August, 1856, and, 
though he had no assistance, had progressed 
so well that early in the following October 
he was able to move in, occupying three 
rooms, which were in partially completed con- 
dition. Through that winter he worked at his 
trade in the shop ten hours a day, and then 
came home to spend the rest of the day at 
work on his own house. Twice since it was 
built the house has been added to. He began 
without money, paying only a hundred dollars 
down, and going in debt to a loan association 
for four hundred dollars. Within eight years 
he had a full title to his property, and since 
that he has bought two acres of land adjoin- 
ing, and from this has sold to advantage sev- 
eral house lots. 

Mr. and Mrs. Plimpton have for twenty-five 
years been members and active workers in 
Plymouth Church of Worcester, and for a long 
time have been interested in the mission work 
here. Both have done much successful per- 
sonal religious work, and Mr. Plimpton has 
developed into an excellent public speaker. 

Mr. Plimpton and his wife had a silver 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 59 



wedding in 1873; and they have recently cele- 
brated in the same home their fiftieth anni- 
versary, the event being the occasion of warm- 
est congratulations from their many friends. 
The Worcester Gazette in speaking of it says : 
"A better preserved couple of their years than 
Mr. and Mrs. Plimpton it would be difficult 
to find. Mr. Plimpton can still do as hard 
work at the shop as ever, and is absent from 
his post of duty only on very rare occasions. 
In nearly forty years he has had but one seri- 
ous illness, and that kept him from work only 
ten weeks. His wife also enjoys excellent 
health, and is able to attend to all her house- 
hold duties without assistance. Both are 
great readers, and keep well informed as to 
the current events of the day. . . . Married 
life with them has been happy and successful. 
The way has been rough at times, but in the 
main smooth and pleasant. They still look 
upon the sunny side of life, and apparently 
have many happy and useful days before 
them." 



TT^HARLES C. DAWLEY, one of the 
I NX proprietors of the Westminster Bak- 
^Hs ery, was born in Wellington, 

Conn., March 8, 1847, son of 
George S. and Sarah (Leonard) Dawley. 
His parents were natives of Willington; and 
his paternal grandfather was James Dawley, a 
resident of that town. He pursued his ele- 
mentary studies in the public schools, and his 
education was enlarged at a boarding-school 
in South Windham, Conn. Learning the 
blacksmith's trade in Hampden, Mass., he 
followed it as a journeyman until opening a 
shop on his own account in Brimfield, Mass. 
Later he added carriage building and repairing 
to his business. In 1870 he moved to South 
Westminster, where he continued to carry on 
a shop until 1897. Then, coming to West- 
minster Centre, he in company with F. H. 
Battles purchased the Westminster Bakery, 
which they have since carried on under the 
firm name of Battles & Dawley. They have 
already built up a good business, making a 
specialty of manufacturing crackers; and their 
factory is equipped with improved machinery. 



Mr. Dawley married for his first wife Emma 
Dale, of Brimfield, who died in 1890. His 
present wife was in maidenhood Kate E. Mer- 
riam. He is the father of three children, all 
by his first union, namely: Alice, who mar- 
ried Monroe Towle, and has one son, Law- 
rence, born in 1897; C. Bertram, born June 
10, 1877, who is a book-keeper at the bakery; 
and George L. Dawley, born January 31, 
1879, wno i s now employed by the North 
Packing Company of Boston. Mr. Dawley 
is a member of William Ellison Lodge, 
I. O. O. F., of Gardner. 



ASON WATERS was born in Sutton, 
October 9, 1824, son of Stephen and 
Matilda (Carpenter) Waters. His ma- 
ternal grandparents were Simeon Car- 
penter, formerly of Attleboro, and Sally 
Blanchard Carpenter, of Sutton. Mr. Waters 
received education in the public schools of 
Sutton and at Smithville Seminary. After 
leaving school he was for several years en- 
gaged in teaching vocal culture; and, while 
preparing for this service in Boston, he inci- 
dentally fell into the society of the leaders 
of the anti-slavery movement, whose radical 
views and bold denunciation of a great evil 
had, doubtless, a great influence in shaping 
his subsequent career. From about this time 
up to the commencement of the war of seces- 
sion in 1861 his contributions to the public 
press on the political questions of the day at- 
tracted the attention of the thinking public. 

Although not seeking or expecting office, 
Mr. Waters was elected Representative to the 
legislature from the district comprising the 
towns of Millbury, Sutton, and Oxford in the 
years of 1862-63 and 1863-64. As a legisla- 
tor he has a record of which his constituency 
could justly be proud. It would hardly be 
looked for that measures having an important 
bearing upon the war would be proposed or 
championed by a "rural member," but he be- 
lieved that new members had duties to per- 
form as well as those who had grown old in 
the public service. Accordingly, not being 
a stranger to parliamentary procedure, with 
characteristic earnestness he advocated those 



260 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



measures which, he believed, would best sub- 
serve the public interest, 

During his first term of service the Military 
Committee unanimously reported to the House 
a bill appropriating five hundred thousand 
dollars, and authorizing Governor Andrew to 
expend the same in the purchase of small arms 
of the muzzle-loading pattern. Mr. Waters 
offered as an amendment that said arms 
"should be of such pattern as the Governor 
and Council should deem the best adapted to 
the service to which they are to be applied." 
The adoption of this amendment would permit 
the purchase of breech-loading arms, but 
otherwise such arms were ruled out of the pur- 
chase. Strange as it may seem in the light of 
to-day, the committee, consisting of five of 
the most talented men of the House, were op- 
posed to the amendment, and it was lost. 
The bill then went to the Senate, and in its 
passage through that body Mr. Waters's 
amendment was adopted verbatim. It came 
back to the House for concurrence, and a 
special assignment was made for its consid- 
eration. Now came the tug of forensic war. 
Speaker Bullock gave Mr. Waters permission 
to exhibit firearms on the floor of the House. 
Accordingly he obtained from time to time 
arms of various patterns, including the one to 
which the committee desired to confine the 
purchase, and stored them in the various lob- 
bies about the capitol. 

When the day came for the consideration of 
the question, the House was packed, many 
military men being present. The moment 
the Speaker announced that the appointed hour 
had arrived, the messengers rushed for the 
lobbies, and, bringing up the guns stored 
there, stacked them in the area in front of the 
Speaker's desk. Mr. Waters moved that the 
House concur in the amendment, and in an 
earnest speech proceeded to show why it 
should do so. In the midst of his speech he 
walked to the front of the Speaker's desk and 
challenged the committee to come forward 
and take a gun which they had recommended 
as the only arm to purchase, while he would 
take a breech-loading gun, and exhibit to the 
House their relative merits. No member of 
the committee accepted the challenge, and he 



proceeded to show the superiority of the 
breech - loading over the muzzle - loading 
weapon. Again and again did he reply to 
the objections urged by the different members 
of the committee, reading extracts from letters 
received from military men.* He stated to 
the House that he had witnessed the inspec- 
tion of breech-loading rifles by the inspectors 
of the British government months before, and 
that the State of Mississippi, through a New 
York house, had had breech-loading rifles 
made at the same armory before the war com- 
menced. The argumentative battle continued 
through the entire sitting, and at its close the 
aye and nay vote was doubted. A standing 
vote being ordered, it was found that the 
House had repudiated its former vote and 
adopted the amendment by an overwhelming 
majority. 

The Governor immediately appointed a com- 
mission to examine and test the various kinds 
of breech-loading rifles, and they selected the 
Spencer rifle. Just at the time that the 
papers announced the delivery of the first few 
thousand, the Union army was hard pressed 
in the vicinity of Chickamauga, and the Sec- 
retary of War requested Governor Andrew to 
turn these rifles over to the United States 
government to be placed in the hands of troops 
in the field. This was promptly complied 
with; and, the guns being sent to the army 
under General Rosecrans, they rendered such 
efficient service that the Secretary of War 
ordered all that the armory could turn out. 

Mr. Waters was returned to the House by 
his appreciative constituents, and to his sur- 
prise was placed upon one of the important 
committees of the legislature, that of Probate 
and Chancery. Petitions referred to that 
committee showed that abuses had grown up 
in the manner of giving notices to those in- 
terested in the final settlement of estates. 
After thoroughly investigating the matter he 
drafted, reported, and carried through a bill 
making it incumbent upon judges and regis- 
ters to require of all persons, having estates 
in their hands, to give prior to final settle- 
ment, where personal notice was not otherwise 

* Mr. Waters has now in his possession autograph letters from Gen- 
erals Thomas, Bumside, Rosecrans, Pleasanton, Hooker, Grant, and others. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



261 



ordered, a written or printed notice enclosed 
in a proper envelope, and mailed, postage 
prepaid, directed to each of the heirs, dev- 
isees, legatees, or their legal representatives, 
at their last known place of residence. This 
law saved thousands of dollars to the rightful 
possessors, who, by failure to get notice of 
court proceedings, lost their rights by the 
lapse of time limited by law to close settle- 
ments, and also saved much expensive litiga- 
tion. 

Mr. Waters introduced an order, which was 
passed, directing the Committee on Federal 
Relations, of which Peter Harvey, of Boston, 
was chairman, to consider so much of the 
Governor's message as related to the abroga- 
tion of the word "white" in the militia laws 
of the State, and thus render it possible for 
negroes to be enrolled in the militia. He 
was the only white person who appeared be- 
fore the committee to advocate the measure. 
A bill that was reported striking out the word 
"white " from the militia laws passed to en- 
actment. The wisdom of this measure is now 
a matter of history, and the magnificent mon- 
ument to the Fifty-fourth regiment opposite 
the State House is a silent witness of its re- 
sults. 

Mr. Waters introduced resolutions on the 
death of the venerable and brave Major- 
general Sumner, a native of Massachusetts. 
Upon these resolutions the learned and elo- 
quent Caleb Gushing made a masterly speech, 
in which he said: "It is a matter of deep re- 
gret to myself that I am unable to attend the 
sittings of the House constantly; and it is for 
this reason the more gratifying to me to 
happen to be here this afternoon, while the 
resolution in honor of the late Major-general 
Sumner, offered by the gentleman from Sutton 
[Mr. Waters], is under consideration. I 
thank him for introducing it. I most cord- 
ially concur in its object and opinion. It 
was clue to General Sumner as an officer of 
the army of the United States. It was due to 
him as a native son of Massachusetts." The 
resolutions were unanimously passed by a ris- 
ing vote. 

After the adjournment of the legislature, 
at the solicitation of the town he went to 



Washington to see what could be done in en- 
listing freedmen to fill the quota of Sutton 
under the last call made by the government 
for troops. On arriving at Washington he 
found that the Provost Marshal had issued 
such stringent orders as to effectually bar the 
enlistment of freedmen. Not to be baffled in 
his undertaking, he proceeded down the Poto- 
mac to Camp Corcoran, outside the District 
of Columbia, and filled the quota of Sutton 
by enlisting a fine body of middle-aged men, 
whose term of service in the regular army was 
about to expire. (One of these men was sub- 
sequently drawn by lot to be the executioner 
of the conspirators who took the life of Presi- 
dent Lincoln and attempted the murder of 
Secretary Seward and others.) For this ser- 
vice he charged nothing, but the town voted 
him a small gratuity. Meantime patriotic 
young men enlisted at home, which more than 
filled the town's quota. 

Some years after the war Mr. Waters be- 
came editor of the Fall River Daily Times, 
and his trenchant editorials in the columns 
of that paper are yet remembered. He most 
earnestly defended the course of Governor 
Bullock in nominating Judge Thomas for a 
seat on the bench of the Supreme Court, to 
which there was strong objection in certain 
quarters. He was the first to call the atten- 
tion of the citizens of that city to the impor- 
tance and feasibility of bringing to the city 
the waters of Wautuppa Lake, a body of 
spring water miles in extent, lying a short 
distance from the city. The magnificent sys- 
tem of water supply now enjoyed by that city 
attests to the wise foresight of its first advo- 
cate. 

His health becoming impaired by overwork, 
Mr. Waters left Fall River, and travelled as 
agent for several firms and as a correspondent 
of a prominent New England journal, writing 
under the nom de plume of "Observer." For 
three years he was general agent for the intro- 
duction and sale of the Lunatellus and Helio- 
tellus, new astronomical apparatus, being 
located at 17 Park Place, New York City. 
Subsequently he travelled somewhat exten- 
sively in the United States and Canada until 
the business depression became general, when 



262 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



he returned to his native town, in which he 
always claimed citizenship, never voting in 
any other place. Being a believer in purity of 
politics, he entered with zest into the discus- 
sion of political questions of the day, striving 
to suppress what he believed to be wrong 
and to elevate what he thought to be right. 
He is now serving the sixth consecutive year 
upon the School Board, of which he is chair- 
man. He introduced the novelty of an annual 
school festival, and is working assiduously to 
improve the scholarship of the pupils of the 
schools, in which his experience in his old 
profession becomes a great help. 

Mr. Waters never married, and, although 
very social in his nature, never became a 
member of any secret organization, believing 
that all men were his brothers, and that human 
sympathy should go forth to the distressed of 
every clime. 



7~^tHARLES S. COOLIDGE, a success- 
I \y ful farmer of Petersham and a mem- 
^^Hs ber of the Board of Selectmen, was 

born in this town, February 27, 
1857, son of Orasa and Susan C. Coolidge. 
His paternal great-grandfather, John Coo- 
lidge, who resided in Natick, Mass., enlisted 
in the Continental army on April 25, 1775, 
and served as a Corporal in Captain Benjamin 
Bullard's company, which belonged to Colo- 
nel Jonathan Brewer's regiment. Asa Coo- 
lidge, the grandfather, who removed from Na- 
tick to New Salem, Mass., was also inter- 
ested in military affairs, and served as Lieu- 
tenant in the State militia. Orasa Coolidge, 
the father, settled in Petersham. 

Charles S. Coolidge acquired his education 
in the public schools. Soon after the com- 
pletion of his studies he turned his attention 
to agriculture, working as a farm assistant in 
various places. When quite a young man he 
entered the employ of Walter W. Knight, 
whose farm he managed with ability for a 
number of years. At the age of twenty-nine 
he commenced operations on his own account; 
and he now owns a farm of one hundred and 
twenty-five acres, a considerable portion of 
which is covered with fruit trees, while the 



rest is used for the usual crops grown in this 
locality. Mr. Coolidge married Dora E. 
Amidon, daughter of Josiah C. Amidon, of 
Petersham. He has two sons: Burt C, born 
in 1877; and Roger E., born in 1885. Mr. 
Coolidge was formerly Superintendent of 
Streets. He has been a member of the Board 
of Selectmen for three years, 1895, 1896, and 
1898, and has served as Overseer of the Poor 
for three terms. His public services have 
been beneficial to the town, and he is both 
widely known and highly respected. 



(sTT RTEMAS MAYNARD, who owned 
fcjj and cultivated the Maynard farm in 
yJ|A Oakham for more than forty years, 
^-"' was born in this town, February 19, 
1809. He was the youngest son of Amasa and 
Mary (Parmenter) Maynard. The farm was 
cleared from the wilderness by his paternal 
grandfather, Francis Maynard, who came here 
from Rutland previous to or about the time 
that the name of the locality was changed 
from Rutland West Wing to Oakham. The 
place acquired its identity as a town in 1762, 
and the Maynard property has since remained 
in the family's possession. Francis Maynard 
was an industrious pioneer, and, as one of the 
founders of the town, accomplished much 
toward developing a thriving agricultural 
community. He married for his first wife a 
Miss Hubbard, of Rutland; and the maiden 
name of his second wife was Surviah Wright. 
He was the father of three sons and three 
daughters. 

Amasa Maynard, father of Artemas, was the 
youngest son. He was born at the home- 
stead, September 16, 1769. His entire life 
was spent upon this farm; and his active 
years were devoted to its cultivation, which 
he pursued diligently and with prosperous re- 
sults. He died March 26, 1831. Mary Par- 
menter Maynard, his wife, was born in either 
Concord or Sudbury, Mass., on January 24, 
1767. They had six children, namely: 
Francis W., born October 21, 1794; Abigail, 
born March 23, 1796; Ruth, born January 18, 
1798; Samuel, born November 15, 1799; 
Ezra, born November 23, 1804; and Artemas, 




FREDERICK W. RUSSELL. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



265 



the subject of this sketch. The mother at- 
tended the Congregational church. She died 
February 4, 183S. 

Artemas Maynard was educated in the dis- 
trict schools. The year after he attained his 
majority, the death of his father placed him 
in possession of the farm; and as a result of 
his energy many notable improvements were 
made, including the addition of more land 
and the erection of new buildings, the present 
residence having been completed about the 
year 1843. Like his father's, his whole life 
was passed at the homestead. He ably man- 
aged the property until his death, which oc- 
curred December 21, 1877, and was caused by 
an accident. He was an upright, conscien- 
tious man and a citizen of much worth to the 
community. Politically, he acted with the 
Democratic party. 

On December 26, 1836, Artemas Maynard 
was united in marriage with Caroline M. 
Taylor, who was born in Spencer, January 21, 
18 18, daughter of Roswell and Isabella 
(Hammond) Taylor. Her father was a native 
of Hadley, Mass., and her mother was born in 
Oakham. Roswell Taylor was a currier by 
trade, and followed his calling in various 
places, principally in Hadley and Northamp- 
ton. He died in 1867, having survived his 
wife, who died in 1830. They were the par- 
ents of five children: Caroline M., now Mrs. 
Maynard; Isabella; Ann Jane; Elizabeth, 
who resides in Illinois; and Mary. Mrs. 
Maynard has had three children, of whom the 
only one living is Laura Hunt Maynard, who 
resides with her mother. The others were: 
John Hammond, the first-born son, who died 
at the age .of two years; and William Henry, 
who died May 26, 1891. William Henry 
Maynard was a successful business man of 
Worcester, of the firm of Maynard, Gough & 
Co., publishers and printers, who made a 
specialty of hotel registers. He married 
Dora M. Perham. She died August 18, 1891, 
leaving two children, namely: William 
Henry, who died December 25, 1891, aged 
four months; and Marion, who died February 
25, 1896, aged nearly six years. 

The late Mr. Artemas Maynard left a farm 
of one hundred and thirty acres, the tillage 



portion of which is in a good state of cultiva- 
tion; and Mrs. Maynard and her daughter are 
now managing the property. They are both 
capable women, and are highly esteemed. 
They are members of the Congregational 
church, of which Mr. Maynard was an at- 
tendant. 



^Frederick william russell, 

p M.D., proprietor of the Highlands 
Hospital, Winchendon, Mass., was 
born in this town, January 27, 1845, son of 
Dr. Ira and Rowena (Greenwood) Russell. 
His father was born in Rindge, N.H., No- 
vember 9, 1814; and his mother was born in 
Winchendon, November 28, 1821, daughter of 
Henry and Sally (Woodbury) Greenwood, also 
of this town. 

His earliest paternal ancestor in America 
was William Russell, an Englishman, who 
settled in Cambridge, Mass., about the year 
1645. William Russell and his wife, Martha, 
had a family of nine children. Philip, their 
fourth son, was born in Cambridge in 1650, 
and he died February 7, 1730. He was a 
prominent citizen of that town in his day, 
serving as a Selectman in 1700 and 1701. 
He married Joanna Cutter; and she bore him 
six children, of whom William, second, the 
next in line, was the fourth son. The second 
William Russell and his wife, Elizabeth, set- 
tled in Lexington, and reared two children. 
Nathaniel, the younger of the two, was born 
in Lexington, and baptized February 23, 
1707. He settled at Littleton, Mass., in 
1728, and died there about the year 1763. 
He reared three sons, Nathaniel, second, 
being the eldest. 

Nathaniel Russell, second, Dr. Frederick 
W. Russell's great-grandfather, was born in 
Littleton, December 27, 1733. In 1762 he 
settled in Rindge, N. H., and took an impor- 
tant part in organizing the town government, 
serving as a member of its first Board of Se- 
lectmen and as its first Town Clerk. He was 
also the first regular schoolmaster there and 
a member of Captain Hale's company, which 
marched to Cambridge on April 19, 1775. 
For his first wife he married Abigail Gold- 



266 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



smith, a native of Littleton, Mass. ; and of 
that union there were nine children. He was 
married a second time to Anna Worcester 
Thayer, who was born in Littleton, August 
16, 1736. She died September 23, 1825, sur- 
viving her husband, who died January 1, 
181 2. They were the parents of five children, 
and Eliakirn was the eldest. 

Eliakim Russell, Dr. Russell's grandfather, 
was born in Rindge, March 1, 1 77 1. The ac- 
tive period of his life was devoted to agricult- 
ural pursuits. He married Sarah Converse, 
who was born in Rindge, March 15, 1776. 
They became the parents of twelve children, 
of whom Ira was the tenth-born and the fifth 
son. Of these the survivors are: Eliakim 
and Anna W. Grandfather Eliakim Russell 
lived to be eighty-nine years old, and his wife 
died at eighty-seven. They were members of 
the Congregational church. 

Ira Russell, Dr. Russell's father, prepared 
for his collegiate course at the New Ipswich 
Academy, and was graduated from Dartmouth 
College in the class of 1841. His prelimi- 
nary medical studies were pursued under the 
direction of Dr. Dixi Crosby, of New Hamp- 
shire, Dr. Abell, of Rindge, N.H., and Dr. 
Godding, of Winchendon. He was graduated 
from the medical department of the Univer- 
sity of the City of New York in 1844; and, lo- 
cating in Winchendon, he resided here until 
1853, when he moved to Natick, Mass., and 
acquired a large practice. At the personal 
request of Surgeon-general Dale, he in 1861 
accepted a commission as surgeon of the 
Eleventh Regiment, Massachusetts Volun- 
teers, and was later advanced in rank to that 
of surgeon of United States Volunteers. 
While serving with General Hooker's divi- 
sion, his executive ability attracted the atten- 
tion of the department, which ordered him to 
Baltimore for the purpose of organizing the 
Stuart Mansion Hospital; and in November, 
1862, he was sent to St. Louis, Mo., to equip 
the Lawson Hospital. During the winter of 
1862-63 he had charge of the wounded at 
Fayetteville, Ark. In February, 1863, he 
took charge of the general and post hospitals 
at Benton Barracks, that city, which under his 
direction became one of the largest in the ser- 



vice; and, joining the staff of General 
Thomas in December, 1864, he organized the 
Wilson General Hospital for colored troops at 
Nashville, Tenn. He also accomplished a 
great deaLof work in the way of scientific ob- 
servation, the records of which have secured 
a permanent place in medical literature, and 
at the close of the war he was brevetted Lieu- 
tenant Colonel for long and meritorious ser- 
vice. Returning to Winchendon in 1867, he 
continued in regular practice until 1875, 
when he established the well-known hospital 
called the Highlands, for the treatment of 
nervous and mental diseases, and was actively 
connected with this institution for the rest of 
his life. 

In politics he was originally a Whig and 
later a Republican. His professional ability 
was in many respects far above the average, 
and he possessed the essential characteristics 
of an honorable, upright, and whole-souled 
man. He married Rowena Greenwood, April 
24, 1844, and she became the mother of three 
children, two of whom are living: Frederick 
W., M.D., the subject of this sketch; and 
Sarah Jane, who is the wife of Erwin H. 
Walcott, and has one daughter, Mabel. Dr. 
Ira Russell died December 19, 1888. Mrs. 
Rowena G. Russell died in Natick, November 
28, 1875. They were members of the Con- 
gregational church. 

Frederick William Russell acquired his 
early education at the common schools and 
the high school of Natick. About the year 
i860 he joined Company H, Fifth Regiment, 
Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, being the 
youngest as well as the least in stature of any 
member of that body. When the regiment 
was ordered to the front, he was rejected on 
account of his youth, but in 1862 he joined 
the hospital corps, with which he served in 
Baltimore, Missouri, and Arkansas. After 
his discharge in 1863 he entered Yale Col- 
lege, but later went to Harvard University, 
from which he was graduated in the class of 

1869. His medical studies were completed 
at the University of the City of New York in 

1870. Commencing the practice of his pro- 
fession in Winchendon, he in 1S82 became 
assistant to his father, whom he succeeded 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



267 



as physician in chief and proprietor of the 
Highlands Hospital in 1888. The high rep- 
utation gained for this institution by its 
founder has been maintained by its present 
proprietor, who displays the requisite medical 
skill and practical sagacity for such a respon- 
sible position. 

On June II, 1872, he was united in mar- 
riage with Caroline Marvin, daughter of the 
Rev. A. P. and Caroline (Holbrook) Marvin, 
of Winchendon. Dr. and Mrs. Russell have 
had three children, namely: Rowena M., born 
February 6, 1881; Dorothy M., who was born 
June 9, 1884, and died December 9, 1889; 
and Walter M., born April 12, 1887. Dr. 
Russell has evinced much energy and public 
spirit in various directions. He assisted in 
securing the Winchendon water-works, and 
is at the present time serving as a Water 
Commissioner. He is president of the Elec- 
tric Light Company, president of the co-oper- 
ative and a director of the savings bank, the 
former of which he was instrumental in organ- 
izing, and he took an active part in establish- 
ing the Children's Hospital at Baldwinsville, 
of which he is a trustee. 

Politically, Dr. Russell is a Republican. 
For several years he served upon the School 
Committee. He is now chairman, of the 
Board of Health, and has rendered efficient 
services to the town in a public capacity. He 
is a member of the Natural History, the Med- 
ical and Psychological, and the New England 
Psychological Societies — all of Boston. He 
is also a member of the Loyal Legion, the 
Sons of Veterans, and the Grand Army of the 
Republic. Dr. and Mrs. Russell are members 
of the Congregational church. 




ILLARD F. LAWRENCE, a well- 
known business man of Leominster, 
was born in this town, June 25, 
1852, son of George and Eliza (Conant) 
Lawrence. George Lawrence, who was a me- 
chanic, was born at Lincoln, Mass., in 1829, 
and died in 1873. He was during the later 
years of his life employed in the piano case 
manufactory owned by J. H. Lockey, of Leom- 
inster. In politics he was a stanch Re- 



publican and a strong supporter of his party. 
His wife, Eliza, who was a native of Acton, 
is still living. Her father, who died at the 
age of eighty-eight years, served as a drum- 
mer in the War of 181 2. George Grosvenor 
Lawrence, a brother of Willard F., and three 
years his junior, married Sarah J. Fletcher, of 
Leominster. 

Willard F. Lawrence received a practical 
education in the public schools of his native 
town. After leaving school he began his 
working life in the grocery store of Kendall 
& Lawrence Brothers. He remained with 
this firm for ten years, after which he became 
book-keeper in a coal office. In 1887 he went 
into business for himself as a dealer in coal 
and hay; and in 1896 the Union Coal Com- 
pany, a stock concern, was organized, with 
Mr. Lawrence as the leading partner. The 
company has a branch office in Fitchburg. 
Mr. Lawrence is also a director in the Leom- 
inster Co-operative Bank and a member of 
the Investment Committee. 

He was married on December 8, 1873, to 
Ellen N., daughter of J. H. and Abbie Had- 
ley, of Leominster, and has two sons and a 
daughter — George Francis, Margery Newton, 
and Howard Grosvenor — who reside with 
their parents. Mr. Lawrence is a member of 
Wachuset Tribe, No. 41, Independent Order 
of Red Men; and of Monoosnock Council, 
No. 977, Royal Arcanum. 



T^HARLES G. STEARNS, M.D., a 
I V^ well-known physician and surgeon of 

vip^^ Leicester, is a native of Barre, 
Mass. He was born April 28, 
1850, son of Timothy L. and Eliza (Howe) 
Stearns, the former of whom was a native of 
Framingham and the latter of Shrewsbury, 
Mass. 

The early years of his life were spent in 
Barre. His education was begun in the dis- 
trict school of that town, and continued at 
Worcester Academy and the Fitchburg High 
School, where he was graduated in 1S71. In 
1874 he was graduated with honors at Am- 
herst College, being one of the first ten of 
Phi Beta Kappa men. After leaving col- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



lege he taught the West Springfield High 
School for one year, and was principal of a 
grammar school in the city of Fitchburg for 
three years. 

He entered the Harvard Medical School in 
1878, and, on receiving the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in 1881, settled in Brookfield, 
Mass., having previously, in 1880, served a 
term as house physician at Carney Hospital in 
Boston. After four years spent in practice in 
Brookfield he removed to Leicester, where he 
has since resided, and where he has built up 
and continues to enjoy a large and lucrative 
practice, having established a reputation for 
professional skill and integrity. He is a 
member of the Massachusetts Medical Society, 
in which he now holds the office of Censor for 
the Worcester District. 

Dr. Stearns was elected trustee of the 
Leicester Public Library in 1889, and has 
served continuously since that time, being 
now chairman of the board. He is also a 
member and secretary of the Board of Trus- 
tees of Leicester Academy. He is connected 
with the First Congregational Church of 
Leicester. 

Dr. Stearns married in 1881 Miss Carrie 
Willard, daughter of Joseph Willard, Esq., of 
Fitchburg, Mass. 



7T"\HARLES H. SHEDD, paymaster at 
I y the Lancaster Mills, Clinton, was 

\J«>. born in this town, July 24, 1853, 
son of Henry and Mary (Farns- 
worth) Shedd. His father was a native of the 
State of New Hampshire, and was the son of 
a brick manufacturer. His mother was born 
in Harvard, Mass., daughter of Samuel Farns- 
worth, of that town. 

Henry Shedd, who was an expert cotton- 
mill operative, in 1853 moved from Shirley to 
Clinton, where he became overseer of a de- 
partment in the Lancaster Mills. He re- 
mained there until his death, which occurred 
in 1883, at the age of fifty-seven years. He 
was a highly esteemed citizen, who took a 
deep interest in the general welfare of the 
community. It was his custom to spend 
much of his leisure time in hunting. In pol- 



itics he acted with the Republican party, and 
he was a member of the Unitarian church. 
His wife, Mary, became the mother of three 
children, of whom Charles H., the subject of 
this sketch, is the only survivor. One daugh- 
ter died at the age of eighteen, and another, 
Ella M., died in 1896, at the age of forty-six. 
The mother, who is still living, resides with 
her son. She attends the Second Advent 
church. 

Charles H. Shedd attended the common and 
high schools of Clinton; and, after finishing 
his studies at a private school, he spent three 
years in the drug business with L. W. Boyn- 
ton. He then became an assistant in the 
laboratory of the Lancaster Mills, where he 
remained two years. At the expiration of 
that time he entered the office, later became 
book-keeper, and was subsequently advanced 
to his present position as paymaster, the 
duties of which he has ably and faithfully per- 
formed for the last ten years. As the com- 
pany has a pay-roll of twenty-three hundred 
names, the position is a most responsible one, 
and calls for an accurate accountant. Politi- 
cally, Mr. Shedd is a Republican. He has 
been a member of the Board of Town Auditors 
for several years, was elected a Selectman for 
three years in 1897, and is clerk of the board. 
He is always ready to help advance the suc- 
cess of any worthy public enterprise. He is 
connected with Lancaster Lodge, No. 89, and 
is secretary of the Twenty Associates, a se- 
lect local organization. He is a member of 
the Unitarian church, of which he is treas- 
urer, and also a member of the Parish Com- 
mittee. 



KREDERICK T. CHASE, formerly a 
well-known and much esteemed resi- 
dent of Webster, was born in Pascoag, 
R.I., November 22, 1844, son of John and 
Elizabeth (Sales) Chase. His paternal grand- 
father, Joseph Chase, a native of Cape Cod 
and a farmer by occupation, married Isabelle 
Thomas, of Newport, R.I., who was a sister of 
Major-general Thomas, one of the four Major- 
generals appointed by Washington to com- 
mands in the Continental army. John, son of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



269 



Joseph, born in Douglas, Mass., in 1804, was 
engaged in the manufacture of woollens from 
1835 until his death in 187 1. By his wife, 
Elizabeth, who was a native of Pascoag, there 
were three children; namely, Oscar F. , Mari- 
ette, and Frederick T. 

Having received his education in the public 
schools of his native town, Frederick T. Chase 
came to Webster with his parents in i860. 
Subsequently entering his father's factory in 
this place, he soon acquired a thorough knowl- 
edge of the business. After his father's death 
he became the sole proprietor. In 1879 he 
found it necessary to enlarge the factory; and 
he was subsequently obliged to make other 
additions, until it had attained to three times 
its original capacity. The product was all 
sold in American markets. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Chase served 
his fellow-townsmen as Selectman, being the 
chairman of the board for five years. He also 
represented his district in the legislature of 
1876, serving as chairman of the Committee 
on Manufactures. An esteemed Mason, he 
was a member of Webster Lodge, the Royal 
Arch Chapter, Worcester Commandery, and 
a brother of the Scottish Rite. He attended 
religious services at the Universalist church. 
Married in 1867 to Miss Jennie S. Alton, of 
Webster, a daughter of S. and Emby Alton, 
he became the father of three children — John 
F., Frederick T., Jr., and Bessie F. His 
death, which occurred January 16, 1898, was 
widely regretted as that of a high-minded and 
public-spirited citizen. 




"ON. NATHANIEL LAFAYETTE 
JOHNSON, one of the most promi- 
nent residents of Dana, was born in 
this town, May 30, 1822, son of 
Nathaniel and Martha (Joslyn) Johnson. He 
is a lineal descendant of Solomon Johnson, 
whose birth took place about the year 16 17, 
and who in 1639 was residing in Sudbury, 
Mass. 

Solomon Johnson was one of the original 
settlers of Marlboro, which was set off from 
Sudbury in 1660; and he served upon the 
Board of Selectmen, 1661 to 1666. He was 



the father of five sons, one of whom, born in 
1640, was the first Nathaniel in the family. 
John Johnson, son of Nathaniel, first, and one 
of eight children, was born in 1679. He 
married Mary Plympton in 1707, and was the 
father of six children. Nathaniel Johnson, 
second, son of John, was born in 171 8. In 
1740 he married Sarah Forbush. Their chil- 
dren were: Joel, born October 31, 1743; 
Silas, born April 21, 1745; Sarah, born July 
26, 1748; Stephen, born June 6, 1 75 1 ; Cath- 
erine, born April 25, 1753; Mary, born Oc- 
tober 15, 1755; Susanna, born July 5, 1758; 
Persis, born May 2, 1760; Nathaniel, born 
January 12, 1762; and Aaron, born May 10, 
1763. 

Stephen Johnson, the third son, grandfather 
of the subject of this sketch, served as a sol- 
dier in the Revolutionary War; and shortly 
after the declaration of peace he settled on a 
farm in that part of Hard wick which in 1801 
came within the limits of the town of Dana, 
then incorporated. He was a man of good 
understanding and of many noble qualities, 
and was well and favorably known throughout 
this locality. He served as a Justice of the 
Peace for many years. He was a Universalist 
in religion, and was an intimate friend of the 
Rev. Hosea Ballou, who wrote his obituary. 
In politics he was a Jacksonian Democrat, and 
served as Representative to the General Court. 
He died December 31, 1834, > n his eighty- 
fourth year. His second wife, Elizabeth 
Mann, died March 20, 1820, aged seventy-one 
years. Their children were: Stephen, Jona- 
than, Nathaniel, Joel, John, Susannah, and 
two others. 

Nathaniel Johnson, third, the Hon. N. L. 
Johnson's father, was born in Dana, August 
2 3> l 7%7- Inheriting the homestead, he sub- 
sequently carried on general farming energeti- 
cally during the rest of his active period; and 
he and his wife passed their last days with 
their son in Dana. He served with ability in 
various town offices, was a member of the 
legislature in 1835, and was a Justice of the 
Peace. In politics he passed from the Whig 
party into the Republican ranks. He was a 
member of the Congregational church. He 
married Martha Joslyn, who was born in New 



270 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Braintree, Mass., August 14, 1791, daughter 
of Matthews and Abigail Joslyn. Her mother 
died September 21, 18 14, aged forty-seven 
years; and her father died March 19, 1840, 
aged seventy-three. Mrs. Martha Joslyn 
Johnson became the mother of four children, 
namely: Eliza M., who was born January 13, 
1 817, and died at the age of nineteen; Na- 
thaniel L. , the subject of this sketch; Char- 
lotte A., born April 12, 1823, who married 
Sylvester Lincoln, of Greenwich, Mass., and 
died at the age of thirty-seven; and Theolocia 
A., born April 20, 1824, who married Henry 
C. N. Howe, of Enfield, Mass., and died Sep- 
tember 18, 1898. Nathaniel Johnson, third, 
died May 15, 1867, and his wife died October 
24, 1883. 

Nathaniel Lafayette Johnson was educated 
in the district schools and at the New Salem 
Academy. In early manhood he taught school 
for some time, and also studied law. He sub- 
sequently acquired a practical knowledge of 
mercantile business by working as a clerk in 
Dana and in Worcester; and in 1844 he estab- 
lished himself in trade in his native town, 
carrying on a general store here for some 
years. His connection with the palm-leaf 
business began at about the same time. He 
followed it steadily until 1890, shipping his 
goods to the Western cities. His factory in 
Dana required an average force of eighty 
hands, and the business furnished employment 
directly or indirectly to about three or four 
hundred people. He was one of the organ- 
izers of the National Bank of Barre in 1863, 
was then made a director, which position he 
has held continuously to the present time, and 
he has been its president since 1883. He 
also assisted in organizing the savings-bank in 
Barre in 1869, was then made one of its vice- 
presidents, and is still a trustee of that insti- 
tution. For many years he was a director of 
the Athol National Bank. He is the owner 
of the old Johnson farm, which he has culti- 
vated since 1855. He has done considerable 
probate business, and settled many estates. 

On July 1, 1858, Mr. Johnson was united 
in marriage with Margaretta Harsha, who was 
born in Argyle, Washington County, N.Y., 
March 18, 1837, daughter of David and Nancy 



Harsha. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have one son 
living, John H., who was born December 9, 
1864, and is now a well-known lawyer of 
Worcester. Their other child, a son, Charles, 
born October 4, 1859, died January 4, 1861. 
John H. Johnson married Flora P. Barnes, of 
Sterling, Mass., November 19, 1889, and has 
one daughter, Marion, born March 6, 1897, 
and a son, Nathaniel L., born May 11, 1898. 
In politics Mr. Johnson is independent. 
Besides holding the important town offices, he 
served in the House of Representatives in 
1857, i860, and 1871, being chairman of the 
Committee on Claims in 1871. He was a 
member of the Senate in 1873 and 1874, being 
chairman of the Committee on Claims both 
years; and he was chairman of the Committee 
on Probate and Chancery in 1874. He served 
as Postmaster in Dana for seventeen years, was 
a Trial Justice several years, and for nearly 
forty years he has served as a trustee of the 
New Salem Academy. He is a member of 
the American Bible Society. Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson are members of the Congregational 
church. 



(^YLBERT SADLER, the chairman of the 
tjj Board of Overseers of the Poor of 
yJjA Upton and the Town Sexton, was 
^^ born in Upton on February 4, 1825, 
son of Ira and Sylvia (Wood) Sadler. His 
ancestors were the first settlers of the town ; 
and the first town meeting was held at the 
house of his great-grandfather, John Sadler, 
in 1735. John Sadler was Selectman of 
Upton from 1736 to 1745 and from 1748 to 
1752, Moderator in 1744, 1745, and 1752, and 
Treasurer in 1736, 1744, 1745, 1746, 1747, 
and 1750. He cleared the land in the south- 
ern part of the town, and built the old house 
in which some of the Sadler family have since 
lived. Albert Sadler's grandfather, also 
named John, enlisted in the Continental army 
in 1778, being one of six soldiers the family 
furnished for the defence of the colonies. He 
was Selectman in 1806, 1815, and 1816. His 
son, Ira Sadler, had six children besides the 
subject of this sketch. These, in the order of 
their birth, were: Mary A., who married 




CHARLES S. TURNER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



273 



Thomas J. Hall; Elbridge, who married An- 
geline Rathburne; Edwin, who died in in- 
fancy; Lucy, who became the wife of James 
Wiswall; Henry W., who successively mar- 
ried Caroline Walker and Laura Copeland; 
and Sarah W., who married Sidney Carpenter. 
After leaving the public schools of his na- 
tive town Albert Sadler learned boot-making, 
and worked at that trade until hand work 
therein was supplanted by that of machinery. 
After this he was employed in the straw shop 
of William Knowlton & Sons until his retire- 
ment, which occurred about two years ago. 
He was married in 1850 to Martha A. Pierce. 
His only daughter died in infancy. He has 
been many times elected to the Board of Over- 
seers of the Poor, of which he is now the 
chairman. The office of Town Sexton has 
been filled by him since 1887. In politics he 
is a Republican, and he is a regular attendant 
of the Congregational church. The Farmers' 
Club of Upton, of which he is a member, 
owes much to his wise advice; and he takes a 
warm interest in the annual fairs held under 
the auspices of that organization. 



1861. 



(£ffOHN P. ASHEY, of Leicester, a suc- 
cessful hardware dealer, plumber, and 
steam-fitter, is a native of Essex, Vt. , 
where his birth occurred, December 23, 
His parents, Lewis and Ellen (Lavio- 
lett) Ashey, who were born in Canada, re- 
moved, when he was an infant, to Swanton, 
Vt., where they carried on a farm, which was 
his home until he was fifteen. His education 
was obtained in the district school. In his 
sixteenth year he began learning the trade of 
a plumber, steam-fitter, and tinsmith with 
W. H. Blake (second), of Swanton, serving a 
three years' apprenticeship. He subsequently 
worked at his trade in Springfield, Mass., 
whence he went to Worcester, where he was 
employed as a journeyman for seven years by 
O. S. Kendall & Co. In 1889 he came to 
Leicester, and started in business for himself. 
Here he has built up a good trade in stoves, 
ranges, furnaces, general hardware, plumbing, 
steam-fitting, tin, sheet iron, and copper work- 



ing. He is a first-class mechanic, honest and 
conscientious in his dealings, and has a large 
patronage in the towns in the vicinity of 
Leicester. 

In 1883 Mr. Ashey was married to Delia 
Rivers, of Milford, Mass. They have three 
children; namely, Corinne D., Harold C. L., 
and Roy J. W. Ashey. 

Mr. Ashey is a Republican in politics and 
a member of the Republican Town Commit- 
tee. He is a member of Morning Star Lodge, 
F. & A. M.; Blake Lodge, No. 49, K. of P. ;. 
and Council No. 12, Royal Arcanum — all of 
Worcester. 




HARLES S. TURNER, who was the 
president and genera] manager of the 
Worcester & Nashua Railroad pre- 
vious to its lease by the Boston & 
Maine road, was born in Bethlehem, N. H. 
A son of Timothy P. and Priscilla (Bullock) 
Turner, of that town, he was a descendant of 
James Turner, one of the earliest settlers of 
the Granite State. The Turners came origi- 
nally from Wales about the year 1700. 
James Turner, who was born in Bernardston, 
Mass., was the third settler in Bethlehem. 
Of Timothy Turner's sons, the survivors are: 
James N., of Bethlehem, N.H. ; and Hiram 
N., of St. Johnsbury, Vt. His son Timothy 
N. died in April, 1898. 

On reaching his majority, Charles S. 
Turner went to Norwich, Conn., where he be- 
came employed in the railroad business. 
After serving some time as station agent, he 
became general agent of the Worcester & Nor- 
wich road, his office being in this city. He 
had spent fifteen years of active and success- 
ful service in this position when he was made 
the general superintendent of the road. Six- 
teen years later he was elected president of the 
consolidated Worcester, Nashua & Rochester 
road. Llaving filled this position in the 
most satisfactory manner for four years, he re- 
tired from active business. His brother, 
William PI. Turner, succeeded him on the 
Norwich road as superintendent. That was 
before the Union Station was built; and the 
trains came into and went out from the old 



274 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Foster Street station, which was used until 
the middle of February, 1877. 

Mr. Turner had lived a retired life since 
1883, devoting his attention to private affairs 
and attending to his real estate. For some 
time he had an office with the Adams Express 
Company, when that concern was located at 
375 Main Street. He was warmly interested 
in the Worcester & Shrewsbury road, also in 
the line of electric cars running on Foster 
Street; and he was a director of both corpora- 
tions. A man of foresight and of unusually 
sound judgment, his counsel was sought for 
not only by private people, but by public in- 
stitutions. He was a trustee of the Worces- 
ter Mechanics' Savings Bank, and had been an 
honorary member of the Worcester Continen- 
tals since 1876. He formerly attended the 
Salem Street Congregational Church, which 
has since formed a part of the new Union 
Church. Later he attended the Church of the 
Unity. He died at his residence, 13 Elm 
Street, Worcester, on August 8, 1897. 

Mr. Turner married Sarah Andrews, of Bos- 
ton, a daughter of John Andrews, of Boston, 
and sister of P. St. M. Andrews, the superin- 
tendent of the Norwich road. Mrs. Turner 
died February 28, 1887, leaving two daughters 
- Harriet I. and H. Gertrude Turner, both 
of whom reside at the family home in 
Worcester. 

A man of striking appearance and agreeable 
manners, the late Mr. Turner had as many 
friends as his quiet tastes would allow. 
While he did not care for society or public 
life, he was never known to shirk any rightful 
responsibility. As a railroad man he thor- 
oughly understood his business, and was com- 
petent to direct in any department of the 
road. 




|ERRITT N. HORR, of Spencer, 
Mass., a prominent contractor and 
builder, was born in the town 
of Prescott, Hampshire County, 
Mass., January 6, 1841, son of Nelson and 
Laura (Lumbard) Horr. Both his parents 
were natives of Prescott. The father was a 
farmer, who worked also at shoemaking. Mr. 



Horr grew to manhood in Prescott, where he 
remained until he reached his majority. He 
received his education chiefly in the public 
schools of that town, but also attended for 
a few terms the academy at New Salem. 
When about sixteen years old he assisted his 
father in building a new house, and at that 
time took such a liking to carpenter work that 
he decided to follow it thereafter. For sev- 
eral years he worked at the trade as a journey- 
man in Prescott and other places, until he 
understood it thoroughly, and also knew how 
to figure for estimates. Coming to Spencer 
over twenty-five years ago, he soon afterward 
began business for himself as a contractor and 
builder. He has met with excellent success, 
and has built many important structures. He 
keeps employed constantly from four to ten 
workmen, according to the season or the 
amount of work on hand. Besides contracting 
he also operates a lumber yard, in which he 
carries quite an extensive stock, both for his 
own use and for sale to customers. 

Mr. Horr married Mary Reed, and is the 
father of three children — - Laura N., Olive S., 
and Helen M. He is a member of the Con- 
gregational church. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. At all times he has the best inter- 
ests of the town at heart, and may be depended 
upon to give active support to any movement 
for the general good. 



c- 



HESTER N. JOHNSON, formerly 
an enterprising manufacturer of East 
Templeton, was born in Templeton, 
October 16, 1828, son of Steadman 
and Cynthia (Merritt) Johnson. His paternal 
grandfather was Enoch Johnson, a prosperous 
farmer of this town. Steadman Johnson, who 
was born in Templeton, March 20, 1802, car- 
ried on general farming for a number of years. 
He was later engaged in the manufacture of 
winnowing or fanning mills. 

Chester N. Johnson, after being associated 
in business with his father for some time, in 
1858 began the manufacture of toy wagons, 
wheel-barrows, and similar articles at East 
Templeton. From a small beginning the 
business expanded into large proportions. In 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



275 



1868 a spacious factory was built, and later 
additional room was made necessary by the 
increased demands of an enterprise that had 
developed into a most profitable industry. 
Mr. Johnson continued in business until 1891, 
when he retired. He died January 22, 1893, 
aged sixty-five years. His business foresight, 
enterprise, and integrity brought him a fit- 
ting reward; and his name is held in honor as 
that of one who did his full share in develop- 
ing the business resources of the county and 
in the employment of labor. He was equally 
respected as a man and citizen, and his many 
sterling traits of character were recognized 
and appreciated by a wide circle of friends 
and acquaintances. Politically, he was a Re- 
publican. 

Mr. Johnson married Mary A. Peckham, 
who was born in Petersham, Mass., July 6, 
1829. She survived her husband but a few 
months, her death occurring July 14, 1893. 
She left one daughter, Nellie M., who was 
born March 1, 1864. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson were members of the Baptist church. 
On May 20, 1882, Nellie M. Johnson married 
Joshua M. Greenwood, who was born in Bald- 
winsville, May 20, 1858, son of Levi Green- 
wood. She has had four children, namely: 
Lois A., who died at the age of ten years; 
Blanche J., who was born January 28, 1883; 
Levi C, who was born October 2, 1887; and 
Mary E., whose birth occurred August 2, 
1892. Mr. and Mrs. Greenwood reside in 
West Gardner, Mass. 




jUFUS CARTER, a respected citizen 
of Millbury, Mass., born in this town, 
November 24, 1823, is living re- 
tired from active pursuits at the 
home of his son, Henry W. Carter, who has 
one of the most extensive and best appointed 
farms in this locality. Mr. Carter traces his 
ancestry in the male line back to the Rev. 
Thomas Carter, the first pastor of the church 
in Woburn, Mass., of whom he is a descend- 
ant in the seventh generation. 

The Rev. Thomas Carter, who was born in 
England in 1610, was graduated at St. John's 
College, Cambridge, in 1629. Coming over 



to the Massachusetts Bay Colony, he was an 
inhabitant of Dedham in 1636, later was liv- 
ing in Watertown, and on November 22, 164.2, 
was ordained and settled over the church in 
Woburn, where he continued as pastor until 
his death, September 5, 1684. His widow 
survived him three years, dying March 28, 
1687. (Further account of the Carter family 
may be found in the History of Sutton, of 
which Millbury was a part until 181 3. See 
also Sewall's History of Woburn.) 

The line was continued through Thomas 
Carter, 3 and his son Eleazer, 3 who died in 
Sudbury, Mass., October 3, 1758, Joshua, 4 
the founder of the family in Worcester 
County, and Joshua, 5 to Rufus Carter, Sr., 6 
father of Rufus, the subject of this sketch. 
The elder Joshua, son of Eleazer, came from 
Woburn to Sutton in 1744, and from lands 
bought of Timothy Carter improved a home- 
stead, which, however, passed out of the fam- 
ily upward of sixty years ago. One of his 
three wives was Miss Elizabeth Lovell. The 
younger Joshua Carter, son of Joshua and 
Elizabeth (Lovell) Carter, was born on the 
Sutton homestead in 1759. He fought in the 
Revolutionary War, and for several years 
prior to his death, which occurred in 1848, 
drew a pension for his services. His first 
wife, Rachel Putnam, of Worcester, bore him 
three children, namely: Selma, born Febru- 
ary 7, 1787; Cimena, born October 19, 1789, 
who married Oliver Hall; and Rufus, Sr., 
born February 24, 1791. After the death of 
his first wife he married her sister, and by 
that union had four children — Jonathan, 
Sally, Aaron, and Newman, the latter of 
whom was born January 18, 1810. 

Rufus Carter, Sr., who died in early man- 
hood in 1824, was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits during his brief active career. On 
December 13, 18 19, he married Hannah 
Hall, daughter of Josiah and Mary (Marble) 
Hall, of Sutton. They had four children, 
namely: Mary, widow of the late Daniel G. 
Prentice, of West Millbury; Harriet and 
Hannah, twins; and Rufus, of Millbury. 
Hannah, who married Samuel A. Prescott, of 
Sutton, died at the age of thirty years. Har- 
riet died when sixteen years old. After the 



fjG 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



death of her first husband the mother married 
Cyrus Faulkner; and after his demise, May 2, 
1866, she spent her last days with her son 
Rufus. She died in the fall of 1889, at the 
venerable age of ninety-four years. The Hall 
family were noted for their longevity, Mrs. 
Faulkner's mother and also one of her 
brothers, Oliver Hall, having lived ninety- 
six years. 

Rufus Carter, son of Rufus, Sr., and Han- 
nah (Hall) Carter, completed his schooling 
at the Leicester Academy, and afterward 
worked on his present farm for his step-father, 
Cyrus Faulkner, until eighteen years old. 
Being then afflicted with a lameness of the 
knee that interfered with his active labors in 
the field, he secured employment with a shoe- 
maker at pegging boots, an occupation which 
he successfully followed twenty-five years in 
Millbury and Grafton. From 1866 until 
1890 he was engaged in agricultural pursuits 
on the farm on which he spent the greater 
portion of his early life. He has since re- 
sided with his son on Elmwood Street, as 
above mentioned. 

Mr. Carter is a Master Mason. He was 
formerly a strong anti-slavery man, and is 
now a stanch Republican. He has held vari- 
ous town offices, in all of which he has served 
with credit to himself and to the satisfaction 
of his constituents. He has been Road Sur- 
veyor, was a Selectman nine years, and for 
fifteen years was Tax Collector. 

In the spring of 1850 Mr. Carter married 
Sarah Ward, daughter of Jonas and Susan 
(Thurston) Ward. Mrs. Carter died January 
1, 1889, on the old farm. Her grave is in 
Central Cemetery, Millbury. She had been 
the mother of eleven children, eight of whom 
are now living; namely, Charles Sumner, 
Henry W. , Fannie Ermina, Mary E., Will- 
iam W., Lewis E., Jennie L., and James Al- 
lison. Anna Louise, the first-born, passed 
away at the age of thirteen years; Laura 
Emma, at nine; and Cyrus F., who was a 
physician in Boston, died in that city, leaving 
a widow. Charles Sumner Carter went from 
Millbury to Chicago, thence to the State of 
Washington, but is just now in Alaska, his 
wife being in Tacoma, Wash. Henry W., 



who owns the Sabin farm, formerly Elder 
Samuel Water's farm, and has a large whole- 
sale and retail milk trade in the city of 
Worcester, married Louette G. Griggs, and 
has four children — Addie Louette, Clara 
May, Henry Rufus, and Ruth. Fannie Er- 
mina is a teacher in Wakefield, Mass. Mary 
E. is the wife of Charles F. Mansfield, and 
has two children. William W\, with the firm 
of Cutting & Bardwell in Worcester, is mar- 
ried. Lewis E., a grocer in Wakefield, 
Mass., is married and has two sons — Minot 
Heath and Cyrus F. Jennie L. teaches 
school in Wakefield. James Allison Carter 
is in Boston with the firm of Dodge & Co., 
publishers in the interests of builders and 
architects and builders' materials, 



/STeORGE E. BRYANT, Postmaster at 
\ «jT Baldwinsville, was born in Temple- 

— ton, March 13, 1851, son of George 
W. and Althine H. (Day) Bryant. His 
father was a native of Templeton, Mass., born 
in 1824; and his mother was born in Win- 
chendon, Mass., in 1825. Ancestors on both 
sides served in the Revolutionary War. His 
paternal great-grandfather, Nathan Bryant, 
was a pioneer farmer of Templeton. Nathan 
Bryant (second), the grandfather, who was a 
lifelong resident of this town, also followed 
farming. He was prominent among his fel- 
low-citizens, and for a number of years served 
as Deputy Sheriff. The farm now owned by 
the subject of this sketch was originally the 
property of his grandfather, and was inherited 
by his father, George W. Bryant, who culti- 
vated it energetically from the time it came 
into his hands until his death, at the age of 
fifty-four years. Politically, the father was a 
Republican. His wife, Althine, lived to be 
seventy-three years old. Both parents were 
members of the Congregational church. 

George E. Bryant, who was the only child 
of his parents, was educated in the town 
schools of Templeton. He began business 
life as clerk in a store, and, becoming propri- 
etor of a general mercantile business in Bald- 
winsville at about the age of twenty-one, he 
has been engaged in trade here for some 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



! 77 



twenty-five years since. He was appointed 
Postmaster in 1885, held the position until 
1889, and was reappointed in 1893. For 
many years he has acted as a Justice of the 
Peace and Notary Public. He is also secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Baldwinsville Co- 
operative Bank and treasurer of the Hospital 
Cottages for children. He is a member of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. In re- 
ligious belief a Congregationalist, he has 
been clerk and treasurer of that society for the 
past twenty-five years. His homestead prop- 
erty has been in the possession of the family 
for at least three generations, and he owns 
one of the finest libraries in town. In poli- 
tics he is a Democrat. 



^fOHN VV. LAWRENCE, a prominent 
agriculturist of Warren, was born in 
North Brookfield, Mass., March 29, 
1840, son of David B. and Lucinda 
(Atwood) Lawrence. The father, who was 
born in Franklin, Mass., in the year 1800, 
resided in North Brookfield for a number of 
years. Moving from that town to Brimfield 
in 1842, he subsequently remained a resident 
of that place until his death, which occurred 
in 1865. His wife, Lucinda, who was a na- 
tive of North Brookfield, became the mother 
of eight children, three of whom are living: 
John W. , the subject of this sketch; Albert 
B., a hardware and iron merchant of Fitch- 
burg, Mass. ; and Nettie, wife of B. S. Jordan, 
of Framingham, Mass. 

John W. Lawrence was educated in the 
common schools of Brimfield, to which place 
he accompanied his parents when two years 
old. He was reared to agricultural pursuits, 
which he followed in that town some ten 
years. Subsequently becoming a member of 
the firm of Thomas Rice & Co., of Shrews- 
bury, for the succeeding six years he travelled 
to and from Kansas City, Mo., engaged in the 
purchase of hides for that concern. Since 
1879 he has resided upon a farm in Warren 
near the Brimfield line, where he owns two 
hundred and seventy-five acres of excellent 
land, and has carried on general farming ener- 
getically and successfully. He was a stock- 



holder in the Worcester County Cheese Com- 
pany, which was absorbed by the Worcester 
County Creamery, was for a number of years 
upon the Executive Committee of the last- 
named concern, and has been its president for 
the past seventeen years. 

Mr. Lawrence married Demaris Newton, 
daughter of Cheney Newton, of Brimfield, and 
has three children: Fred N. , a resident of 
Warren; Nellie M., wife of David Henshaw, 
of West Brookfield; and John C. Lawrence, 
who resides at home. In politics Mr. Law- 
rence is a Prohibitionist. While residing in 
Brimfield he served as Selectman and Asses- 
sor for two years, and he has served on the 
School Committee and as Overseer of the 
Poor in Warren. He is regarded as one of 
the foremost and most public-spirited men of 
the town, and as a capable, honest, and reli- 
able citizen he has the respect and confidence 
of the entire community. 



Wi 



ARREN J. MERRIAM, a promi- 
nent attorney, resident in West 
Boylston and having an office in 
the Five Cent Savings Bank Building at 314 
Main Street, Worcester, was born in South 
Carolina on July 19, 1865, son of John Q. A. 
and Emeline A. (Hutchinson) Merriam. His 
grandfather, John G. Merriam, was a planter 
in South Carolina, and lived in the South 
until shortly before the Civil War. He then 
came North, and located in Springfield, where 
he is still living. John O. A. Merriam was 
one of five children. He also came North in 
i860, and a year later, May 31, 1861, en- 
listed in Company E of the Tenth Massachu- 
setts Regiment of Volunteers. He was mus- 
tered out as a private, July 1, 1S64. Going 
to Enfield, Mass., when he was married, July 
28, 1864, and afterward to Ware, Mass., he 
there engaged in the manufacture of woollen 
goods for several years. His wife, Emeline, 
who was born in Enfield, was one of the seven 
children of Zina and Jemima (Gibbs) Hutch- 
inson. Her mother, Jemima, who was a na- 
tive of Bennington, Vt., died at the age of 
seventy-four. On her father's side Mrs. 
Merriam was of English descent. Both her 



278 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



parents were members of the Congregational 
church. 

Warren J. Merriam received a common- 
school education, and at an early age learned 
the woollen business. Upon coming to Ware 
he became a student at the high school, where 
he prepared for college. Entering Amherst 
College in 1885, he was graduated at that in- 
stitution on the 3d of July, 1889. The 
following year he taught at Nichols Academy 
in Dudley and the year after that in the high 
school at Sterling. Subsequent to this he 
came to West Boylston, and was for three 
years principal of the high school here. Dur- 
ing this time he began the study of law with 
Messrs. Sheehan & Cutting, of Worcester. 
After being admitted to the bar in 1895, he 
began the practice of his profession, taking an 
office at 314 Main Street, Worcester. Since 
beginning the practice of law Mr. Merriam 
has met with unusual success. He was for a 
year the local attorney of the Metropolitan 
Water Board of Boston, which was negotiat- 
ing with the people of West Boylston for their 
property, preparatory to constructing the great 
Wachusett Reservoir. Since severing his 
connection with the board he has been re- 
tained by many West Boylston people in the 
settlement of their claims against the Com- 
monwealth, resulting from the taking of their 
property for the reservoir. Mr. Merriam was 
counsel for Ida W. Briggs, who was indicted 
for murder of her infant, May 2, 1898. Mrs. 
Briggs was tried and acquitted at Fitch- 
burg, August 23, 1898. In politics Mr. 
Merriam is a Republican, in religious faith a 
Congregationalist. 



'OHN G. ALLEN, a prosperous dairy 
farmer of Hubbardston, was born where 
he now resides, June 19, 1831, son of 
Breck and Sally (Derby) Allen. The 
paternal grandfather, Ephraim Allen, who was 
a native of Shrewsbury, Mass., and came to 
this town from Rutland, cleared and improved 
the Allen homestead. He was a Selectman 
for the years 1798-99, 1809-10, and 1812-13; 
and during the last two years he was Repre- 
sentative in the General Court. In politics he 



acted with the Whig party. He was a Deacon 
of the Unitarian church. His death occurred 
in October, 1848. He married Lydia War- 
ren, who died in 1827. 

Breck Allen, the father, was born at the 
homestead, April 9, 1798. As a youth he as- 
sisted his father upon the farm. Afterward he 
and a brother jointly carried it on until 1S36. 
Then he took the entire management of the 
property, and tilled the soil successfully for 
the rest of his life. He died June 28, 1857. 
Like his father, he took an active part in town 
affairs, and was one of the first in this town. to 
join the Republican party after its formation. 
He was a prominent member of the Unitarian 
church. Sally, his wife, who was born in 
Lancaster, N. H., in 1797, had six children, of 
whom the only other survivor besides John G. 
is Mary, who resides in Chelmsford, Mass. 
The others were: Lucy, who died at the age 
of fourteen years; Calvin, who served in Com- 
pany H, Fifty-third Regiment, Massachusetts 
Volunteers, during the Civil War, and died 
August 14, 1863; Sarah, who died in 1895; 
and Lydia W. , who died in 1846. " The 
mother passed away on October 18, 1890. 

Having been educated in the district 
schools, at the Westminster Academy, and by 
private instruction, John G. Allen taught 
school for a short time, and then engaged in 
lumbering. At the death of his father he 
took charge of the homestead, where, with the 
exception of thirteen months, his entire life 
has been passed. Besides the home farm of 
one hundred and ninety-six acres, he owns out- 
lying timber land amounting to one hundred 
and seventy-two acres. The various improve- 
ments he has made upon his land and buildings 
place the Allen farm among the most valuable 
estates in this locality. He gives his chief 
attention to the dairy business, keeping from 
fifteen to twenty head of stock, cuts about 
thirty-five tons of hay annually, and produces 
butter of a superior quality. 

On December 16, 1858, Mr. Allen was 
joined in marriage with Hannah Greenwood, 
who was born in Hubbardston, August 24, 
1827. Her parents, Silas and Julia (Daniels) 
Greenwood, were natives respectively of this 
town and Hopkinton. Silas Greenwood was a 




JOHN G. ALLEN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



prominent farmer of Hubbardston in his day 
and a leading spirit in public affairs, serving 
as a Selectman for ten years, and representing 
his district in the legislature of 1835. Late 
in life he acted with the Republican party in 
politics. In religious belief he was a Unita- 
rian. He died March 12, 1857, and his wife 
died January 9, 1864. Mr. and Mrs. Allen 
are the parents of two children: Abbie G., 
born August 17, i860; and J. Harry, born 
May 27, 1865. Abbie G. married J. C. F. 
Mirick, of Princeton, in 1881, and her chil- 
dren are: Edith A., Ethel R., Allen A., 
Philip C., and Harry L. Mirick. Politically, 
Mr. Allen is a Republican. Since his major- 
ity he has taken a lively interest in town 
affairs. He has served as a Selectman at in- 
tervals since 1866, and he is now the chairman 
of the board. For several years he has been an 
Overseer of the Poor. He has occupied the 
Master's and Overseer's chairs in the local 
grange, and is actively concerned in all mat- 
ters relative to the general welfare of the com- 
munity. 




ILLIAM H. and ELWIN C. 
WHEELER, of Hubbardston, gen- 
eral merchants, are the sons of 
Silas and Amanda (Rice) Wheeler and repre- 
sentatives of a highly reputable family, an 
account of which will be found in a sketch of 
Silas Wheeler, which appears elsewhere in the 
Review. 

The elder brother, William Harvey 
Wheeler, was born in Lexington, Mass., Sep- 
tember 4, '1848. His education was acquired 
in the public schools. In 1875, in partner- 
ship with his brother, he opened a general 
store; and the firm has since carried on a 
thriving trade, dealing in dry goods, grocer- 
ies, boots, shoes, crockery, hardware, paints, 
oils, flour, grain, feed, fertilizer, etc. Mr. 
Wheeler has served his fellow-townsmen in 
various offices. He was a trustee of the pub- 
lic library from 1887 to 1897; member of the 
School Committee one year; Assessor for the 
years 1884, 1885; Overseer of the Poor in 
1886-87 and 1888; Selectman from 1886 to 
1 891, being chairman of the board during the 



last three years of that period; and Representa- 
tive to the legislature in 1894, serving upon 
the Committee on Finance and Expenditure. 
He has been Town Clerk and Treasurer since 
1895, and his ability and capacity are widely 
appreciated by his fellow-townsmen. He 
married Eliza S. Morrison, a native of Bos- 
cawen, N.H., and has had six children, 
namely: William H., born January 16, 1S80, 
who died June 14, 1893; Katharine A., born 
January 16, 1882; Bessie, born December 26, 
1883; Mildred, born August 26, 1885; Silas 
M., born April 12, 1888; and Madeline, born 
May 10, 1890, who died on May 6, 1894. 
Mr. Wheeler is a member of Hope Lodge, 
F. & A. M., of Gardner; and of the local 
lodge, Ancient Order of United Workmen. 

Elwin C. Wheeler was born in Barre, 
Mass., July 28, 1851. He has been a mem- 
ber of the firm of Wheeler Brothers since its 
establishment, and his business ability has 
aided materially in bringing the concern for- 
ward to its present position as the leading 
mercantile house in Hubbardston. 

On May 28, 1877, Mr. Wheeler married 
for his first wife Etta D. Conant, who died 
October 10, 1879. March 8, 1893, he mar- 
ried for his second wife Carrie M. Grimes, 
who was born in Hubbardston, July 28, 1869. 
The children of this union are: Guy M., born 
January 17, 1894; and Dorothy, born July 20, 
1897. 

Mr. Wheeler is a member of the Public Li- 
brary Committee. He is a thirty-second de- 
gree Mason, and is Worshipful Master of 
Hope Lodge, Gardner. In religious belief 
he is a Unitarian. Both he and his brother 
William are Republicans in politics. 




REN WHITE, formerly a prosperous 
merchant of Clinton, was born in 
Middlesex, Vt., July 1, 1S34. His 
father was Sanford White, a native of 
New Hampshire, who passed the greater part 
of his life as a farmer in that State and in 
Vermont. 

Oren White, after attending the common 
schools, at the age of eighteen entered the 
service of the Vermont Central Railroad Com- 



282 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



pany, and subsequently worked his way for- 
ward to the position of conductor, which he 
continued to hold for a number of years. 
Then, retiring from the railway service, he 
engaged in the clothing business in Meriden, 
Conn., where he remained two years, after 
which he carried on the same business in 
Taunton, Mass., for a short time. In 1872 
he opened a clothing store in Clinton, which 
he conducted successfully for a number of 
years thereafter. Honest, enterprising, and 
obliging, he retained his popularity with his 
business associates and the general public 
until his death, which occurred in 1889, when 
he had attained the age of fifty-five years. 
He was at one time quite active in local 
affairs, and capably filled some of the town 
offices. In religious belief he was a Congre- 
gationalism 



W; 



ILLIAM A. KILBOURN, superin- 
tendent of the Thayer farms in 
South Lancaster, was born in Gro- 
ton, Mass., July 16, 1838, son of Jeremiah 
and Patty (Flint) Kilbourn. Ancestors of 
the Kilbourn family were early settlers in 
Rowley, Mass., and some of its representa- 
tives became identified with the settlement of 
Fitchburg. The grandfather, William Kil- 
bourn, who was a native of that town, moved 
to Groton, where he followed farming and 
shoemaking until his death, which occurred 
in 1857. He reared a family of six children. 

Jeremiah Kilbourn, father of William A., 
was born in Fitchburg, and learned the 
hatter's trade, which he followed in Groton 
for some years. His last days were spent 
upon a farm in that town, and he died at the 
age of sixty-five. His wife, Patty, was a 
daughter of John Flint, a prosperous farmer of 
Concord, Mass., and a native of that section. 
She became the mother of eight children, two 
of whom are living, namely: Frances J., wife 
of James E. Wellington, of Wellington, 
Mass; and William A., the subject of this 
sketch. The mother lived to be seventy-five 
years old. Both she and her husband attended 
the Unitarian church. 

William A. Kilbourn prepared for college 



at Phillips Exeter Academy, and was gradu- 
ated from Harvard University with the class 
of 1858. For the succeeding fifteen years he 
was engaged in educational work. About the 
year 1873 he took charge of the agricultural 
property of the Thayers in South Lancaster, 
consisting of four large farms, of which he has 
since acted as general manager. 

In 1862 Mr. Kilbourn married for his first 
wife Ellen Levington, of Boston; and of that 
union were born two children — Robert B. 
and Ellen L. The last named married Arthur 
Mann, and is the mother of two children — 
Maud and Ellen C. Mr. Kilbourn's present 
wife, whose maiden name was Abbie F. Goss, 
has borne him eight children, namely: 
Martha, wife of George L. Willard, of Some'r- 
ville, Mass.; Elizabeth F. ; Arthur; Mary; 
Alice M.; Annie G. ; Ruth B. ; and Wal- 
ton G. 

In politics Mr. Kilbourn is a Republican. 
He has served as Moderator at town meetings 
for twenty years, has rendered valuable ser- 
vice to the community as a member of the 
School Board, and is also Overseer of the 
Poor. He is a Past Master of the Lancaster 
Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, has been sec- 
retary of the Worcester County Agricultural 
Society since 1883 and a member of the 
State Board of Agriculture for the same 
length of time. Mr. Kilbourn attends the 
Unitarian church. 



OHN H. LEFAVOUR, of East Brook- 
field, manager and treasurer of the 
Parmenter Manufacturing Company, 
was born in Beverly, Mass., October 
19, 1834, son of John and Nancy (Woodbury) 
Lefavour. He is of Huguenot ancestry. His 
parents were natives of Beverly, as was also 
his grandfather, Amos Lefavour. The latter 
was a seafaring man. John Lefavour, the 
father, was for many years identified with the 
shoe manufacturing industry in Beverly, in 
which city he died in 1872. 

John H. Lefavour was educated in the pub- 
lic schools and at the Beverly Academy. He 
was associated in business with his father 
from 1864 until the latter's decease. Subse- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



283 



quently he became book-keeper and general 
superintendent for the firm of David Lefavour 
& Son, shoe manufacturers of Beverly, which 
position he retained for a number of years. 
In 1892 he came to East Brookfield as man- 
ager and treasurer of the Parmenter Manufact- 
uring Company. This well-known concern 
is engaged in the manufacture of brick, and 
carries on a large business, employing in the 
busy season an average of one hundred and 
twenty-five men. Under Mr. Lefavour's able 
management its capacity to fill orders has 
been fully tested. 

Mr. Lefavour married Mary A. Richards, 
of Wenham, Mass. He has three children; 
namely, Howard R., Mary A., and John. 
Mary A. is the wife of Allen H. Bennett, 
cashier of the Beverly National Bank. As 
the official head of the most important indus- 
try in East Brookfield, Mr. Lefavour is one 
of the chief contributors to the prosperity of 
the town. Politically, he acts with the Re- 
publican party, and he has served with ability 
upon the Town Committee. 



B 



ANIEL W. MITCHELL, Select- 
man of Southboro, who has had 
charge of the Boston & Albany 
Railroad property at Cordaville for 
more than thirty years, was born in Newfield, 
York County, Me., February 13, 1830. His 
parents, John and Susan (Davis) Mitchell, had 
six children. The father settled on wild land 
in Newfield in 18 12, and established a home- 
stead there. One of the leading residents of 
the town, he served on the Board of Selectmen 
for many years. Thomas, the eldest child, in 
early life was educated in the public schools 
and later in the academy at New Market, 
N.H. He subsequently followed the voca- 
tion of teaching for many years, and, later 
settling on the old homestead, has since filled 
all the important offices in town. He has two 
sons living: Thomas Edwin, who lives on the 
old homestead; and John W., who is engaged 
in mercantile business in Worcester. John, 
the second son of John and Susan Davis 
Mitchell, was educated in New Market, N.H., 
and was actively engaged in the ministry in 



Maine for a number of years. He had one 
son, Francis A., who graduated at Bowdoin 
College, Maine, studied medicine with Dr. 
J. D. Mitchell at Jacksonville, Fla., and later 
settled at Bridgton, Me., where he had an ex- 
tensive practice. 

Another son of John and Susan D. Mitchell, 
Joseph D., a student of Parsonfield Academy, 
studied for three years with Dr. Jackson, of 
Boston, and graduated at Harvard Medical 
College. He had a large practice at Calais, 
Me., on both sides of the St. Croix River, for 
three years. Then he received an injury that 
made him an invalid for a time, and he went 
to Jacksonville, Fla., for his health. He was 
unable to walk when he arrived there, but his 
health steadily improved, and after a time he 
resumed practice. Having earned over a 
thousand dollars in a few months, he decided 
to remain in Jacksonville. At the time of 
the war he was worth over a hundred thousand 
dollars. He was a strong Union man; and 
General Sherman, when in that part of the 
South, was his guest. This fact aroused the 
enmity of the Southern sympathizers; and, 
when Sherman retired from the city, Dr. 
Mitchell's property, like that of others in 
sympathy with the North, was destroyed, and 
he was compelled to flee. He had planned to 
co-operate with General Sherman in an effort 
to bring Florida back into the Union, but his 
plan failed. He then came North, obtained 
an appointment as surgeon in the Eighth 
Maine Regiment, and served until the close 
of the war. For some time he was in charge 
of the Beaufort (S.C.) Hospital. When the 
army disbanded he returned to Florida, where 
he died about five years ago. He had two 
sons, Neal and Solace, who were educated re- 
spectively at Amherst and Harvard. Both 
became medical practitioners, and are among 
the leading doctors of Jacksonville. Neal is 
chairman of the Board of Health of that city, 
which position he held also at the time of the 
yellow fever epidemic a few years ago. 

Daniel W. Mitchell acquired much of his 
early education at Parsonfield Academy. He 
spent one year in New Brunswick with his 
brother, Dr. J. D. Mitchell, who was practis- 
ing there; and for ten years he managed the 



284 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



homestead farm at Newfield. He taught 
school for nine winters while in charge of the 
farm. When he was about thirty years of age 
he came to Southboro; and for three years he 
had charge of the Fayville railroad station 
here, under the old Boston & Worcester Rail- 
road. He was then appointed station agent at 
Cordaville, at that time a thriving manufact- 
uring village; and he has now entered upon 
his thirty-third year in that office. His real 
estate interests are extensive. He has spent 
several winters in Florida at his orange 
groves, which he bought in 1880. 

Mr. Mitchell was married to Anna S. 
Davis, a school teacher of Newfield, Me. 
Their only son, Elmer Lincoln Mitchell, who 
was educated in the public schools of South- 
boro and in Worcester Business College, has 
been connected with the B. & A. Railroad for 
several years. He has developed a special 
talent for mechanics and invention, and has 
obtained patents on several valuable inven- 
tions, one of which is an electrical railway 
time signal. He has taken several trips to 
Southern California and Florida for his health. 
Though actively interested in town affairs, 
Mr. Mitchell, Sr. , is quite averse to holding 
office. While in Newfield he served for six 
years on the School Board, and he has been 
for three years on the School Board of South- 
boro. He has been Selectman of Southboro 
since 1896. It is now some time since he be- 
came a member of the Masonic order. 



'AMES E. ANDREWS, superintendent 
of the J. H. Parker shoe factory at 
Berlin, was born in this town, Septem- 
ber 12, 1865, son of George H. and 
Adeliza J. (Howard) Andrews. His father 
was a native of Boylston, as was also his 
grandfather, James Andrews. The latter, 
previous to his death, at the age of thirty- 
three years, was engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness in Worcester. George H. Andrews in 
early youth resided for a time in Worcester. 
Learning the shoemaker's trade, he followed 
it subsequently in Boylston. H: enlisted as 
a private in Company K, Fifty-third Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Volunteers, with which 



he served nine months in the Civil War, and 
was discharged with the rank of Corporal. 
Upon his return he resumed shoemaking, and 
has followed that occupation in Berlin most 
of the time since. For some years he served 
the town as Constable. His wife, Adeliza J. 
Andrews, is a daughter of Rufus Howard, 
formerly a basket mnaufacturer of this town. 
She has reared a family of three children, of 
whom two are living: James E., the subject 
of this sketch; and Nettie. 

James E. Andrews began his education in 
the common schools of Berlin, and later took 
a business course of study in Boston. He 
learned the shoemaker's trade in Berlin, and 
since 1885 has been superintendent of J. H. 
Parker's factory, which manufactures rubber 
boots with leather soles, men's shoes, arctic 
socks, jackets, and similar articles. 

In 1885 Mr. Andrews contracted the first 
of his two marriages with Flora M. Babcock, 
daughter of William T. Babcock, of this town. 
She died at the age of twenty-six years, hav- 
ing been the mother of one son, William H. 
Mr. Andrews's present wife was before mar- 
riage Nettie McFarland, of Jamaica, Vt. 

In politics Mr. Andrews is a Republican. 
He is now serving his third year as a Select- 
man, and is also Overseer of the Poor and a 
member of the Board of Health. He is a 
member of the Clinton Lodge, No. 199, 
I. O. O. F., of Clinton; is connected with 
the Order of the Golden Cross; and has been 
commander of the local camp of the Sons of 
Veterans. 






ILLIAM H. MELLEN, chairman 
of the Board of Selectmen of Athol, 
was born in Spofford, N.Y. , No- 
vember 9, 1842. When but four years old he 
came to Orange, Mass., and his education was 
received in the schools of that place. In 
1861 he enlisted for three years in Company 
A of the Twenty-first Massachusetts Regi- 
ment, and, joining the Ninth Army Corps 
under General Burnside, was in the battles of 
Roanoke, Newbern, Camden, and second Bull 
Run. He was injured in the last-named 
battle, and afterward did detail service at 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



285 



Portsmouth Grove, R.I., at the Orderly's 
headquarters until his honorable discharge, 
May 5, 1864. From that time to 1868 he 
conducted a furniture business, and from 1868 
to 1894 he carried on a lumber and saw-mill 
business. He owns a tract of land which he 
has laid out in building lots, and he has 
erected several houses. His own dwelling 
was built twenty years ago. 

During the past three years much of his 
time has been given to public duties. He 
has held the offices of Selectman, Assessor, 
and Highway Surveyor continuously since 
1894 — four years; he was elected chairman 
of the Board of Selectmen in 1896, and now 
holds that office; was an Overseer of the 
Poor in 1895-96; a member of the Board of 
Health, 1894-95; and is now a member of the 
Athol Board of Trade. Many important 
works have been completed during his term of 
service as a Selectman. Three grade cross- 
ings — the School Street, Main Street, and 
Chestnut Hill — have been abolished; the 
electric railroad, which is now owned by a 
home company, has been built; the sewerage 
system, with its twelve miles of pipe, has been 
laid; and nearly two miles of State road in 
Athol connecting with about the same amount 
in Orange has been built, making a first-class 
thoroughfare between the two villages. All 
of these have required much of Mr. Mellen's 
time and attention, and the work has been 
done in a thorough and substantial manner. 
In the spring of 1897 he was elected a com- 
mittee of one to defend the town in lawsuits. 

In political principles and affiliation he is 
a Republican. He is a member of the Re- 
publican Town Committee, and has attended 
the different party conventions and served on 
committees. As a member of the Massachu- 
setts legislature, session of 1897, he served 
on the House Committee on Military Affairs. 
Fraternally, he is a charter member of Corin- 
thian Lodge, K. of P. ; a member of the Uni- 
formed Rank, K. of P. ; a member of Poquaig 
Club; and a member of the H. V. Smith 
Post, G. A. R., in which he has served two 
years as Commander. 

On July 7, 1864, Mr. Mellen was married 
to Miss Gertrude E. Squires, of Herkimer 



County, New York. They have two children, 
a son and daughter, namely: William D. 
Mellen, who runs a grocery store at Athol; 
and Mabel A., wife of Albert E. McReel, an 
electrician, who is now superintendent of the 
electric railroad at Exeter, N. H. 



28 



OHN R. BLACK, for a number of 
years a member of the Board of High- 
way Commissioners, East Brookfield, 
was born in Worcester, Mass., October 
1833, son of Amos R. and Hester E. 
(Brigham) Black. He is of English origin. 
James Black, his paternal grandfather, was a 
prosperous farmer of Barre; and one of his 
brothers is said to have imported the first 
smut-faced sheep to this country. Mr. 
Black's father was a native of Barre, and his 
mother of Boylston, Mass. The former was 
an extensive contractor in his day, a member 
of the firm of Dawson, Black & Co., of 
Worcester, who did the ballasting and stone 
work on the construction of the Worcester & 
Nashua Railway. 

John R. Black was educated in the public 
schools and at Worcester Academy. When a 
young man he took contracts for gravel and 
stone work in Worcester and the vicinity. 
About 1863 he was appointed Street Commis- 
sioner of Brighton, Mass., a position which 
he capably filled for eight years, doing much 
to improve the highways and thoroughfares of 
that town. For the succeeding five years he 
acted as superintendent of the Wellington 
Stock Farm at Lexington, Mass. Moving 
subsequently to East Brookfield, he was chair- 
man of the Board of Highway Commissioners 
there for three years. He later became super- 
intendent of the C. P. Blanchard Stock Farm 
at Brookfield, remaining in that capacity sev- 
eral years, after which he returned to East 
Brookfield, and was again elected Highway 
Commissioner. At the present time he is en- 
gaged in general farming. 

Mr. Black married for his first wife Abbie 
E. Clark, who bore him three children, of 
whom the only survivor is Charles A. Black, 
of Worcester. His present wife was before 
marriage Harriet E. Prentice, of Millbury, 



>86 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mass. Politically, Mr. Black is a Republi- 
can. Progressive and enterprising, he is in 
favor of all practical measures for developing 
the resources of the town. He attends the 
Baptist church. 




ILLIAM N. FELTON, proprietor 
of Valley View Farm, Bolton, and 
chairman of the Board of Select- 
men, was born in Boston, Mass., December 
25, 1835. His father, Joel Felton, was a 
native of Marlboro, Mass., as was also his 
grandfather, Joel, the latter being an indus- 
trious farmer. Joel Felton, the father, went 
to Boston when a young man, and for several 
years was engaged in the grocery business 
there. In 1836 he came to Bolton, and, set- 
tling upon the farm where his son now re- 
sides, he devoted the rest of his active period 
to agriculture. He died in 1886, at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-four years, having re- 
tained much of his accustomed vigor until the 
last. 

William N. Felton began his education in 
the common schools of Bolton, and was one of 
the first attendants at the Houghton High 
School. For several years thereafter he as- 
sisted in carrying on the home farm, later 
assuming its entire management, and caring 
for his parents during their declining years. 
Valley View Farm consists of one hundred 
acres of excellent tillage and pasture land, the 
soil, which is deep and fertile, being well cul- 
tivated. Hay and grain are its chief prod- 
ucts, and the splendid pasturage facilities are 
taken full advantage of by the proprietor, who 
keeps a large number of cows and supplies a 
milk route in Hudson. 

In 1 861 Mr. Felton married Sarah M. 
Blood, who was born in Jamestown, N.Y. 
Her father, Amos F. Blood, who was formerly 
a painter and a farmer, is still living, and 
resides in Sterling, Mass. She is the mother 
of three children, namely: William H., now 
a resident of Seattle, Wash. ; Everett M., a 
prosperous farmer of Hubbardston, Mass. ; and 
Arthur S. Everett Felton married Gertrude 
Hodges, and has four children — - Earle, Will- 
iam, Hazel, and Grace. Arthur S. Felton 



has charge of his father's milk business in 
Hudson. 

Politically, Mr. Felton is a Republican. 
He was formerly Overseer of the Poor and a 
member of the Board of Health, and he has 
been chairman of the Board of Selectmen since 
1892, a period of seven years. He was for a 
number of years Master of the local grange. 
He attends the Baptist church, of which Mrs. 
Felton is a member. 



ONATHAN COE BRADFORD was 
for many years a valued citizen of Mil- 
ford. Born in Smithfield, R. I., on 
Christmas Day, 1828, he was a son of 
James H. and Sarah (Aldrich) Bradford. He 
learned the mason's trade in his native place, 
and in later years employed the man of whom 
he learned it. Before the Civil War broke 
out, when the town had about three thousand 
inhabitants, he came to Milford, and soon had 
a prosperous business as a contracting mason. 
He was a capable and energetic business 
man, as well as a skilled workman. Nearly 
all the principal business blocks built in Mil- 
ford up to the time of his death were his 
handiwork. The handsome brick house in 
Bow Street, which was his home for fifteen 
years, and many of the largest Hopedale fac- 
tories were also erected by him. The work- 
manship of all these buildings is of the very 
best. Mr. Bradford had no desire for politi- 
cal honors, while he earned and easily kept 
the esteem of his fellow-citizens. His integ- 
rity throughout his eminently successful busi- 
ness career gained for him an enviable repu- 
tation. No man with whom he had dealings 
had ever occasion to question his statements, 
and his word was considered as good as his 
bond. Much interested in the Masonic fra- 
ternity, he was identified with the three local 
bodies: Montgomery Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Leb- 
anon Chapter, R. A. M. ; and Milford Com- 
mandery, K. T. 

Mr. Bradford was married on Christmas 
Day, 1855, to Angeline Nelson, who, born 
March 16, 1829, is a native of Sutton and a 
daughter of Nathaniel T. and Silence (Kenny) 
Nelson. The children of the marriage were: 




JONATHAN C. BRADFORD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



>8g 



Walter S., Ada N., and Lillian A. The 
family also included Charles Henry Brad- 
ford, an adopted child. After the death of 
Mr. Bradford his widow married Charles 
Porter Skillings, of Portland, Me., now de- 
ceased. 




UY W. GARLAND, M.D., chair- 
man of the Board of Selectmen of 
Gardner, was born in East Plain- 
field, N.H., December u, 1844, son of Na- 
thaniel and Mary (Elkins) Garland. The fam- 
ily name, which is of Saxon origin and means 
"gleaned from the land," has been spelled in 
various ways, as Garlon, Garlin, Garlen, and 
Garling. It was common in England in the 
fifteenth century; and an ancestor of Peter 
Garland, the founder of the name in New 
England, located in Wales. Peter Garland, 
who was a native of Wales and a mariner, em- 
igrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony, ac- 
companied by his wife and several children; 
and his name is mentioned among the freemen 
of Charlestown as early as 1637. One of his 
descendants went to New Hampshire. Na- 
thaniel Garland, Dr. Garland's grandfather, 
who resided in Boscawen, N.H., was commis- 
sioned Second Lieutenant, November 5, 
1775, in Moses Yeaton's company, of Pierce's 
Island. Nathaniel Garland, Dr. Garland's 
father, who resided in East Plainfield, was a 
wheelwright by trade and a man who stood 
high in the estimation of his neighbors. His 
wife, Mary, was a daughter of Richard Elkins, 
of that town. 

Guy W. Garland acquired his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Manchester, 
N. H., and Lowell, Mass. His medical 
studies were begun at the Harvard University 
Medical School and completed at the medical 
department of the University of Pennsylvania 
in 1867. Locating in Gardner immediately 
after receiving his diploma, he built up an 
extensive practice, enjoying in a high degree 
the confidence of his patients. He is now 
prominently identified with local affairs, 
being chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
upon which body he has served for eight 
years. 



Dr. Garland married Lavinia M. Upton, 
of Gardner, Mass., a daughter of Nehemiah 
Upton. Mrs. Gardner traces the origin of her 
family to the Norman Conquest, when sur- 
names first came into use in England. The 
first to establish the name in America was 
John Upton, who settled in Salem, Mass., in 
1658, and was the progenitor of a numerous 
posterity. Dr. Garland has two children: 
Frederick E., born in 1875, who is a graduate 
of Harvard University, class of 1898; and 
Paul N., born in 1885, who is a student in 
the public schools. Dr. Garland belongs to 
Hope Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Ivanhoe Com- 
mandery, K. T. ; and William Ellerson 
Lodge, I. O. O. F. 




-jURTON B. MURDOCK, dealer in 
boots, shoes, gentlemen's furnish- 
-'■' ings, and hats, located in Tracy 
Block, Webster, was born in North- 
field, Mass., January 1, 1840, son of Ben- 
jamin B. and Eunice (Alexander) Murdock. 
His father, who was born in Townshend, Vt., 
was a merchant in Northfield for some years, 
but in 1884 came to Webster. His mother 
was a native of Winchester, N. H. Of a fam- 
ily of six children, Burton B. Murdock is the 
only survivor. 

Mr. Murdock's early education was received 
in the public and high schools of Northfield, 
and at the age of twenty years he went to 
work in a general merchandise store in that 
town. After remaining as a clerk for three 
he started business for himself as a 
in general merchandise at Erving, 
where he continued for about four 
Going then to Royalston, he engaged 
in the same line of business there, remaining 
about ten years. In 1875 he came to Webs- 
ter, and started his present business, in which 
he has been very successful. His close at- 
tention to the wants of his customers, his 
promptness in filling all orders, and the fair 
dealing that has characterized all his business 
transactions, have won for him the public 
esteem and a long list of patrons. 

In 1869 Mr. Murdock was united in mar- 
riage with Abby K., daughter of John Pills- 



years, 
dealer 
Mass., 
years. 



290 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



bury, of Winchester, Mass. Of this marriage 
there are two children: Florence Jessie, born 
in 1875; and Edgar B., born in 1877. Flor- 
ence J. was educated at Webster, in the com- 
mon and high schools, and at the Worcester 
Normal School, from which she graduated in 

1895. She is now a teacher in Worcester. 
In 1896 she and her brother made a trip to 
the Pacific coast, visiting San Francisco and 
other places of interest. Edgar, who is a 
graduate of the Webster High School, class of 

1896, is now a clerk in his father's store. He 
has been a director in the Webster National 
Bank for a number of years, and is also a 
member of the Investment Board of the Five 
Cents Savings Bank. 



ISAAC FOLLETT, a retired tanner of 
Hubbardston, was born in this town, 
July 25, 1822, son of Isaac and Lucy 
W. (Rice) Follett. Samuel Follett, 
the paternal grandfather, who was an early 
settler in Hubbardston, came from Attleboro, 
Mass., and, locating upon a farm in the north- 
westerly part of the town, resided here for the 
rest of his life. He married first a Miss Met- 
calf and for his second wife a Miss Smith. 

Isaac Follett, father of the subject of this 
sketch, was a lifelong resident of Hubbards- 
ton, and his active years were spent upon a 
part of the homestead farm which he acquired 
by inheritance. He was an industrious farmer 
and a worthy, upright man. In politics 
he was in early life a Whig and later a Demo- 
crat. He died at the age of sixty-four years; 
and his wife, who was a native of Templeton, 
lived to the remarkable age of one hundred 
and one years and one month. They were the 
parents of nine children, all of whom grew to 
maturity, and three of whom are now living, 
namely: Charlotte, who resides in Hubbards- 
ton; Isaac, the subject of this sketch; and 
Mary Ann, who resides in Gardner, Mass., and 
is the widow of Moses Wheeler. The others 
were: Eliza, Lucy, Rusha, Sarah, Jonah, and 
John. 

Isaac Follett was educated in the district 
schools. He lived at home with his parents 
until twenty-one years old, and what money 



he earned previous to his majority he gave to 
his father. Subsequently he served an ap- 
prenticeship to the tanner's trade with Wood- 
ward & Warren, and still later learned the 
currier's trade in Grafton, Mass. Returning 
then to Hubbardston, he worked for his for- 
mer employers as a finisher for some years, 
later going to Monson, Mass., where he was 
employed as a journeyman until engaging in 
business as a member of the firm of Warren, 
Tobey & Co. Severing his connection with 
that concern a year later, he went to East 
Templeton, where for the succeeding three 
years he was associated with Warren Simonds. 
After selling his interest in the business car- 
ried on by Mr. Simonds, he was for a short 
time employed as a finisher at Stafford 
Springs, Conn. From the last-named place 
he returned to Monson, and continued as a 
journeyman currier until about 1884, when he 
retired to his farm- in Hubbardston, where he 
has since resided. 

In 1 861 Mr. Follett was united in marriage 
with Susan B. Goulding, of Millbury, Mass., 
who died in 1862, leaving no children. Po- 
litically, Mr. Follett is a Democrat and in 
his religious belief a Unitarian. He has a 
wide circle of acquaintances, and is a highly 
esteemed citizen. 




EWELL ELLIOTT GREEN- 
WOOD, M.D., who is successfully 
engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession at Templeton, was born in 
Hubbardston, Worcester County, Mass., Sep- 
tember 15, 1853, son of Alson J. and Martha 
G. (Moulton) Greenwood. His father is a 
well-known farmer and lumberman of Hub- 
bardston. Further reference to the family 
may be found in the sketch of Alson J. Green- 
wood, which appears on another page of the 
Review. 

Sewell Elliott Greenwood began his edu- 
cation in the common schools of Hubbardston, 
and continued it by a course of study at the 
Wilbraham Academy. Entering Harvard 
University Medical School in 1874, he was 
subsequently graduated with the class of 1877. 
In the following year he located for practice in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



291 



Templeton, where he has since resided. His 
practice extends to the adjoining towns, and 
he has acquired a wide reputation for skill in 
his chosen calling. In April, 1882, Dr. 
Greenwood was united in marriage with Char- 
lotte E. Smith, of Grafton, daughter of Lucius 
M. Smith. Mrs. Greenwood is the mother of 
three children : Lucius, born June 15, 1885; 
Arthur, born December 6, 1887; and Doro- 
thy, born May 22, 1892. 

Dr. Greenwood is a member of the Massa- 
chusetts State Medical Society and the Mil- 
ler's River Medical Society. For a number 
of years he has been a member of the medical 
staff of the Cottage Hospital for children. 
In politics a Republican, he has served upon 
the School Committee for the past eight years. 
He is a member of the Unitarian church, 
which his wife attends. 



KRANK J. KINNEY, of Worcester, 
one of the leading market gardeners 
and fruit-growers of the county, was 
born in the town of Sunderland, Bennington 
County, Vt., on May 30, 1833, son of Joel 
and Clarissa (Ford) Kinney. His grand- 
father, John Kinney, was of Irish birth. He 
married a Highland Scotch woman, who stood 
six feet and two inches high, had red hair, and 
was the equal in strength of almost any man. 
Their only child, Joel, was born in New 
Canaan, Conn., in 1793. When he was still 
an infant they removed to Vermont, going 
some forty miles through the woods by bridle 
paths, his mother carrying him on the saddle, 
together with some apple-trees, which they 
planted when they reached the place where 
they were to make their home. Eventually 
they became the owners of between two and 
three hundred acres of arable land and four 
hundred acres of mountain land. Both lived 
to be eighty years old, and both are buried in 
Sunderland, where also the mortal remains of 
Joel Kinney and his wife rest. 

At nineteen years of age Joel Kinney en- 
listed in the War of 1812. Later he became 
a farmer and mechanic, having considerable 
inventive genius. He was Justice of the 
Peace of his town for fifty-one years, and for 



eleven years held court five miles from his 
home, walking the distance back and forth. 
No case tried by him was ever appealed. He 
inherited the splendid physique' of his Scotch 
mother, standing six feet two inches in 
height and weighing two hundred and ten 
pounds. He wore a number twelve boot, and 
was a very strong man and a great worker. 
He was self-educated, being fond of reading. 
As a mechanic he could build anything, from 
a church to a clock ; and he actually made a 
large watch. He also constructed a most in- 
genious clock with platforms, upon which 
figures of a man and of a cock came out at 
times to number the hours. His son Frank 
has his old rifle, which has clone skilful execu- 
tion in its day. Joel's wife was a native of 
Peru, Mass., and came of a long-lived race on 
both sides of her family, her father and 
mother each living to be nearly a hundred 
years old. Her brother, Roderick Ford, is 
still living at the age of ninety-three. When 
eighty-five he walked out to his nephew's 
house from Worcester. Joel Kinney and 
Clarissa Ford were married in 1817, the groom 
being twenty-four years old and the bride 
thirty-four. They were the parents of the 
following-named children : Laura D. ; C. M. ; 
Benjamin H; Elizabeth C. ; Frank J., who is 
the youngest; and a daughter that died in in- 
fancy. Laura, who has never married, lives 
on the farm in Sunderland, where she was 
born. C. M. Kinney resides in Northampton, 
Mass., retired from business. Benjamin H., 
a stone-cutter by trade, residing in Worcester, 
became a sculptor of some note. He made a 
fine statue of Dr. Green. Elizabeth C, who 
married Lafayette Litchfield, of Roxbury, 
Mass., died at the age of fifty-four, leaving 
five children. 

Frank J. Kinney in his youth made the 
very most of his educational opportunities, 
which were only those of the common schools, 
and at the age of nineteen began teaching 
school for a winter term. This he continued 
for eight successive winters, meeting with 
entire success. He taught three winters in 
one district where previous teachers had met 
with the uncomfortable experience of being 
thrown out by the pupils. During summers 



292 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



he worked on the farm of Stephen Foster, of 
Worcester, who with his wife, Abby Kelly, 
was one of the leading anti-slavery workers in 
this section. They bad a remarkably fine 
peach orchard; and Mr. Kinney well remem- 
bers the 19th of April, 1855, when he first 
walked out from Worcester to view it. The 
petals had fallen from the trees. Three years 
later he married Mr. Foster's niece, Ann 
Foster, of Worcester. For the first six 
months after his marriage he was at home in 
Vermont with his parents, and subsequent to 
that he taught for eight months in New Jer- 
sey. He then returned to the home of his 
wife, and built his first dwelling here on a 
part of his present farm, his father-in-law 
having given him two and a half acres of land. 
This was about i860. In 1861 he volun- 
teered for service in the Northern army, but 
was rejected; and two years later he was 
drafted, but was also rejected, being in deli- 
cate health. The surgeon believing him to 
be short-lived, thought he ought to remain at 
home. Mr. Kinney took to horticulture as 
well as to agriculture, and the third year after 
he had settled on his farm he made fifteen 
hundred dollars clear of all expenses. From 
one strawberry bed, six rods long by a rod in 
width, he sold three hundred and fifty dollars' 
worth of berries and fifty dollars' worth of 
plants. These were the famous Jucunda 
Knoxes seven hundred berries, of which he 
had bought a box in New York for forty cents. 
He sold many of his at a dollar a quart. Mr. 
Kinney early conceived the plan of raising 
chickens without the care of the hens, and 
gave special attention to the brown Leghorn 
breed, selling trios from one hundred and fifty 
dollars to three hundred dollars, and sending 
them to many foreign countries. 

Mr. Kinney's first wife, above named, bore 
him seven children — Herbert R., Lorenzo 
F., Henry E., Emma F., Asa S., Clarence 
W. , and Sarah C. Herbert R. Kinney has a 
wife and two children. A sketch of him is on 
another page of this volume. Lorenzo, who 
is a graduate of the Agricultural College at 
Amherst, is a professor in the Agricultural 
College at Kingston, R.I. He is married and 
has three children, and also has a home of his 



own. Henry, who is an artist educated in 
the Boston Art School and by study abroad in 
France and Germany, has a studio in Agri- 
cultural Hall. Emma is a successful profes- 
sional nurse in the Boston City Hospital, 
from which she was graduated in 1897. She 
has charge of the sterilizing department and 
also of the operating-rooms. Asa, who was 
graduated from the Massachusetts Agricult- 
ural College in 1897, is now a professor of 
science in that institution. He is an inde- 
pendent investigator, and has already distin- 
guished himself by the application he has 
made of electricity as a germinating agency 
in the propagation of seeds. Clarence W. is 
a student in his third year in the Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute. He promises to be as 
able a man as are his brothers. Sarah C. is a 
student in the Worcester High School in the 
class of 1898. The mother of these children 
died in June, 1891, at the age of fifty-three. 
Mr. Kinney afterward married Fannie Dodd, 
daughter of Charles Dodd, and by this union 
he has three children: Robert F., aged five; 
Lucinda, aged three; and Frank D., aged two 
years. 

Mr. Kinney is a Republican, but he has 
never cared for political honors. His father 
held the highest Masonic office in the State of 
Vermont. Twenty-four years ago Mr. Kin- 
ney organized a farmers' club here, the Tat- 
nuck Club; and for nineteen years he was its 
president and secretary. He is one of the 
oldest members of the Worcester Horticult- 
ural Society. He has made additions to his 
original farm, and now owns one hundred 
acres. 



(©TirBBOTT A. JENKINS, a Deputy 
h\ Sheriff of Worcester County and an 
yJ|A esteemed citizen of Milford, was 
^— ^ born in West Townsend, Mass., 
forty-nine years ago. When he was two 
months old, his father, Augustine A. Jenkins, 
was killed by an accident; and his young 
mother, after having been married about eigh- 
teen months, was left to earn a livelihood for 
herself and her child. The maiden name of 
Mrs. Jenkins was Mary Bennett. She re- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 93 



raained a widow, and is still living in Shirley, 
at the age of seventy-two. She secured em- 
ployment, and supported herself and son until 
the latter was about nine years of age, when 
she went to work for N. C. Munson, of 
Shirley. 

A year later Abbott went to work for 
George Chanler, for whom his father also had 
worked at the age of ten years. He gained 
the fullest confidence of his employer, and 
when only eleven years old was left in charge 
of the men working on the place, whenever 
the master was obliged to be absent. Not 
only was he considered trustworthy in all 
things, but was thought to be capable of doing 
a man's work, and was sent into the field to 
mow with a two-horse mower, and expected 
to sharpen his own knives. From Mr. Chan- 
ler's he went to Ashburnham, where he lived 
two years with an uncle, the second year 
receiving fifteen dollars a month, and being- 
allowed to attend school during the winter. 
Then, feeling that he needed more schooling, 
he secured employment in Leominster, where, 
in exchange for caring for five cows and a 
horse, he was given his board and permitted to 
attend school. This opportunity lasted a year 
and a half; and at the end of that time he 
began working in a store at Shirley, where he 
remained a year. Going from there to Ayer 
Junction, he was in charge of the post-office. 
Here he remained for three years, during 
which time he locked and unlocked every 
mail that was brought into or carried out of- 
the office. He had no vacation whatever in 
the three years, and attended no entertainment 
of any kind. Thus it will be seen that the 
lessons of his early life were learned in a hard 
school. All this training and conscientious 
work, however, were not lost; and in later life 
they have borne good fruit. 

Mr. Jenkins now set up in business for 
himself at Ayer Junction as a butcher; but 
after a time he sold out, and accepted the 
charge of the books of the Bachellor Chair 
Company, in whose employ he remained until 
the firm failed. Returning then to Leomin- 
ster, he worked in a store with his cousin for 
two years, and at the end of that time sold out 
his interest, and embarked in the hotel busi- 



ness, which he subsequently followed for ten 
years, five years in the town of Harvard and 
five years in Clinton. 

While in the former place he was appointed 
Deputy Sheriff by General A. B. R. Sprague; 
and this position he has filled ever since, with 
the exception of three years. It may be noted 
that, besides attending to his duties as officer 
and landlord, he conducted various stage lines, 
and also a large livery and boarding stable. 
In Clinton he was Chief of Police for nearly 
three years, as well as Deputy Sheriff. In 
Milford a call was made on the Sheriff to 
send a competent Deputy here for special 
work, and Sheriff Sprague delegated Officer 
Jenkins for that position. That he was active 
and efficient is evidenced by the fact that at 
the following term of the Criminal Court Mr. 
Jenkins brought forward thirty- five cases, 
which required a full week for settlement, and 
excluded all other business until the expira- 
tion of that time. 

Since coming to Milford Mr. Jenkins has 
been prominently identified with its public 
interests, having served as chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen on various town commit- 
tees and for two years as Chief of Police. 
For a year and a half, also, he was superin- 
tendent of the Milford Water Works. He 
has carried on quite an extensive insurance 
business, and many estates have passed 
through his hands as trustee or assignee. He 
had charge of the second case under the 
"habitual criminal " law tried in Worcester 
County. As court officer and Deputy Sheriff 
for twenty years he has probably handled as 
many cases of hardened criminals as any other 
man in the county, and it is safe to say that 
he has a number of enemies in that class. 
In a corresponding degree, and as he has been 
instrumental in protecting and conserving the 
best interests of the community, he has the 
esteem and gratitude of the citizens in gen- 
eral. 

Mr. Jenkins is well known in the Masonic 
organization and in that of the Odd Fellows. 
He was made a Mason at twenty-one, while 
in Ayer, and later became a Royal Arch 
Mason in Marlboro Chapter and a member 
of Hudson Commandery. He subsequently 



2g4 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



transferred his membership to the Milford 
Commandery. He became an Odd Fellow in 
Harvard, and passed through the chairs in that 
body. He joined the encampment in Fitch- 
burg, but withdrew from that in order to help 
form an encampment in Clinton, and on going 
to Milford joined the Milford Encampment. 
He is also a member of various other social 
organizations in Clinton and Milford. While 
in Harvard he served on the State detective 
force for a year under Chief Clements. While 
in Clinton he was a director of the Board of 
Trade, and he is now a member of the Board 
of Trade in Milford. 

Mr. Jenkins pays high tribute to the char- 
acter and moral worth of the men with whom 
his lot was cast during his early years, and 
there is no doubt that their precept and ex- 
ample had much to do with forming and fixing 
those upright principles which have been his 
guide to action through all his life. Mr. Jen- 
kins was married first to Lawrence Shirley. 
She bore him one son, Arthur A. Jenkins, 
who was with the Swift's Chicago Beef Com- 
pany for eight years, and is now with Will- 
iams Brothers at Milford. Mr. Jenkins's 
second wife was before her marriage Emma L. 
Knight, of Ayer, Mass. 



7TAYRUS GALE, a well-known, philan- 
I Y thropic citizen of Worcester County, 

\~]s donor of the Gale Public Library 

building to the town of Northboro, 
his native place, where he is still a resident, is 
a representative of the seventh generation in 
descent from Richard Gale, who came to Mas- 
sachusetts — doubtless from England — within 
twenty years after the landing of the Pilgrim 
Fathers, and in 1640 bought nine acres of 
land at Watertown. As we learn from the 
Gale Family Records, by George Gale, 
LL.D., published in 1866, search for the 
origin of the family in the remote past has re- 
sulted in a bewildering variety of opinions on 
the subject. Some think it to have been of 
Welsh and others that it was of Scotch High- 
land antecedents, whence one form of the 
name, "Gael" or "Gaell." Burke's "Landed 
Gentry of England" speaks of "the family of 



Gale" as of importance in Yorkshire early in 
the sixteenth century. 

Besides Richard, of Watertown, there were 
other New England settlers of this name, 
among them Hugh, of Kittery, Me. ; Am- 
brose, of Marblehead; Bartholomew, of 
Salem; and Edmond, of Beverly — the last 
three thought by the author of the Records 
to have been sons of Edmond, of Cambridge, 
who died in 1642. 

The will of Richard Gale, of Watertown, 
dated February 25, 1678, and proved in April, 
1679, a ft er considerately providing that his 
well-beloved wife shall enjoy his "whole es- 
tate, both houses and lands and cattle of all 
sorts and all his household goods, for her 
comfort and maintenance during her natural 
life," proceeds to designate the manner in 
which after her death the property shall be 
divided among his four children and their 
heirs, naming his sons, Abraham and John, 
and his daughters, Sarah Garfield and Mary 
Flagg. 

Abraham Gale, born in 1643, second child 
of Richard, occupied the old homestead, situ- 
ated in what is now Waltham, and was a Se- 
lectman of Watertown in 1706 and in 1718, 
the year of his death. His name in his will 
is spelled "Gael." Sixteen children were 
born to him and his wife, Sarah, who was a 
daughter of Nathan Fiske, of Watertown. 
Nine of these grew to maturity and married. 
Abraham, Jr., the eldest, borri in 1674, mar- 
ried December 6, 1699, Rachel, daughter of 
John and Abigail (Garfield) Parkhurst and 
grand-daughter of George Parkhurst, an early 
settler in Watertown. 

Abraham Gale, third, the next in line, eld- 
est son of Abraham, Jr., and Rachel, and one 
of a family of eight children, born November 
28, 1700, married Esther Cunningham. He 
was a blacksmith by trade, and settled in 
Weston. He had eight sons and one daugh- 
ter that grew to maturity. Seven of the sons 
served in the French and Indian wars; and 
Abraham, the seventh son, died in the winter 
of 1757-58 from the effects of wounds re- 
ceived in the service. 

Abijah, the fourth son and representative 
of the fifth generation in this line, was born 




CYRUS GALE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



297 



July 25, 1727. He was twice married, and 
had six children by his first wife, Abigail 
Amsden, and eleven by his second wife, Su- 
sannah Allen, of Weston. Abijah and his 
family lived at Westboro. Several of the 
children died young, and some of those who 
grew to maturity never married. 

Cyrus, Sr. , tenth child of Abijah and Su- 
sannah (Allen) Gale and father of the subject 
of the present sketch, was born October 7, 
1785. In early manhood he was a grocer and 
provision dealer, wholesale and retail, in 
Boston. During the War of 1S12 he was 
Captain of a company of militia in that city. 
Removing to Northboro in 18 14, he served as 
Postmaster about five years, for fifty years 
was Justice of the Peace, was a member of 
the State legislature in 1844, and was a mem- 
ber of Governor Boutwell's Council in 
1852. He was in mercantile business in 
Northboro from 1815 until 1843. He spent 
his last years on his farm. 

The Hon. Cyrus Gale was three times mar- 
ried. His first wife, Eliza Davis, sister of 
the Hon. John Davis, United States Senator, 
died in 1822; his second wife, Sarah Patrick, 
who was born March 16, 1795, died December 
4, 1849; ar >d his third wife, Susan G. Hol- 
brook, died in 1888. He died September 10, 
18S0. His children, three by his first wife 
and four by the second, were: Frederick W., 
born June 22, 18 16, who married Mary S. 
Utley, of Boston; Hannah D., born January 
14, 18 18, who married George Barnes, and 
died July 15, 1851; Cyrus, born November 
25, 1821, died February 17, 1822; Cyrus, 
subject of this sketch, born March 6, 1824; 
George A., born February 19, 1827, died 
September 10, 1857; Walter, born November 
13, 1833; Susan M., born June 16, 1835, 
died June 22, 1842. 

Walter Gale, the younger of the surviving 
sons, now a resident of California, when a 
young man studied law in the office of the 
Hon. George F. Hoar, of Worcester, now 
United States Senator. During the Civil 
War he served as an officer in the Fifteenth 
Massachusetts Infantry, being commissioned 
Second Lieutenant in January, 1862; Captain, 
October 24 of that year; and Major, July 14, 



1864. He was in nineteen engagements and 
several skirmishes, was slightly wounded at 
Antietam, and received two bullet wounds 
at Gettysburg. Cyrus, the elder brother, 
attended school in Berlin, Mass., and at the 
age of fifteen, in 1839, entered Amherst 
A cademy. 

In 1844, before he was twenty-one, he went 
into business as a dealer in general merchan- 
dise, keeping a store in the village of North- 
boro. For some years the firm was Gale & 
Maynard. Later Mr. Gale's brother-in-law, 
Samuel Wood, became a partner. Mr. Gale 
sold out his interest in the concern in 1863, 
and retired from mercantile pursuits. He 
has since given his attention to the care of 
his property, consisting largely of real estate, 
to forwarding schemes of public improvement, 
and to unostentatious works of charity. 
Prompted by a desire to erect an enduring, 
costly, and attractive monument to the mem- 
ory of his honored father, and to confer on his 
native town a lasting benefit, after due delib- 
eration and consultation he- built at the ex- 
pense of thirty-two thousand dollars, and pre- 
sented to the town of Northboro in 1894, the 
beautiful Gale Public Library, a substantial 
structure of Milford granite, finished in quar- 
tered oak, a joy and a blessing for the present 
and for generations yet to be. 

Mr. Gale is the principal stockholder of the 
Northboro National Bank, of which he has 
been a director since 1880. In politics he 
has been an ardent Republican ever since the 
organization of the party. In religion a Uni- 
tarian, brought up in the faith under the pul- 
pit teachings of the late Rev. Dr. Joseph 
Allen, saintly and revered exponent of liberal 
Christianity of the Channing type, he has 
been in all his manhood years a stanch sup- 
porter of the old First Congregational 
Church. 

Mr. Gale was married on December 5, 
1850, to Miss Ellen Maria Hubbard, of Con- 
cord, Mass., daughter of Cyrus and Susannah 
(Hartwell) Hubbard and sister of Mrs. Sam- 
uel Wood, of Northboro. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gale have travelled much in 
the United States, having made many trips to 
the Pacific coast. Valuable paintings and 



298 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



other works of art, together with natural curi- 
osities, interesting relics, and well-selected 
books, including many volumes of the world's 
best literature, adorn their dwelling, marking 
it as the abode of refinement and taste. 



/®Yo 



EORGE ALLEN, a prominent citizen 
% '*) I of Brookfield, was born in Hiram, 
^ — Oxford County, Me., September 20, 
1826, son of Hosea and Dorcas (Blaisdell) 
Allen. He is of Scotch origin; and his pa- 
ternal grandfather, Jotham Allen, was a resi- 
dent of York County, Maine. Mr. Allen's 
parents, who were both natives of York 
County, removed to Oxford County in 1825, 
where the father was engaged in farming 
until his death, which occurred in 1870. 

George Allen was educated in the public 
and private schools of Hiram, Me. He as- 
sisted his father for a time in carrying on the 
home farm. Later, having learned the car- 
penter's trade with his brother, Christopher 
Allen, of Hiram, he followed it in Dover, 
N. H., and Fitchburg, Mass., for some years. 
Returning subsequently to Hiram, he fol- 
lowed carpentering and farming there, and 
also dealt quite extensively in cattle, until his 
removal to Fort Fairfield about 1883, where 
he resided for a short period. In 1885 he 
came to Brookfield, where he has since occu- 
pied a farm of fourteen acres, located on the 
main road to East Brookfield. 

Mr. Allen was first joined in marriage at 
Dover, N. H., with Cordelia Wentworth, 
daughter of Stephen Wentworth, formerly a 
well-known citizen of that town. He had two 
children — Jotham and Delia, neither of 
whom is now living. His wife died at Dover 
in 1858. Mr. Allen later married Nancie 
S. Pingree, who was a daughter of Theodore 
I. Pingree, of Denmark, Me. 

Politically, Mr. Allen is a Democrat. He 
now holds the office of cattle inspector, the 
duties of which he is well qualified to fill, and 
to which he was elected in 1897. Since 
locating in Brookfield he has interested him- 
self in the general prosperity of the commu- 
nity, and has gained the good will of his fel- 
low-townsmen. He is connected with the 



Patrons of Husbandry, and also belongs to 
Mount Cutler Grange, of Hiram, Me. 




Athol, 



AMUEL DVVIGHT SIMONDS, a 
prominent business man of West- 
minster and formerly Representa- 
tive to the legislature, was born in 
Mass., February 4, 1846, son of Albert 
and Sarah (Woodcock) Simonds. His father 
was a native of Winchendon, Mass., and his 
mother of Phillipston, Worcester County. 
His paternal grandfather was Elder Samuel 
Simonds, a Baptist minister, who built a 
church in New Boston (Winchendon), Mass., 
which is still standing. His maternal great- 
grandfather served in the Continental army 
during the Revolutionary War, enlisting at 
Athol. 

Samuel Dwight Simonds attended the pub- 
lic schools of Athol, and subsequently fol- 
lowed a commercial course of study at East- 
man's Business College, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 
His first employment was as book-keeper for 
his uncle, a patent-medicine manufacturer in 
Fitzwilliam, N. H., with whom he remained 
a year, after which, returning to Athol, he 
assisted his father for some time. About 
1S68 he came to Westminster as book-keeper 
for Merriam, Holden & Co., chair manufact- 
urers, with whom he remained four years. 
Later for a similar length of time he was 
engaged in the retail furniture business in 
Athol. Returning to Westminster in 1876, 
he was for over twenty years thereafter in 
charge of Artemas Merriam's chair factory, 
which was burned in October, 1S97. Since 
the death of Mr. Merriam, which occurred 
shortly after the fire, he has, been engaged in 
settling the estate. 

Mr. Simonds married Ida E. Merriam, 
daughter of the late Artemas Merriam. He 
is the father of three children, namely: Ralph 
M., born in 1878, who fitted for college at 
the dishing Academy, and is now a student 
at Yale University; Donald D., born in 1885, 
who is attending the high school; and Stella 
S., who was born in 1888. 

In 1882 Mr. Simonds was elected a member 
of the Board of .Selectmen, on which body he 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



299 



served for four years. During the last year 
and a half of that period he acted as chairman 
of the Board of Selectmen and Overseers of 
the Poor. He was elected to the office of 
Selectman for three years in 1895, re-elected 
in 1898 for three years, and is still chairman 
of the board. Politically a Republican, he 
was elected in 188S to represent the towns of 
Hubbardston, Princeton, Holden, Paxton, and 
Westminster in the legislature, and was as- 
signed to the Committee on Labor. For over 
twenty years he has acted as a Justice of the 
Peace. 




RANK E. PROUTY, a leading agri- 
culturist of Brookfield, was born here, 
October 5, 1859. A son of John E. 
and Sarah M. (Hodges) Prouty, who were also 
natives of Brookfield, he is of the third gener- 
ation of a family that has been prominently 
connected with the development of the town. 
His grandfather, Elliot Prouty, who was a 
native of Spencer, settled here in 1816, on the 
farm where Frank E. Prouty now resides. 
Before coming here Elliot had been engaged 
in drawing wire in Spencer, being the first 
person to do that work in that town. This 
was prior to the War of 18 12. He was very 
prominent in public affairs, holding all the 
more important offices at different times. 
While a resident of Spencer he was a Cap- 
tain in the State militia. John E. Prouty, 
born March 3, 1825, who died on April 5, 
1882, resided during nearly the whole of his 
life in Brookfield, and was one of the progres- 
sive farmers of this section. He was a qual- 
ified Justice of the Peace, and served the town 
as Assessor, Overseer, and Selectman, and 
was Highway Commissioner for several years. 
In politics he was a Republican. His wife, 
Sarah, was a grand-daughter of Captain War- 
ren Hamilton, who represented Brookfield in 
the General Court for a time. Of John E. 
Prouty's three children, the subject of this 
sketch is the only one living. 

Frank E. Prouty received his education in 
the common schools of this town, including 
the high school. Since early life he has been 
engaged in agriculture. Like his father he 



has made additions of land to the original 
homestead, which now has a large acreage. 
This is under good cultivation, and produces 
fine crops. Mr. Prouty married Abbie E. 
Bemis, a daughter of Charles and Helen S. 
Bemis. Mrs. Bemis is now deceased; while 
Mr. Bemis is residing at South Bend, Ind. 
Mr. and Mrs. Prouty have one daughter, Helen 
S. Prouty. In accordance with the traditions 
of his family, Mr. Prouty has given much 
time and thought to the consideration of pub- 
lic questions and to the public service. For 
two years he has been a Selectman of Brook- 
field, a member of the Board of Overseers of 
the Poor for the same length of time, and for 
a number of years he was inspector of cattle. 
He has also served for several years as Auditor 
of the town. Fraternally, he is a member of 
the P. of H. Lodge, No. 174, of which at 
present he is the Master. In politics he is 
a Republican. 



KRANK R. TOWLE, station agent and 
Postmaster at Pratt's Junction on the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad, was born in Kenduskeag, Penobscot 
County, Me., June 2, 1866, son of Albert and 
L. Ellen (Trask) Towle. 

In the History of Hampton, N.H., it is 
stated that "Philip Towle, the patriarch of 
the Towle families," came to Hampton as 
early as 1657. About the year 1770 the 
progenitor of this branch of the family settled 
in Greenland, N. H., whence he removed to 
Gilmanton, N. H. The great-grandfather of 
the subject of this sketch was born in Gilman- 
ton, N. H., but eventually made a home in 
Maine, and spent the latter part of bis life 
there. Both he and his son, Levi F. , were 
veterans of the War of 1S12. 

Levi F. Towle, born in Monmouth, Kennebec 
County, Me., spent his active life as a farmer. 
During his last years his home was in Ken- 
duskeag, Me., where he died, aged eighty-five 
years. He married a Miss Mitchell, a native 
of Maine. She died aged seventy-five years. 
They had twelve children. Albert Towle was 
born in Kenduskeag. He received a common- 
school education, and for a time engaged in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



teaching school. He made his home with his 
parents on the farm until he was twenty-five, 
at which time he went into the United States 
navy. Previous to this he had had a taste of 
sea life. During his term of service he was 
on the frigate "Sabine" and the monitor 
"Nantucket." He was at the siege of 
Charleston, and went with the "Sabine" to 
the coast of Africa in pursuit of the rebel war- 
ship "Alabama. " Subsequently he was with 
the Seventh Maine Battery until the close of 
the Civil War, participating in ten fixed 
battles and serving with distinction. He was 
a non-commissioned officer. Returning home 
after his discharge, he spent the next fifteen 
years as a farmer. He then removed to Ban- 
gor, Me., and went into business as a hay and 
grain dealer, which he followed up to the 
time of his death, in 1889, his age being 
fifty-four years. Mrs. Towle is a daughter of 
James Trask. She now resides in Kendus- 
keag. Three of her four children are living, 
namely: Frank R. ; Harry E., a jeweller in 
Kenduskeag; and Mabel E. Mrs. Towle is 
a member of the Baptist church, with which 
her husband was also identified. 

Frank R. Towle, whose name appears at the 
head of this sketch, was twelve years old when 
his parents removed from Kenduskeag to 
Bangor; and his education was begun in the 
former place and completed in the latter. On 
leaving school he entered the employ of his 
father as clerk, continuing with him until he 
was nineteen. The following year he was 
with the New England Telephone Company, 
and at the age of twenty he came to Massa- 
chusetts and took a position with the Old 
Colony Railroad as assistant agent. He has 
since been in similar positions, such as tele- 
graph operator, freight clerk, ticket agent at 
different stations on the line, including Ber- 
lin, Leominster, and Fitchburg. In 1892 he 
came to his present position as station agent 
and Postmaster of Pratt's Junction. 

In 1889 Mr. Towle was joined in marriage 
with Jennie A. Rice, of Sudbury. She is a 
daughter of A. W. Rice, formerly station 
agent of Sudbury. Mr. Rice was born in 
Boston, of an old family. His father, a na- 
tive of Sudbury, was one of the forty- 



niners of California. Mr. and Mrs. Towle 
have had two children, but only one is living 
— Helene, six years old. 

In politics Mr. Towle is a Republican. 
He is a member of the Town Committee, and 
was secretary of the Republican Club during 
the campaign of 1896. He is a Justice of the 
Peace. He is a Mason of high degree, be- 
longing to Wilder Lodge, F. & A. M., of 
Leominster; Thomas Chapter, R. A. M., of 
Fitchburg; Jerusalem Commandery, Knights 
Templar, and Aleppo Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine of Boston. In religious matters he is 
liberal. 



Y^)UTHER MOORE, a highly respected 
Ijj resident of Worcester, was born in 
S Jf ^ April, 1830, on the old Moore farm 
in this city, then a town. A son 
of Nathaniel Curtis and Sarah (Childs) Moore, 
he is of the eighth generation from John 
Moore, who came over from Ireland about 
1640. Beginning with the third generation 
from John Moore, the line of descent is: 
Nathaniel, 3 Isaac, 4 John, s Willard, 6 Nathaniel 
Curtis, 7 and Luther. s 

Nathaniel Moore, 3 grandson of John, 1 came 
from Sudbury to Worcester at an early date, 
and once or twice was driven from his home 
by the Indians, who were then the principal 
inhabitants of this region. In 1713 his son 
Isaac settled on Moore's Hill, which was the 
birthplace of Isaac's son John, who became 
a farmer and miller, and who married Esther 
Bigelovv. This John Moore of the fifth gen- 
eration was drowned at his mill near Latnuck. 
His children by his wife, Esther, were: Lydia, 
who married John Snow, of Spencer; Esther, 
who married David Draper, of Leicester; 
William, who married and settled in Worth- 
ington ; Tyler, who married, and died in 
Worcester; Joshua, who married first Deborah 
Townsend and second Martha Harris, and who 
settled in Westminster; Willard, who married 
Mary Curtis and for his second wife Mrs. 
Mary Maynard. 

Willard Moore, last named, of the sixth 
generation, was the next in lineal descent. 
He was born October 12, 1775, and died 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



301 



February 13, 1859. He had nine children; 
namely, Seraph, Nathaniel Curtis, Peregrine 
C, John R, Sybil, Alexander, Winthrop, 
Ephraim, and Harrison. Seraph was the wife 
of Ithamar Smith. Nathaniel C. was a farmer 
of Salisbury Street, Worcester, Mass. Pere- 
grine went to Peoria, 111., and died there 
unmarried. John B. was a farmer in Holden. 
He died June 2, 1876. Sybil died, aged 
eighty-six. Winthrop died February 1, 1850, 
in Worcester. Ephraim, born in 181 5, died 
1 83 1 ; and Harrison died March 30, 1893. 

Nathaniel Curtis Moore, who was born 
October 11, 1800, on Moore's Hill, about 
1826 settled on the old Moore farm in this 
city, the place now occupied by his son Pliny, 
having purchased seventy -five acres of the 
Deacon John Chamberlain farm on Hancock 
Hill about 1825. He was Captain of a com- 
pany of cavalry. He was twice married, first 
to Sarah Childs, by whom he had three sons 
— Calvin, Luther, and Curtis, Calvin died 
of fever in Hayti in 1863, at thirty-eight 
years of age, soon after going there; and his 
wife died next day. Luther is the special 
subject of this sketch. Curtis, a retired 
machinist, resides in Holyoke, Mass. For 
his second wife, on March 13, 1833, Nathan- 
iel Curtis Moore married Patty Moore, a sec- 
ond cousin, who was born in Holden, Mass., 
December 24, 1803. Her father, Jonathan 
Moore, was a Revolutionary soldier, and 
served throughout that memorable struggle. 
There were seven children by this second 
union. Two died in infancy, and two sons and 
three daughters lived to maturity; namely, 
Sarah, Seraph, Eunice, Pliny, and Baxter. 
Sarah is the wife of David W. Kimball, of 
Mitchell, la. Seraph resides with Pliny on 
the old farm on Salisbury Street, near Forest 
Street, in the home of their birth. Eunice is 
the wife of Nathan Franklin Foster. Baxter 
Moore is a farmer in Dudley, Mass. Their 
father died May 30, 1881. 

Luther Moore was married in 1862 to Mary 
Caroline Reed, of Dummerston, Vt. They 
have three children — Helen J., Clifford C. , 
and Elizabeth C. Helen J. is the wife of 
Ephraim Currier, and has three daughters. 
Clifford C. , a machinist living next door, 



married Angeline M. Damon, and has one 
son, Lester Nathaniel. Elizabeth is the wife 
of E. H. Carroll. 

In political views Mr. Moore is a Republi- 
can. The dwelling-house at 22 Mason Street, 
which is the home of Mr. Moore and his fam- 
ily, was built by him in iJ 



'JjYOHN F. SMITH, a prosperous farmer 
of East Brookfield, was born on Cape 
Cod, December 24, 1844, son of John 
R. and Charlotte (Hinckley) Smith. 
His paternal grandfather, David Smith, also 
a native of Cape Cod, was a seafaring man. 
The father, born in Barnstable, Mass., fol- 
lowed the sea in the West Indies trade for 
a time, and was later an officer of a sailing- 
vessel plying between New York and Balti- 
more. At the age of forty years he retired to 
a farm in Barnstable. In 1864 he moved to 
Princeton and later to Brookfield, where he 
died in 1875. His wife, Charlotte, was a 
native of Nantucket. 

Having been reared and educated in Barn- 
stable, John F. Smith when sixteen years 
old shipped as a sailor on board of the coast- 
ing-vessel, "Louis Spannier, " commanded by 
Captain Enoch Lewis. He spent three years 
on this craft, which was engaged principally 
in carrying supplies to the Federal army in 
the South, and worked his way forward to the 
position of first mate. Then, abandoning the 
sea, he was for the next seven years engaged 
in farming in Princeton, Mass. Later he 
became a locomotive engineer. About the 
year 1876 he came to Brookfield, where he 
has since given his attention to agriculture, 
and owns a well-improved farm of one hun- 
dred acres. 

On November 2, 1880, Mr. Smith was 
joined in marriage with Elizabeth (Rice) 
Henshaw, a native of Brookfield. Her par- 
ents, William and Julia (Walker) Rice, were 
natives respectively of this town and Stur- 
bridge, Mass. Her great-grandfather, Benja- 
min Rice, was a resident of Brookfield; while 
her grandfather, William Rice, who served as 
a soldier in the Revolutionary War, was a 
native of Brookfield. She has one sister, 



302 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Laura, who is the wife of Dwight Fisher, of 
Brookfield. A Republican in politics, Mr. 
Smith takes a lively interest in local affairs; 
and he is a member of the Republican Town 
Committee. He has served as a Selectman 
for one year, and he has been a member of 
the Board of Assessors for three years. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Smith attend the Union chapel 
at Podunk. 




|EV. GEORGE A. PUTNAM, for 
the past twenty-seven years the pastor 
of the First Congregational Church 
at Millbury, son of the Rev. John 
Milton and Arethusa (Brigham) Putnam, 
was born in Dunbarton, N.H., on May 8, 
1835. His ancestors several generations back 
were Englishmen. His grandparents, Reuben 
and Elizabeth (Mason) Putnam, were farmer 
folk of Sutton, in moderate circumstances. 
They had a family of seven children, all 
sons, the most of whom grew to manhood. 

John Milton Putnam, who was born in Sut- 
ton in 1794, died on August 18, 1871. He 
graduated at Brown University, and subse- 
quently was called to a pastorate in Ashby, 
Mass., where he preached for five years. 
From there he went to Epsom, N.H. Pulpit 
work having strained his voice, he was now 
obliged to rest from preaching for a time, 
and for four years occupied an editorial posi- 
tion. When he was again able to take up 
his pastoral duties, he was settled at Dunbar- 
ton, N. H., where for thirty-one years he was 
actively engaged in ministerial work. This 
was his longest pastorate. At its close, when 
his son began preaching, he retired. Hav- 
ing died at the home of his daughter in 
Elyria, Ohio, he was buried in that town. 
His wife had died some ten years previously, 
on September 19, 1861. Of the eight chil- 
dren born to them, two sons and one daugh- 
ter grew to maturity. Antoinette, the daugh- 
ter, who married Isaac S. Metcalf, died in 
1875, at the age of forty-seven years, leav- 
ing nine of her twelve children. The other 
brother, who had learned the stone-mason's 
trade, died when nineteen years of age. 
Having attended the district school at Dun- 



barton for the usual period, George A. Putnam 
fitted for college at Kimball Union Academy 
in Meriden, N.H. In 1858 he graduated at 
Union College, receiving the degree of Master 
of Arts and two years subsequently at the 
Theological Seminary in Bangor, Me. He 
occupied his first pastorate, which was at 
Yarmouth, Me., from i860 to 1870. From 
there he came to his present charge in Jan- 
uary, 1 87 1. He was not, however, installed 
until April 11, 1872. During his long min- 
istry here his life has become closely inter- 
linked with the lives of his parishioners, and 
ties of strong affection and tenderness have 
been formed. For many years the church 
membership has been about two hundred. In 
1897 the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary 
of the founding of the church was celebrated, 
and was an occasion of much interest and im- 
portance. 

On November 12, i860, Mr. Putnam was 
united in marriage with Fannie Maria Wells, 
of Dedham, Me., a daughter of the Rev. James 
and Jane P. (Webb) Wells, both of whom are 
now deceased. The Rev. Mr. Wells, a grad- 
uate of Bangor Theological Seminary and of 
Jefferson College, Pennsylvania, was a Con- 
gregational clergyman. He preached as city 
missionary in Bangor for eight years, and was 
subsequently settled over parishes at North- 
bridge, Mass., Dunbarton, N. H., and Halifax 
and Douglas, Mass. His death occurred at 
the last-named place in 1892, and he was 
buried in Douglas. His wife, who died in 
1884, was laid to rest at North Weymouth, 
Mass. Their only other child was Joseph S. 
Wells, of Holyoke. Mrs. Putnam died on 
August 6, 1879. M r - Putnam contracted 
a second marriage on June 23, 1881, with 
Hannah Louisa Sabin, of Millbury. He has 
been the father of six children; namely, 
George H., Jennie L. , Grace, Fannie May, 
Florence A., and Harry W. Grace died in 
infancy. George H., who is a professor in 
the Texas School for the Deaf at Austin, 
studied at the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College in Amherst and at Lehigh Univer- 
sity in Bethlehem, Pa. He married a widow, 
who has one child by her first marriage. 
Jennie Putnam, who is a graduate of North- 




GEORGE A. PUTNAM 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3°5 



field Seminary, is now a book-keeper and 
stenographer in the Y. M. C. A. rooms at 
Worcester, and resides with her father. 
Fannie and Florence are also graduates of 
Northfield Seminary. The latter is now pur- 
suing a course of study in Becker's Business 
College. Harry is a student at Mount Her- 
mon School. While in college Mr. George 
A. Putnam, the father, was a member of the 
Theological Society, also of the Debating 
Club and a literary society. In October, 
1875, he went to Europe, and for a year was 
engaged in travelling, his parishioners contin- 
uing his salary during his absence. He vis- 
ited Glasgow, France, Italy, Egypt, and the 
Holy Land, and had many delightful experi- 
ences. Both he and his wife are held in warm 
regard, not only by the members of the 
church, but by the townspeople at large. 



§OAB C. WRIGHT, a retired farmer of 
Hubbardston, was born in this town, 
January 29, 1810, son of Charles and 
Betsey (Clark) Wright. The paternal 
grandfather, Joseph Wright, who came here 
from Woburn, Mass., as a pioneer, settled 
upon land in the eastern part of the town. 
He was a Revolutionary soldier and one of 
the leading farmers of Hubbardston in his 
day. When he died he had attained a good 
old age. 

Charles Wright was born in Hubbardston, 
September 24, 1789. When nineteen years 
old he began to learn the shoemaker's trade, 
and afterward followed it until his death, 
which occurred December 8, 1847. Pie also 
erected buildings which considerably improved 
the appearance of the town. Early in life he 
was a Democrat and later an abolitionist. 
In his last years he held some of the impor- 
tant town offices. His religious belief was 
the Methodist creed. His wife, who was born 
in Hubbardston, January 29, 1792, had eight 
children, two of whom are living: Joab C. , 
the subject of this sketch, who was the first- 
born ; and Reuben, who is residing in San 
Diego, Cal. The others were : Louisa, 
Charles J., Lucy, Catharine, Freelove E., and 
Adelaide. The mother died November 13, 



1880. She was a member of the Congrega- 
tional church. 

Joab C. Wright was educated in the district 
schools. He learned the shoemaker's trade 
with his father, of whom he purchased his 
time some five months prior to his majority 
for forty dollars. During the succeeding ten 
years he followed shoemaking upon his own 
account. He then turned his attention to 
farming, which became his principal occupa- 
tion. Having bought his present property in 
1864 or 1865, he continued to actively super- 
intend its cultivation until his retirement in 
1890. He is still strong and active, both 
physically and mentally, reading and writing 
without the aid of glasses. 

On April 17, 1832, Mr. Wright married 
Lucetta Pond, who was born in Hubbardston, 
April 20, 1812, daughter of Lewis and Polly 
(Hinds) Pond. She died March 20, 1893. 
Of the children of this union three are living: 
Worthington V. B., born December 10, 1832; 
Julia A., born September 14, 1839; and 
Charles J., born November 20, 1841. Worth- 
ington V. B. Wright, who resides in West- 
boro, Mass., married Phoebe Andrews, and 
has one daughter living, Harriet L. Julia A. 
Wright became the wife of George P. Rich- 
ardson, of Boston, and has seven children — 
Alice A., George, Effie H., Mary W., Jose- 
phine G., Arthur L., and Charles H. Charles 
J. Wright is unmarried, and resides in Hous- 
ton, Tex. Mr. Wright, Sr., cast his first 
Presidential vote for Andrew Jackson in 1832 ; 
and he has been a Republican since the for- 
mation of that party. He is a member of 
the Unitarian church, and takes an active 
interest in church work. 




^ILANDER HOLMES, a prominent 
man of Brookfield, was born in Staf- 
ford Springs, Conn., January 17, 
1843. A son of Horatio and Chloe 
(Bassett) Holmes, respectively natives of 
Stafford Springs, Conn., and Enfield, Mass, 
he comes of English stock, and traces his 
descent to John Holmes, who settled in Wood- 
stock, Conn., in 1686, and who was also the 
immigrant ancestor of Oliver Wendell Holmes. 



3°6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



David Holmes, the grandfather of Philander, 
served in the Revolutionary War; while a 
David Holmes of the preceding generation 
fought in the French and Indian War, and was 
afterward a surgeon in the Revolutionary 
army. Horatio Holmes, who spent his life 
at Stafford Springs, for a quarter of a century 
or more was prosperously engaged in growing- 
nursery stock, an occupation for which his 
love of floriculture peculiarly adapted him. 

Philander Holmes received a good common- 
school education in the town of his birth, and 
while living with his parents obtained a thor- 
ough knowledge of horticulture and of the art 
of raising vegetables and small fruits. In 
1870 he came to Massachusetts, and, settling 
in the town of Monson, was there engaged for 
three years in gardening. Coming from there 
to West Brookfield in 1873, he formed a part- 
nership with Deaton Barnes, with whom he 
successfully manufactured boot and shoe heels 
under the firm name of Barnes & Holmes. 
After the death of Mr. Barnes's wife in 1875 
Mr. Holmes bought out his partner's interest 
in the firm, and subsequently conducted the 
business alone for seventeen years. In 1892 
he gave it up, and again took up gardening, 
which he has since followed. He also deals 
extensively in wood and lumber. 

Mr. Holmes first married Nellie Barnes, 
who died a few years after the union. His 
second wife, Emma Johnson Holmes, lived 
but a comparatively short time, also. A third 
marriage united him with Mary Fairbanks, 
a daughter of Charles Fairbanks, of West 
Brookfield. Actively interested from his ear- 
liest youth in all things pertaining to agri- 
culture, Mr. Holmes is a valued member of 
the West Brookfield Farmers' Club. Both he 
and Mrs. Holmes belong to the West Brook- 
field Grange, of which she has been Master 
for the past two years and he the treasurer. 
He is likewise the secretary and treasurer of 
the Ouaboag Building Association and the 
treasurer of the Quaboag Historical Society of 
this town. A stanch Republican in his poli- 
tics, he has rendered efficient service to his 
fellow-townsmen during the past ten years as 
Assessor, being the chairman of the board for 
the last five years. Also, for ten years he 



has been the treasurer of the Congregational 
church, to which he belongs, and, as a leading 
member of the Building Committee, solicited 
money to erect the present house of worship 
of that society, and was instrumental in act- 
ually raising a large proportion of the required 
funds used in its construction. 




UTHER RICE EAMES, a retired 
farmer residing on Rice Street, 
Worcester, was born in West Boyls- 
ton, Mass., March 14, 1826, son 
of Levi and Betsey (Rice) Eames. The 
paternal grandfather, William Eames, a na- 
tive of Holliston, Mass., came to Worcester 
at an early date. It is told of him that, hav- 
ing chosen a spot in the woods upon which to 
build a house, he went to the house of a 
neighboring settler for dinner, leaving his 
jacket to mark the place. He cleared a farm 
from the wilderness. His land included the 
property now owned by his grandson. He 
married a Miss Jennings, of Natick, Mass., 
and reared four sons and three daughters, all 
of whom became the heads of families and 
lived to a good old age. The name of his 
youngest son was William. A daughter of 
the latter, now living in Michigan, is over 
ninety years old. Grandfather Eames and his 
wife were buried in Boylston. 

Levi Eames, a native of Boylston, born in 
1784, was a prosperous farmer. He spent the 
greater part of his life upon the farm where 
his son now resides. His first wife, whose 
maiden name was Hephzibah Winter, had no 
children. His second wife, Betsey, whom he 
married in 1819, was a daughter of Luther 
Rice, whose farm in Worcester is still owned 
by his descendants. Of her four children, 
one died young. The others were : John B., 
who was a farmer in West Boylston, and died 
in 1895, aged seventy years; Luther R., the 
subject of this sketch ; and Levi Lincoln 
Eames, the youngest brother, who died in the 
trenches in front of Petersburg during the 
Civil War. The father died in 1872. When 
the mother died, in 1862, she was nearly sev- 
enty years old. Levi and his brother William 
married sisters. It is related of Betsey that 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3°7 



prior to her marriage she rode on horseback 
through the woods to Montreal. 

Having worked upon the home farm since 
he was old enough to be of service, Luther 
Rice Eames became a proficient gardener. 
Afterward for six years he was employed upon 
an estate in North Dorchester, owned by a 
retired Boston merchant. While there he 
lived in the house in which Edward Everett 
was born. With that exception, his active 
life has been spent where he now resides; and 
he cultivated the farm successfully until his 
retirement. He is not a church member, nor 
has he ever joined any social or fraternal 
order; but he belongs to the local agricult- 
ural and horticultural societies. 

On June 3, 1856, Mr. Eames was united in 
marriage with Mary A. Wadel, a native of 
Germany. Two of his children died of scarlet 
fever, one at fifteen and the other at eight 
years. The others are: Canly, who is resid- 
ing at home, and who was for ten years a 
bridge builder on the Northern Pacific Rail- 
road, and who is married and has an infant 
son, Kenneth Reid ; Valdo, who is also a 
bridge builder in the employ of the same 
company; Ilia, who is the wife of James 
Murphy, of Greendale, and has three children; 
and Estus, an engineer on the Boston & Maine 
Railroad, residing in Northampton, Mass. 
Mrs. Eames died from influenza in 1895. 
Mr. Eames has suffered severely from the 
same disease for the past four years. 



SAMUEL BURPEE, a thriving farmer 
and prominent citizen of Sterling, 
Mass., was born in this town, June 30, 
1850, son of James and Eunice W. 
(Goss) Burpee. His paternal grandfather was 
John Burpee, a native of Sterling, by occupa- 
tion a tiller of the soil. 

James Burpee, son of John, was born and 
reared in Sterling; and when a young man he 
bought a farm located in the vicinity of his 
son's present residence. Lie later purchased 
the Oliver Johnson farm, which he carried on 
for a number of years ; and he then moved to 
where he now resides. He was formerly a 
Road Commissioner. Though now eighty- 



one years old he is still healthy and in full 
possession of his physical and mental powers. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Eunice W. 
Goss, was a daughter of John Goss, a prosper- 
ous farmer of Lancaster. She died in 1892, 
aged seventy - five years, having been the 
mother of ten children. Eight of this family 
are living, namely: William H., foreman of 
E. W. Pollard's farm, Leominster; Mary, who 
married Henry S. Sawyer; Fred W. Burpee; 
J. Samuel, the subject of this sketch ; Addie 
M. , for many years a school teacher; Ethel 
J., wife of Calvin L. Brigham ; Sarah R., 
who married G. Frank Buttrick, foreman of 
the Cloverly Farm, Lancaster; and Hattie C. 
Burpee, who is residing with her father. The 
parents attended the Congregational church. 

J. Samuel Burpee completed his education 
at the Allendale Institute, and when a young 
man he taught school for seven winters. 
When he was twenty-six years old he and his 
brother bought a farm in the Redstone dis- 
trict; and, after cultivating the land together 
for five years, they divided the property. J. 
Samuel Burpee has added to his portion by 
purchasing adjoining land, and now owns 
about forty-three acres, which he devotes to 
general farming, making specialties of dairy- 
ing, fruit and poultry raising, his pens of 
Bucks County fowls being greatly admired by 
all observers. He has improved his property 
by increasing the fertility of the soil, which 
enables him to raise large crops of hay and 
feed. In 1897 he kept thirteen cows and 
three horses. In politics he is a Republican, 
and has been clerk of the Board of Selectmen 
since 1894. He is also a member of the 
Board of Health, and was for eleven years upon 
the School Committee. 

In 1879 Mr. Burpee was joined in marriage 
with Alice M. White, a native of Worcester, 
Mass. Her father, Leonard White, who was 
for many years a well-known marketman in 
that city, moved to Sterling, where he resided 
for some time. He died in Clinton at the age 
of seventy-eight years. The only child born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Burpee died in infancy. 

Mr. Burpee has been Master of Sterling 
Grange two years, lecturer two years, and 
treasurer for seven years. He is a charter 



3 o8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



member of the local lodge of Ancient Order 
of United Workmen, was formerly Receiver 
and Overseer, and is now its Master Work- 
man. He was at one time a reporter for the 
New England Homestead. He was one of the 
organizers of the Worcester East Agricultural 
Society, and for some years a trustee and has 
been president of the Farmers' Club. He 
attends the Congregational church. 




ALTER B. MELLEN, a leading 
agriculturist and retail milk dealer 
of Brookfield, son of Henry L. and 
Maria (Merrick) Mellen, was born here, Sep- 
tember 24, i860. The father, a son of Jere- 
miah Mellen, born in Pelham, Mass., came 
with the latter at the age of two years to the 
farm now occupied by Walter B. Mellen. 
Here he grew to manhood, and in the school 
not far distant acquired his early education. 
Later he was sent to Wilbraham Academy, 
from which he duly graduated. For a time be 
taught school. The greater part of his life 
was devoted to agriculture. He was a member 
of the First Congregational Unitarian Church 
of Brookfield. One of the most progressive 
men of the town, he was active in public 
affairs. He served on the Board of Assessors, 
was Overseer of the Poor and Selectmen; and 
he was also a member of the School Commit- 
tee, taking a special interest in educational 
matters. He died on December 25, 1 881. 
His wife, a native of Brimfield, was a daughter 
of the late Captain Thomas Merrick, of Stur- 
bridge, an officer in the militia and at onetime 
a Representative in General Court. Of their 
six children, four are living, namely: Sarah 
J., who is the wife of E. Harris Howland, of 
Spencer; George H., an attorney well known 
in Boston as counsel for the defunct West End 
Street Railway Company of that city; Frank 
L. , who is a teacher in the Worcester High 
School; and Walter B. , the subject of this 
sketch. Albert H. Mellen, who died at 
Smithville, N.C., in 1876, was a graduate of 
West Point, and had received his commission 
as Second Lieutenant in the United States 
army. The mother died in March, 1865. 



Mr. Mellen's education was obtained in the 
elementary schools and high school of Brook- 
field. He has devoted his working life to 
agriculture, and now owns the farm which was 
settled maany years ago by one of his great- 
grandfathers, Moses Hastings. He attends a 
milk route in the town, and has a large num- 
ber of customers. In 1S83 he was married to 
Lucy P., daughter of John W. Livermore, of 
this place, whose biography appears on an- 
other page of the Review. Like his father, 
he has been actively connected with the ad- 
ministration of local affairs, and has given 
much valuable service to the town. For sev- 
eral years he was Overseer of the Poor, and' 
he is now the chairman of the Board of High- 
way Commissioners. Politically, he is a Re- 
publican. A member of the First Congrega- 
tional Unitarian Church, he is an active 
worker in that body and one of its liberal 
supporters. Fraternally, he is a member of 
Hayden Lodge, F. & A. M. ; of the Royal 
Arcanum; and of Brookfield Grange, No. 174, 
P. of H., of which he has been the Master for 
three years. Both officially and in his private 
capacity he commands the respect of his 
townsmen. 




LIVER B. WYMAN, a prominent 
agriculturist and a substantial citi- 
zen of Worcester County, was born 
September 16, 1826, in the town 
of Shrewsbury, where he now resides. His 
parents were Seth, Jr., and Lucy (Baker) 
Wyman. He owns and occupies the house 
built by his great-grandfather, Colonel Ross 
Wyman, a native of Woburn, Mass., who came 
to Shrewsbury in 1746, one of the early set- 
tlers of this place. 

Ensign Wyman, of Woburn, father of Ross, 
greatly distinguished himself by his self-pos- 
session, fortitude, and valor at Lovewell's 
fight, so called. Colonel Ross Wyman was 
a farmer and gunsmith,, and in the latter ca- 
pacity he made muskets for General Ward. 
As commander of a company of Shrewsbury 
artillery minute-men, he served gallantly 
during the Revolutionary War. He was a 
typical representative of the Wyman family, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3°9 



possessing remarkable physical powers. It is 
said that he could easily pick up a barrel of 
cider and drink from the bung. An incident 
of his early life illustrates his strength, agil- 
ity, and courage. On one occasion, while 
driving to market with a load of fish, he was 
overtaken by a press-gang of seven men from 
a British man-of-war, bent upon forcing him 
into service. Rather objecting to their 
method of procedure as well as their errand, 
he seized a huge fish by the gills with both 
hands, and laid about him vigorously, until 
his would-be captors were glad to leave him. 
He lived to the advanced age of ninety-two 
years. 

Colonel Seth Wyman, son of Colonel Ross, 
succeeded his father in the ownership of the 
homestead property in Shrewsbury. He built 
the saw-mill and the grist-mill now in opera- 
tion here, and, in addition to general farming, 
was extensively engaged in lumbering. Colo- 
nel Seth Wyman was one of the solid men of 
the town, and served at various times as Se- 
lectman. 

Seth Wyman, Jr., son of Colonel Seth, was 
for some years engaged in mercantile pursuits; 
but on the death of his father he bought the 
interest of the other heirs in the ancestral 
estates, and afterward devoted himself to agri- 
cultural pursuits. He paid especial attention 
to dealing in cattle, which he gathered from 
all sections of the country and drove to the 
Brighton market. A man of great enterprise, 
he was vigorous and alert, keeping on the 
move from early morning until late at night, 
scarce giving up work until his death, at the 
age of seventy-seven years. To him and his 
wife, Lucy Baker, of Shrewsbury, ten children 
were born, one of whom died in infancy, and 
the following grew to mature life: John B. , 
Charles, Jane, Anna M., Oliver B., Lucy, 
Henry Seth, Mary, and Sarah. John B. 
Wyman superintended the building of the Illi- 
nois Central Railway. He served several years 
as Adjutant-general of Illinois. At the break- 
ing out of the late Civil War he took com- 
mand of the Thirteenth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, and was Acting Brigadier-general 
when shot from his horse and killed, while in 
command of troops at the siege of Vicksburg. 



Anna M. married Augustus Irving, of Hart- 
ford, Conn., who was for nearly three years, 
during the administration of President Pierce, 
Secretary of the American Legation at St. 
Petersburg. About the close of the year 1855 
Mr. Irving resigned his position, and left 
Russia. His wife met him in Paris. They 
spent several weeks visiting places of interest 
in France, England, and Scotland, and on 
January 23, 1856, sailed for New York on 
the ill-fated steamer "Pacific," which was 
never again heard from. Charles Wyman, 
one of the pioneers in construction of tele- 
graph lines, died some years ago in Minne- 
sota. Henry S. Wyman was a railroad man. 
He died in Shrewsbury in 1S66. Jane, de- 
ceased, married Henry Pratt, of this town. 
Lucy at the time of her death, in 1864, was 
a teacher in a private school in St. Louis. 

Oliver B. Wyman grew to manhood in 
Shrewsbury, and received his education in the 
public schools of the town. He was afterward 
for a number of years engaged, in company 
with his brother Charles, in the construction 
of telegraph lines, having headquarters at 
Hartford, Conn. In that capacity he built 
the first telegraph line along the P'itchburg 
Railroad, the lines from Burlington and from 
Rutland, Vt. , to Boston, the line from New 
London to Meriden, Conn., and others. In 
1850 he gave up the telegraph business and 
came home to Shrewsbury to take charge of 
the old homestead, which is one of the histori- 
cal places of the town. In early stage-coach 
days the house was kept as a tavern. In 185 1 
Mr. Wyman succumbed to the gold fever, and, 
going- to California, was there engaged in 
mining for a year and a half, returning then 
to his home. With the exception of fifteen 
months' military service, Mr. Wyman has 
since been extensively engaged in general 
farming and lumbering, in the latter business 
buying and clearing wood lots and timber 
lands, and manufacturing lumber, which he 
sells to home markets. His farm is one of 
the best improved in this vicinity, and is 
largely devoted, and with eminent success, to 
market gardening and dairying. Mr. Wyman 
enlisted in 1863 in the Fifty-first Massachu- 
setts Infantry, and was mustered out in 1S64, 



3io 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



having served fifteen months in North Caro- 
lina under General Foster. 

In politics Mr. Wyman is a straightforward 
Republican, prominent in the party, and has 
served acceptably as chairman of the Republi- 
can Town Committee. He has filled the vari- 
ous local offices, from Field Driver to Select- 
man, and on the latter board has been 
chairman a number of years. He has also 
rendered good service as one of the Library 
Committee; and in 1878 he represented his 
district in the State legislature, where he 
served on the Committee on Parishes and 
Religious Societies. Fraternally, he is a 
Master Mason, belonging to Montecute 
Lodge, F. & A. M. ; and he is likewise a 
member of Shrewsbury Grange, P. of H. 

On- January 31, 1852, Mr. Wyman married 
Miss Hannah L. Carter, a descendant in the 
eighth generation of the Rev. Thomas Carter, 
the first ordained and settled minister of Wo- 
burn, Mass. Their only child is Miss Agnes 
Wyman. 



"tp)TENRY N. BIGELOW, a retired 
I I manufacturer of Clinton and the 
jig I treasurer of the local gas company, 

^—"' was born in Lancaster (now Clin- 
ton) on October 6, 1839, son of Horatio N. 
and Emily (Worcester) Bigelow. His grand- 
father, Ephraim Bigelow, son of Abel, was 
a wheelwright and chair-maker by trade, cul- 
tivated a small farm, and died in 1837. 
Ephraim's wife, Polly Brigham Bigelow, sur- 
vived him eighteen years. 

Horatio N. Bigelow early began to be self- 
supporting. In youth he worked upon his 
father's farm and in the neighboring mills. 
When twenty years of age he became the over- 
seer of a small factory, started by his father 
on the banks of the Nashua. In 1836 he was 
called to Shirley as superintendent of a cotton 
factory there. From that town he came to 
Clinton in company with his younger brother, 
Erastus B. Bigelow, and secured possession of 
the water privileges on South Meadow Brook. 
In the early part of 1838 the Clinton Carpet 
Company was duly incorporated, the incorpo- 
rators being John Wright, H. N. Bigelow, 



and Israel Longley. Six years later the Lan- 
caster Mills Company was incorporated for the 
purpose of manufacturing ginghams. Mr. 
Bigelow continued the management of the mill 
until 1849. In the building of the town he 
was the master spirit. He was the first Post- 
master of Clinton, and was its Representative 
to General Court during the first two years 
after it was incorporated as a town. On Sep- 
tember 24, 1834, he was married to Emily 
Worcester. Of their four children, two died 
before the father. The two remaining are 
Henry N. and Charles B. , the latter being 
manufacturing agent of the Bigelow Carpet 
Company. 

Henry N. Bigelow was educated in the 
common schools of Clinton and at Eastbamp- 
ton Seminary. After leaving school he went 
into the Clinton Company's mills, later the 
Bigelow Carpet Company. After the death of 
his father he acted as agent until 1882, when 
he resigned. He has also been a director of 
the First National Bank and a trustee of the 
savings-bank, which positions he resigned 
after some fifteen years of service. Since 
then he has been connected with the gas com- 
pany, of which he is now treasurer and man- 
ager. His home, which is in Clinton, was 
built in 1867. In 1866 he was united in mar- 
riage with Clarissa, daughter of Franklin 
Forbes, who was formerly agent of the Lancas- 
ter Mills. Of the five children born to him 
and Mrs. Bigelow, three are living, namely: 
Henry F. , who married a Miss Davis, of 
Worcester, and is an architect; Horatio N., 
who is in the gas company referred to; and 
Charles Willard, who is in business in Boston. 
Mrs. Clarissa Bigelow died after ten years of 
married life, being then thirty-five years of 
age. The present Mrs. Bigelow, in maiden- 
hood Cornelia W. Lathrop, of Boston, is the 
mother of Nina and Rosamond L. Bigelow. 

In politics Mr. Bigelow is a Republican. 
He has been a trustee of the Public Library 
since it was founded, a member of the Ceme- 
tery Committee, Road Commissioner, and a 
member of the School Committee for eight 
years. A Mason of the thirty-second degree, 
he belongs to Trinity Lodge, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; to the Council and Chapter of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3ii 



Clinton; to Worcester County Knights Temp- 
lar; and to the Consistory. He has been a 
director of the Boston, Clinton & Fitchburg 
and of the Worcester & Nashua Railroads. 
He and his family are Episcopalians and mem- 
bers of the Church of the Good Shepherd, 
which he serves in the capacity of senior 
warden. He remembers Clinton when there 
were only fifteen hundred people in the town, 
and when his father was its leading man. 



~[T\ WIGHT R. SCOTT, City Weigher 
I =1 of Worcester for the last ten years, 
_ I^V was born in Worthington, Mass., 
April 26, 1836, son of Francis Arva 
and Melinda (DeWolf) Scott. His great- 
grandfather, Elijah Scott, who came to this 
country from Scotland, owned an immense 
tract of land on the shores of Lake Champlain 
in New York State. There his grandfather, 
Rufus Scott, was reared. Rufus, a deaf-mute, 
was educated in the school for deaf-mutes at 
Hartford, Conn. A man of bright, keen in- 
tellect, he had a successful business career 
despite his affliction. He married Melinda 
Gurrillon, who was of Scotch descent. She 
was a woman of great size, weighing three 
hundred pounds. Her death, at the age of 
fifty-two, resulted from injuries received when 
she was accidentally thrown from a wagon. 
She left three sons and three daughters, of 
whom the sons and a daughter are living. 
These are: Sophronia, who resides in Gill, 
her native place, and who is still active and in 
full possession of her faculties at the advanced 
age of ninety-two years; Francis A., the 
father of Dwigbt R. ; and Zimri and Henry, 
who live in Gill. Rufus Scott died in 1865, 
and was buried in the cemetery at Gill, of 
which he owned a quarter. 

Francis Arva Scott now resides in Willi- 
mantic, Conn. He and his wife, who was a 
native of New London, Conn., had thirteen 
children, of whom the subject of this sketch is 
the eldest. The others were : Charles, who 
died at the age of seven years; Eunice, who 
married a Mr. Summers, and died at the age 
of twenty-two, leaving two sons; Lewis, a vet- 
eran of the Civil War, now residing at 9 Rus- 



sell Street, this city; William, who is at 
Fortress Monroe; Amelia, who died at the 
age of fifteen ; Emma, who is the wife of 
D. L. Whittaker, of Willimantic, Conn. ; 
Charles, who died in February, 1896, leaving 
four sons; Dexter, who died at the age of 
seven years; George, who resides in this city; 
Ella, whose death from diphtheria occurred 
at the same time as those of Dexter and 
another of the children ; Clarence, who resides 
in New York City; and a daughter that died 
in infancy. The father and five sons were in 
the war at one time. The mother died in 
1 891, at the age of seventy-nine. 

Dwight R. Scott grew to manhood in Gill, 
where he obtained a common-school education. 
At the age of sixteen he began learning the 
pail-maker's trade, at which he worked until 
his enlistment on September 6, 1861. He 
had volunteered, together with his father and 
his brothers Lewis and William, in Company 
G, Tenth Massachusetts Infantry. All saw 
gallant fighting, and honorably sustained their 
part. Lewis, William, and Dwight were 
wounded. After receiving his discharge Mr. 
Scott engaged in pail-making. At the end of 
a year and a half be started a saw-mill busi- 
ness, and continued it subsequently for fifteen 
years. 

Mr. Scott was first married on November 
2 7> 1857, to Caroline Turner, who bore him 
two children — Flora and William. Flora is 
now the wife of Robert Kenniston, of Upton, 
Mass., and the mother of two children. Mr. 
Scott's second marriage was contracted on 
April 13, 1871, with Caroline H. Tisdale, of 
Dedham. She has borne three children, 
namely: Warren A. Scott, who is a civil en- 
gineer; Louise A., who teaches in the public 
schools of Worcester, the ninth grade; and 
Eunice, who is a stenographer with the Whit- 
comb Envelope Company of Worcester. One 
of the organizers of the Union Veteran 
Legion, Mr. Scott has always been its Quarter- 
master. He is a Master Mason, and has been 
a life-long Democrat. His children are Con- 
gregational ists and members of the Christian 
Endeavor Society. The family has resided in 
its present home at 64 Locust Avenue, Lake 
View, since 1880. 



312 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



AMES RICE, who was, until his retire- 
ment from active work, a prosperous 
farmer of Barre, was born in this town, 
January 27, 1822, son of Lemuel and 
Hannah (Allen) Rice. His paternal great- 
grandfather, Jotham Rice, who was born Feb- 
ruary 17, 1696, came to Barre from Worces- 
ter previous to 1749, and, settling upon wild 
land in the northern part of the township, re- 
sided here for the rest of his life. Jotham 
married Mary, daughter of Ralph Earl. 
James Rice, the grandfather, was born on the 
Jotham Rice farm about the year 1746. Ac- 
cording" to the deed he then received, he 
bought ten acres of the present Rice home- 
stead in 1766, and afterward added more land. 
He served as a volunteer in the Revolutionary 
War, and took an active part in public affairs, 
serving as a Selectman. His death occurred 
July 21, 1832. In 1770 he first married Su- 
sanna Cutting, who died in 1780, aged thirty- 
five years. A second marriage, on July 12, 
1787, wedded him to Ruth White, who died 
February 12, 1837, aged ninety-one. He at- 
tended the Unitarian church. 

Lemuel Rice, father of the subject of this 
sketch, was born December 12, 1772. When 
a young man he went to Vermont and took up 
new land. After some time spent there, en- 
gaged in stock dealing, he returned to' the 
homestead, and died here, September 21, 1846. 
He married Mrs. Hannah Allen, a native of 
Barre and a widow, who died July 23, 1867, 
aged eighty-eight years. They attended the 
Unitarian church, of which she was a mem- 
ber. Their children were: Allen, born Sep- 
tember 26, 1806, who died in January, 1885; 
Susan S. , born May 7, 1808, who married 
Luke Hammond, and resides in Boston; Han- 
nah, born April' 22, 181 1, who is the widow 
of Josiah D. Howe, and now resides in Barre; 
Harriet, born November 27, 181 3, who is no 
longer living; Lemuel M. , born January 21, 
1817, who died July 31, 1821; Alice, born 
January 8, 1819, who died June 18, 1852; 
James, the subject of this sketch ; and Lem- 
uel P. Rice, born April 29, 1825, who resides 
in Barre. 

James Rice was educated in the schools of 
this town and at the Keene (N. H.) Academy. 



His active life has been spent on the home 
farm, which he cultivated industriously until 
his retirement. On December 7, 1848, he 
married Sarah Hawes, who was born in this 
town in September, 1822. His only son, 
Warren H., died at the age of two years. 
Mrs. Rice passed away October 10, 1877. 
She was a member of the old Unitarian parish. 
Mr. Rice resides on the farm now owned by 
his nephew, James A. Rice. In politics he 
has acted with the Republican party since its 
formation, and he was Selectman for one year. 
He is a member of the old Unitarian parish. 



AMES A. RICE, of Barre, who is now 
carrying on the farm formerly owned 
by his uncle, James Rice, was born in 
this town, January 6, 1869, son of 
Lemuel P. and Lucia (Dunton) Rice. His 
great-grandfather was James Rice, and his 
grandparents were Lemuel and Hannah (Nye) 
Allen Rice, of Barre. (A more detailed ac- 
count of the family will be found in the biog- 
raphy of James Rice.) 

Lemuel P. Rice, born April 29, 1825, was 
educated in the schools of Barre, and reared 
upon the farm of James Rice. After the 
death of his father he and his brother James 
carried on the home farm for a time. At the 
age of thirty-seven Lemuel sold his interest to 
his brother, and, moving to Hubbardston, 
Mass., resided there for a short time. Re- 
turning to Barre in 1865, he bought his pres- 
ent farm of one hundred and seventy-six acres, 
and has since been engaged in its cultivation. 
He makes a specialty of dairy farming, keep- 
ing about thirty head of Durham cows. 
Other land owned by him makes his total es- 
tate two hundred and sixty-one acres. Politi- 
cally, he is a Republican, and he has rendered 
efficient service to the town as a Selectman. 
He is still strong and active, and his farm 
and buildings are among the best in his section 
of the town. His wife, Lucia, born in Hub- 
bardston, March 2, 1841, and whom he mar- 
ried in 1863, died September 19, 1S79. She 
left three children, namely: Susie D. , who 
resides at home; James A., the subject of this 
sketch; and Louise S. Rice, a school teacher 




JAMES RICE. 



PUBLIC 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3>S 



in Barre. The father attends the Congrega- 
tional church. 

James A. Rice has been engaged in farm- 
ing and lumbering since he left school. The 
old Rice farm, which he is now cultivating, is 
one of the largest in Barre. It contains five 
hundred and forty acres of excellent land, well 
adapted for dairy purposes. His stock aver- 
ages fifty head of the Durham breed, of which 
thirty are milch cows. He also raises thor- 
oughbred horses of a mixed Morgan and Eng- 
lish strain, having upon his farm specimens of 
the sixth generation bred on the home farm. 
From one hundred to one hundred and fifty 
tons of hay are cut by him annually. The 
house, which was built in 1785 and is still in 
a good state of preservation, contains a fire- 
place six by four feet, capable of holding a 
log five feet long and two feet in diameter. 
The interior is ceiled with white pine boards, 
thirty-two inches wide; and the old clock and 
desk, which belonged to the great-grandfather 
of Mr. Rice, are still a part of the furniture. 
An old elm-tree standing in front of the 
house, and which was set out by the original 
settler, is thought to be about one hundred 
and twenty-five years old. Mr. Rice is not 
married. In politics he is a Republican, and 
he has performed his share of service to the 
town as an assessor and in other offices. 
He attends the Congregational church. 




^HANDLER JACKSON GREENE, 
a leading dairy farmer of West Au- 
burn, son of Samuel Chandler and 
Martha (Jackson) Greene, was born 
in Rutland, this county, on November 2, 
1848. His great-grandfather, who was the 
eldest of nine children, was born on October 
18, 1745. The grandfather, Jeduthun, born 
in 1785, who died in 1871, was a farmer by 
occupation. He was married in 1809 to Betsy 
Stone Dadmun, who was born on August 1, 
1788, and who bore him nine children, 
namely: George S. , on March 2, 1810; John 
William, November 10, 1811; Betsy Jane, 
September 12, 181 3, who is now the widow 
Whiting, residing in Brookfield ; Harriet Dad- 
mun, January 24, 1816, who was the wife of 



Charles King, and died on September 25, 
1864; Ruth Maria, May 1, 1818; Charles 
Jeduthun, July 9, 1820; Samuel C, Septem- 
ber 24, 1822; James Estabrook, May 28, 1825; 
and James Slayton, April 21, 1834. Of 
these, Charles, George, John William, Sam- 
uel C, and the three daughters grew to matu- 
rity and had families. Mrs. Whiting is the 
only surviving daughter. An old rifle, which 
is one of the cherished heirlooms of the fam- 
ily, was bought in 1816 by Jeduthun and Betsy 
Greene. 

Samuel Chandler Greene was a lifelong 
agriculturist in Rutland, on the farm left by 
his father. During the Civil War he enlisted 
for nine months in Company B, Fifty-first 
Massachusetts Regiment of Infantry. He 
died in Rutland in 1888. His wife, Martha, 
born in Vermont on June 28, 1S26, was the 
mother of five children, namely: Chandler J., 
the subject of this biography; Jane, who died 
at the age of twelve years; Eliza, who is the 
wife of Sumner Strout, of Maine; Ada Maria, 
who died in infancy; and Stella A., who lives 
in Worcester. 

Chandler Jackson Greene received a public- 
school education, and subsequently remained 
at home until he was eighteen years of age. 
He then began working out for himself at 
farm labor, and for eight months was on a 
farm at Lansingburg, N.Y. , where he received 
twenty-five dollars a month. Returning after 
this to Massachusetts, he drove a team for 
the next year and a half in Coldbrook and 
subsequently from Barre to Worcester. Then 
he was in teaming in Worcester with from 
one to four teams until May, 1894, when he 
purchased the Loomis Stone farm of two hun- 
dred acres, one of the finest in this section, 
for which he paid twenty thousand dollars. 
Mr. Greene keeps about fifty head of stock, in- 
cluding from four to seven horses, and a dairy 
of from thirty to thirty-six high-grade cows. 
In 1894 his large barn, one hundred and forty 
by forty-six feet, with the tower, was built by 
Darling Brothers. A silo, having a capacity 
of one hundred and ninety tons, was built in 
1896. Prior to September, 1897, he had a 
milk route, but since that time he sells milk 
at the door. 



3 i6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



In September, 1873, Mr. Greene was 
married to Mary E. Wheeler, only child of 
Hiram and Jane (Smith) Wheeler, all of Rut- 
land. Mr. Wheeler died forty-five years ago, 
leaving his widow and his year-old daughter. 
The mother subsequently married Paul 
Wheeler, a brother of her first husband, by 
whom she had a son, H. Edward Wheeler, 
now a farmer in Rutland. She died in Sep- 
tember, 1 88 1, aged forty-five. Mr. and Mrs. 
Greene have been the parents of four children, 
as follows: Paul S. , who was born on Novem- 
ber 2, 1874, and is now a student in the Poly- 
technic School at Worcester; H. Everett, who 
was born on April 25, 1881, and is now at- 
tending school in West Auburn; Harrie L., 
who was born on October 26, 1883, and is now 
attending the district school; and Ruth E., 
who was born on April 5, 1891. In politics 
Mr. Greene is a Republican. He is one of 
the solid men of this town, and has the confi- 
dence of the community. 



"^rJ)/lLLIAM H. BLOO 
VjSV °f tne Lancaster I 
**> »"* men, was born in 



BLOOD, the chairman 
Board of Select- 
Groton, Mass., 
September 21, 1843, son of Thomas F. and 
Caroline E. (Parker) Blood. His paternal 
grandfather, Thomas, who was also a native of 
Groton, served as a Captain in the State mi- 
litia, and carried on general farming, dying 
when fifty-nine years old. 

Thomas F. Blood, one of the nine children 
of Thomas, and likewise a native of Groton, 
succeeded to the homestead, and resided there 
until 1845, when he moved to Lancaster. His 
last days were spent in this town, and he lived 
to be seventy years old. Caroline E. Blood, 
his wife, was born in Groton. She had six 
children; namely, Charles E., William H., 
Angelo P., Caroline E., Ellen F., and Lucius 
M. Blood. Her death occurred at the age of 
fifty years. Both parents were members of 
the Congregational church. 

William H. Blood has resided in Lancaster 
since he was two years old. His education 
was completed in the high school. While yet 
a young man he turned his attention to agri- 
culture, and upon reaching his majority he 



purchased his present farm of twenty-seven 
acres. Later he bought other real estate, 
which he still owns. He is one of the most 
successful general farmers in this locality. 
For a number of years he was connected with 
the Lancaster Creamery, which produced a 
large amount of superior butter annually. In 
politics he supports the Republican party. 
His public services have been varied, and 
marked by an earnest desire to keep up with 
the march of improvement. He served as Tax 
Collector for the years 1868, 1869, and 1870. 
He has been Selectman for the greater part of 
the time since 1879, and he is now its chair- 
man. For four years he has been a Road 
Commissioner, and Superintendent of Streets 
for twelve years. At present he is a member 
of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

In 1866 Mr. Blood was joined in marriage 
with Mary E. Priest, daughter of Levi Priest, 
a prosperous farmer of Shirley, Mass. Mrs. 
Blood has been the mother of eight children, 
three of whom died in infancy. The survivors 
are: Alice M. , the wife of Sereno Goodnow, 
who is in the employ of the Thayers as a farm 
assistant, and has two children — Edith and 
Ellen; George H., who married Florence Mc- 
Cloud, and is in the oil business; Arthur W. , 
who is married and resides in Lancaster; 
Nellie M. ; and Edgar M. Blood. Edgar is 
attending school. A member of the Congre- 
gational church, Mr. Blood is an active worker 
upon the Parish and Church Committees. 
The family is identified with the church and 
its Sunday-school. 



OSEPH COUTU, of the firm Fontaine 
& Coutu, general merchants of Worces- 
ter, was born in St. Felix de Valois, 
Province of Quebec, June 22, 1858, his 
parents being Charles and Priscilla (Malihot) 
Coutu. Six generations ago the Coutus lived 
in Corbie, Picardy, France. Their first rep- 
resentative in this country was Francois Cottu 
de Lavaltrie, who was here in 1680. About 
1794 the name was changed to Coutu. Mr. 
Coutu's great-grandfather, Ardouin Coutu, was 
a farmer and land-owner, and lived in Canada. 
Alexis Coutu, the grandfather, who was a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3i7 



native of St. Elizabeth, Province of Quebec, 
born on November 29, 1798, died in 1843. 
Of bis five children, three sons and a daughter 
reached maturity. His wife was still a young 
woman when she died, and his death happened 
five years later. During their minority the 
children were cared for by an uncle, who was 
made the administrator of the estate. Three 
of them subsequently went to other parts of 
Canada; while Edward, the youngest, came to 
the States about the year 1852, settling in this 
county, where he engaged in the poultry busi- 
ness. Charles Coutu, who was born on April 
30, 1830, at St. Elizabeth, is still living 
there, active and in good health. His wife, 
Priscilla, whom he married on August 19, 
1 85 1, has been the mother of twelve children. 
Of these, seven are living, namely: Treffle, 
who is engaged in farming in Canada; John 
Louis, also in Canada, who has operated a 
cheese factory with much success; Joseph 
Coutu, the subject of this sketch; Alexis, who 
is a farmer in Canada; Rose Anna, now Sister 
Mary Priscilla of a convent in Cohoes, N.Y. ; 
Eugenie, the wife of Charles Frappier, resi- 
dent in Canada; and Octavia, who married 
Leo Minville, of Canada. Both parents reside 
on the homestead farm, leading a somewhat 
retired life. 

Joseph Coutu attended the convent school 
for a time and subsequently the Normal 
School in Montreal. When twenty years of 
age he came to New England, and began 
clerking in a grocery store of Woonsocket, 
R.I., remaining in that position until 1887. 
Since then he has been in the grocery and 
provision business in Worcester at 136 Wash- 
ington Street, in partnership with Mr. Fon- 
taine. The firm has also a store at 137-137^ 
Some Street. Both partners give their full 
attention to their large and increasing busi- 
ness, dividing their time between the two 
stores. They have the full confidence of the 
buying public, and are looked upon as thor- 
oughly representative men among the ten or 
twelve thousand French-Canadians of Worces- 
ter. The relations of the partners are of the 
most pleasant character. Both gentlemen and 
their families are members of St. Joseph's 
Church. 



In politics Mr. Coutu takes an independent 
course. On September 22, 1884, he married 
Louise Remillard, who died here in 1891, 
leaving no children. He was married again 
on May 15, 1897, to Emma Bergeron, a daugh- 
ter of Peter Bergeron, of Woonsocket. Born 
in Saratoga, N.Y., she was educated in the 
public schools of that city. 




USTIN HOWARD, Government Claim 
Agent, Notary Public, and Justice of 
the Peace, a well-known citizen of 
Milford, Mass., is a native of this 
place, and was born on October 16, 1839, son 
of Albert and Hannah D. (Howe) Howard. 
He received his education in a district school 
in Milford, a private school at Hopedale, and 
at Chester Academy, Chester, Vt. , where he 
fitted for college. In the spring of 1858 he 
went to New Bedford, and, shipping for a 
cruise on a whaling vessel, was gone two 
years. In April, 1861, on the breaking out of 
the Rebellion, he enlisted in the Boston 
Tigers Company, and for six weeks was sta- 
tioned at Fort Warren in Boston Harbor. He 
then joined Company G, of Milford, which be- 
came a part of the famous Fortieth New York 
Regiment, and went to the front in Virginia. 
On account of physical disability, however, he 
was discharged on the last day of August, 
1861. 

Not discouraged, and desirous of serving his 
country, he made a second effort, and in 
March, 1862, was enlisted at Boston, Mass., 
in the navy as an ordinary seaman, and went 
into duty on the gunboat "Lexington" at 
Cairo, 111., on the Mississippi River. In 
September of that year he was promoted to 
be master's mate, United States navy, and 
was ordered for duty on the United States 
gunboat "Signal. " On both boats he was in 
active warfare, and witnessed many stirring 
events. He was present at the destruction of 
the United States gunboat "Mound City," 
when a hundred and fifty men were scalded to 
death at the battle of St. Charles, on White 
River, Arkansas, June 17, 1862; and he took 
part in the operations which eventually 
brought about the opening up of the Missis- 



3-i8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



sippi River. His boat was ordered to take 
torpedoes out of the Yazoo River during the 
campaign of Vicksburg, which was a task diffi- 
cult to perform. He was present when the 
fleet ran the blockade at Vicksburg. He was 
at the battle of Arkansas Post, or " Fort 
Hinman," on Arkansas River, where seven 
thousand rebels were surrendered to Admiral 
Porter in January, 1863; also on the Yazoo 
Pass expedition in Mississippi in February, 
1863, and in several other engagements during 
the war of the Rebellion. In May, 1863, he 
was again discharged for disability, and re- 
turned home; but in February, 1865, having 
partly recovered his health, he was accepted as 
a private in Company A of the Second Massa- 
chusetts Cavalry. He was with that company 
in the vicinity of Fairfax Court-house, Va., 
at the time the war closed, and was there dis- 
charged July 20, 1865. 

Coming home again, he remained here for a 
year, securing much needed recuperation, and 
then entered the employ of the Metropolitan 
Railroad in Boston, where he remained for 
about five years. He was a conductor on the 
Harlem Railroad in New York for nearly five 
years. After that he was engaged as a travel- 
ling salesman until 1881, being successively 
employed by the following firms: I. & J. H. 
Joseph, of New York; Henry Sawyer & Co., 
of Boston ; and Henry Callender & Co., whole- 
sale grocery house of Boston. In this line of 
business he was most successful ; but in 1881 
he retired from the road and took up his pres- 
ent business in Milford as United States Pen- 
sion, Bounty, and Government Claim Agent, 
Notary Public, and Justice of the Peace. 

Mr. Howard has a large clientage, and has 
procured pensions for men in nearly every 
State in the Union. He was the first Auditor 
elected in the town of Milford. In politics 
he has always been an ardent Republican. 
He is a zealous Grand Army man and a mem- 
ber of Post No. 22, of which he has been chap- 
lain and Sergeant Major. He is also a 
member of Montgomery Lodge, F. & A. M. 

Mr. Howard's first wife was Alice Maria 
Arnold, of Woonsocket, R.I. He is now liv- 
ing with his second wife, formerly S. Lovice 
Griswold, of Milford. Mr. and Mrs. Howard 



are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 




LBRIDGE GERRY WARREN was 
for many years prosperously engaged in 
the tanning industry in his native 
town of Auburn, Mass., where he is now liv- 
ing, a venerable octogenarian, retired from 
business. He resides in the house that has 
been his home from the day of his birth in the 
early part of the century, March 27, 18 10. 
His parents were Samuel and Sally (Gould- 
ing) Warren. 

The Warren name is one of the oldest in 
New England, its history in Massachusetts 
beginning with the arrival of Richard Warren 
in the " Mayflower" in 1620. Other Warren 
immigrants followed, whether akin to Richard 
and to each other or not, we are unable to say. 
The branch of the family represented by Mr. 
Elbridge G. Warren is said to be connected 
with that to which belonged General Joseph 
Warren of Revolutionary fame, who was a de- 
scendant of Peter Warren, of Boston, 1659. 

Mr. Elbridge G. Warren's great-grand- 
father, Ebenezer Warren, who was born in 
1714, settled in Leicester in 1744, and died 
there in 1800. His son Jonathan, who was 
born in Leicester on November 27, 1750, was 
twice married, and had a family of ten chil- 
dren. He died about 1S25. A fine monu- 
ment in Greenville Cemetery in Leicester 
marks his last resting-place. 

Samuel Warren, son of Jonathan by his wife, 
Martha Bemis, of Spencer, and father of the 
subject of this sketch, was born in Leicester 
in 1779. He married young, and was only 
twenty-one years old when his son Elbridge, 
who was the second child, was born. His 
wife, Sally, was born on this farm, daughter of 
Jonah and Grace (Knowlton) Goulding, the 
latter a native of Shrewsbury; and she came 
with her parents to this house when about two 
years old. Samuel and Sally Warren had 
seven children, six sons and one daughter, all 
of whom grew to maturity. Of these, El- 
bridge G. was the second-born, and is the only 
survivor. The daughter, Sarah, died at the 
age of eighteen. The sons all married and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3 l 9 



reared families, and between sixty and seventy 
of their descendants gather here annually to 
hold a reunion. This farm was settled upon 
in Revolutionary times by Jonah Goulding, 
Joseph Knowlton settling near by at about the 
same time. For twenty-five years Grace 
Knowlton Goulding cooked the meals in the 
old house still standing a few rods distant, and 
brought them here. The tannery now oper- 
ated by Mr. Warren's nephews was purchased 
by a Goulding of Simeon Southworth. For 
thirty-nine years prior to 1S77 the business 
was conducted by Elbridge G. Warren and his 
brother John; and from 1877, when the for- 
mer retired, to 1891, when the latter died, it 
was conducted by John Warren & Sons. 
Since their father's death the sons, J. G., 
Richard H., and Waterman A., have contin- 
ued the business. After the original building 
was burned in 1863, a new building was 
erected, and that also was burned in 1893. 
The present tannery, which is situated in 
West Auburn, about a mile distant from the 
place where the former buildings stood, was 
then built. 

Mr. Elbridge G. Warren was married on 
April 9, 1834, to Lydia E. , daughter of Isaac 
and Lydia (Brigbam) Stone, of Oxford, the 
mother a native of Grafton. Mrs. Warren 
died in 1894, at the age of seventy-seven, after 
having lived almost sixty years of wedded life. 
She was the mother of eight children, the eld- 
est two of whom died in childhood. The six 
living are: Elbridge, Jr., Mary L. , Sherman 
FL, Lydia, Elmira W., and Sally A. The 
first named of these resides in Brattleboro, 
Vt. Mary L. is the wife of E. H. Newton, of 
Auburn, and the mother of three children. 
Sherman FL, also a resident of Brattleboro, 
has one son. Lydia A. Warren, who is a 
trained nurse by profession, lives at home with 
her aged father. Elmira is the widow of 
Edwin F. Ryder, and is matron of the Worces- 
ter City Hospital, of which her sister Lydia is 
a graduate. Mrs. Ryder has one daughter. 
Sally is the wife of S. W. Edgett, of Brattle- 
boro, Vt. 

In religious belief Mr. Warren is a Baptist. 
He is nominally a Republican in politics, but 
has independent views in regard to many mat- 



ters. He was a Jackson Democrat in former 
days, and cast his first Presidential vote for 
Martin Van Buren. He has served in various 
town offices, and in 1862 he was a Representa- 
tive in the General Court of Massachusetts. 
He is still, at the age of eighty-eight, compar- 
atively vigorous in mind and body. 



James 



NELSON BALL, superintendent of 
the Lancaster Mills of Boylston, 
Mass., was born in Holden on August 
18, 1S47. He is the only son of 
E. and Abigail (Howe) Ball. His 
great-grandfather Ball, whose name was 
Elijah, was one of the early settlers of 
Boylston, coming here on to a farm. His 
grandfather, Jonah Ball, who was born in 
Boylston, was brought up on the farm and 
educated in the public schools. In early man- 
hood he worked for a few years in Provi- 
dence, R.I. ; but subsequently he returned 
to Boylston, and died here at the age of sev- 
enty-two. Jonah Ball's second wife, whose 
maiden name was Mary Calwell, died when 
their son James was six years of age. She 
was the mother of four children, all of whom 
grew to maturity, James E. being the only 
one now living. 

James E. Ball was born in Providence, R.I. 
He passed his boyhood in Dedham, and at- 
tended the schools of that town. When four- 
teen years of age he came to Boylston, and re- 
sided here until his marriage, engaged in tripe 
making. After his marriage he went to Hol- 
den, and worked as butcher and marketman ; 
and from there he went to Vermont, where he 
remained for a short time. From Vermont he 
came to Clinton, and was employed in the 
meat and tripe business for five years. Sub- 
sequent to this he was on a farm in Sterling 
for nine years, and then, in 1865, he returned 
to Boylston. Later he sold his farm there 
and went to Boylston Centre, where he is now 
living. Mr. James E. Ball is a public- 
spirited citizen, and has taken an active inter- 
est in the affairs of the town. For three 
years he was Assessor and for a number of 
years Road Commissioner. In religious views 
he is a Unitarian, in politics a Democrat. 



3 2 ° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



His wife, Abigail, is a native of Sterling, 
where her father, Captain Silas Howe, Jr., 
was a well-known carpenter and farmer. 
James and Abigail Ball are the parents of four 
children, namely: J. Nelson; Hattie; Abbie, 
now Mrs. John N. Flagg; and Mary, now 
Mrs. John Keogh. 

J. Nelson Ball received his early education 
in the common schools of Clinton and Sterling, 
and subsequently attended Appleton Academy 
at New Ipswich, N.H. He remained with 
his parents until t-wenty-one years of age, and 
then went into the butchering business in 
Worcester, where he remained until his mar- 
riage. Coming to the Lancaster Mills to as- 
sist in the reconstruction, he began as a day 
laborer, and from that position worked up to 
be machinist. After a time he went to West 
Boylston to the mill of Eli Holbrook as ma- 
chinist. After three years spent there he re- 
turned to the Lancaster Mills, and for two 
years was machinist here. At the end of that 
time he became overseer, which position he 
held for six years. Going then to Barre, he 
assumed the management of J. Edwin Smith's 
cotton-mill, located in Smithville, which is a 
part of the town of Barre. Five years later, 
in 1893, he returned to the Lancaster Mills as 
superintendent; and he has since filled this 
important position with ability and to the 
entire satisfaction of his employers. He has 
full direction of the one hundred workmen who 
are employed in the manufacture of yarn. 
When Mr. Ball first came here the mill con- 
tained only seven thousand spindles; and 
to-day there are more than double that num- 
ber, the other departments having been cor- 
respondingly enlarged. Mr. Ball's rise from 
the position of laborer to that of superin- 
tendent in a large mill is a notable illustra- 
tion of what may be accomplished by a man 
of energy and ability who is willing to devote 
his time and attention faithfully to his busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Ball was married in 1870 to Julia Wil- 
son, who was born in Torrington, Conn., the 
daughter of James Wilson, formerly a shoe- 
maker in that town. Mr. Wilson came to 
Boylston when his daughter was a child, and 
spent the rest of his life here, engaged in 



farming. He had a family of fourteen chil- 
dren. Mr. and Mrs. Ball have one child — 
Grace, who married Harry Parker, a merchant 
of Coldbrook Springs. 

In politics Mr. Ball is a Republican. He 
is a public-spirited man, and has served the 
town in various positions of trust and respon- 
sibility. For nine years he was Constable, 
for three years a member of the Board of Se- 
lectmen. After this first period of service he 
was again elected Selectman successively in 
1894, 1895, 1896, 1897, and 1898, and during 
all these five years has been chairman of the 
board and for the same length of time chair- 
man of the Board of Overseers of the Poor, 
also chairman of the Board of Health. Pre- 
vious to 1896 he served three years as a mem- 
ber of the School Board, and at the expiration 
of his first term was reappointed for three years 
longer, this being until 1899. He is also at 
the present time Road Commissioner for this 
district, No. 2, and first fire warden of the 
town. Fraternally, Mr. Ball is a member of 
Centennial Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of West Boylston, and was formerly 
in the Lancaster Lodge of Clinton. He has 
served in the offices up to that of Vice-Grand, 
and has refused to accept nominations for the 
higher offices. He has been a member of the 
Boylston Grange for a number of years, and 
has held the office of Overseer in that body. 
Mr. Ball attends the Orthodox church in 
Boylston. 






DDISON J. BEMIS, one of the best 
lown blacksmiths in Worcester, was 
born in Framingham, Mass., Octo- 
ber 4, 1822, son of Jacob and 
Eunice (Rice) Bemis. The father, a native 
of Massachusetts, when a young man was em- 
ployed in a Boston market. Later he was en- 
gaged in farming in Framingham for some 
years. From that town he removed to South- 
boro, Mass., where he became prosperous in 
the latter part of his life, and served in some 
of the town offices. By Eunice, his first wife, 
who was a native of Holden, Mass., there were 
three sons and four daughters. Born of his 
second marriage were two children, of whom 




STO; 



JOHN A. FAYERWEATHER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



323 



one is deceased. The survivor, Augustine, 
resides in Connecticut. His mother died in 
that State in 1895, aged ninety-two. She was 
an excellent woman, who treated her step-chil- 
dren as her own; and the subject of this sketch 
visited her frequently in her old age. The 
father died in 1867, aged seventy-six years. 

At an early age Addison J. Bemis began to 
assist his father in farming. When fifteen 
years old he commenced an apprenticeship of 
three and a half years to the blacksmith's trade 
with Winthrop Arnold, a worthy man, an ex- 
cellent mechanic, and a good employer. 
After finishing his apprenticeship he followed 
general blacksmithing for some years. After- 
ward he established himself in business in 
Worcester with borrowed capital amounting 
to one thousand dollars, which he paid in due 
time. For the past forty years he has been 
the leading horseshoer in this city. Like 
others, he has had his misfortunes, and on one 
occasion his shop was destroyed by fire, caus- 
ing a loss of four thousand dollars ; but despite 
these adversities his energy and strength have 
enabled him to acquire affluence. Mr. Bemis 
is regarded as one of the most vigorous men of 
his years in Worcester. For some years past 
he has been in the habit of making annual 
visits to Maine, and though not an expert 
hunter he has secured deer and other game, as 
well as having an enjoyable time. 

When twenty-five years old Mr. Bemis 
married Harriet B. Rice, who, like his mother, 
was born in Holden. Their only son, Arthur 
A., who became a skilful mechanic and en- 
gineer, died August 15, 1883, at the age of 
thirty-six years, leaving a widow, two sons, 
and a daughter. Politically, Mr. Bemis is a 
Republican. He belongs to the Order of 
American Mechanics. In religious belief 
both he and Mrs. Bemis are Congregation- 
alists and members of the Union Church. 



OHN APPLETON FAYER- 
W EAT HER, who has been prom- 
inently identified with the best inter- 
ests of Westboro since the early part of 
the present century, was born in this town, 
March 12, 1808. His parents, John and 



Sarah (Wheelock) Fayerweather, reared four 
children, of whom John A. was the eldest. 
The others were: Mrs. Sarah Chamberlain, 
who died April 6, 1897, eighty-nine years 
old; George J., who served in the late Civil 
War, was very active up to the time of his 
death, and died December 2, 1897, eighty 
years old; and Thomas H., who lived almost 
eighty years. George celebrated the seventy- 
fourth anniversary of his birth by walking 
from here to Worcester and back, a distance 
of twenty-five miles. 

John A. Fayerweather was graduated from 
Brown University in 1826 at the age of eigh- 
teen years, and has the distinction of being 
one of the two oldest living alumni of that in- 
stitution. He was taught the rudiments by a 
private tutor, and afterward attended a private 
school kept by the Rev. Mr. Allen. Subse- 
quently he fitted for college at Providence, 
R.I., where he was under the instruction of a 
Mr. Fay until he entered the university in 
1822. Returning to Westboro after receiving 
his diploma, Mr. Fayerweather assumed the 
management of the parental estate (which then 
included the homestead of F. U. Bartlett), 
his father having died while he was in col- 
lege. Later he and a partner opened a store 
opposite the Congregational church. As his 
partner was ill most of the time, he had to as- 
sume all the responsibility, although he had 
had no previous experience in that line. 
However, pluck and ability were not want- 
ing; and during the many years that he was 
afterward engaged as a merchant, he was espe- 
cially fortunate in his transactions. One of 
his first partners was James Leach, of Boston. 
Mr. Leach was succeeded by George Denny, 
the store being then located on the site of 
the present post-office building, in the centre 
of the village. Mr. Griggs, who afterward 
opened another store on the opposite side of 
the street, was for a time in business with 
Mr. Fayerweather. In 1858 Mr. Fayer- 
weather sold out his general store, which then 
included a tin and hardware department ; and 
in 1859 he went to Boston, and engaged in 
the wholesale grocery business, under the firm 
name of F. A. Fogg & Co. A few years 
later, in company with George O, Brigham 



3 2 4 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and A. J. Burnap, he erected the present post- 
office building, of which he is now the sole 
proprietor, having since purchased the inter- 
ests of the other two men. In the block, be- 
sides the post-office, are located the Westboro 
National and Savings Banks. He was the 
president of the Westboro National Bank 
from 1864 until illness compelled his resigna- 
tion in 1897. He is still a director of the 
institution and a trustee of the savings-bank, 
capacities in which he has served for many 
years. He was made a director of the 
Worcester Mutual Fire Insurance Company 
some years ago, and on May 1, 1887, he was 
chosen its president, a responsible office, to 
which he has been annually re-elected for ten 
successive years. 

Mr. Fayerweather has served many terms as 
the chairman of the Board of Selectmen. He 
was the president of the Worcester Agricult- 
ural Society for one year, but declined a re- 
election. In 1866 he represented his district 
in the General Court of Massachusetts. 
Since he united with the Congregational 
church in early manhood, he has been a faith- 
ful and valued member of the society. On 
December 27, 1831, he married Sarah A., 
daughter of Dr. John Tyler, of Worcester. 
They had two children, a son that died in in- 
fancy and a daughter. The latter, Sarah F., 
is the widow of the late William R. Gould, 
who at the time of his death, in 1890, was 
one of the largest manufacturers and most 
prominent business men of Westboro. She 
has one daughter, Gertrude Tyler Gould. 
Mrs. Fayerweather died April 15, 1875. 



"OHN M. CLARKE, a dealer in hay, 
grain, and flour at Webster, son of 
George W. and Mary A. (Hughes) 
Clarke, was born in Cambria County, 
Pennsylvania, March 24, 1841. His grand- 
parents were W. and Mary A. (Lyon) Clarke. 
The former was a Pennsylvanian by birth and 
a hotel-keeper and farmer by occupation. The 
father, also born in Pennsylvania, was for 
some time a foreman of a gang of workmen 
employed on the Northern Turnpike, between 
Pittsburg and Philadelphia, and later was en- 



gaged in the hotel business. He died in 
1886. His wife, Mary, also a native of Penn- 
sylvania, was a grand-daughter of a Revolu- 
tionary soldier; while her father, Edward 
Hughes, fought in both the War of 181 2 and 
the Mexican War. 

Having received his early education in the 
public schools of Indiana and Westmoreland 
Counties, Pennsylvania, John M. Clarke in 
i860 went to Illinois, where he found em- 
ployment on a farm, and worked for a time at 
carpentering. Subsequently, returning to the 
farm, he remained there until 1861. In this 
year he enlisted in Company D of the Twenty- 
third Regiment, Illinois Volunteers, under 
Captain S. A. Simison and Colonel James A. 
Mulligan. From the Chicago drilling camp 
he went to St. Louis and thence to Jefferson 
City, where he remained in Colonel John C. 
Fremont's command until the battle of Lex- 
ington, Mo. At that time the entire regiment 
was captured. Having been paroled on the 
field of battle, Mr. Clarke was allowed to re- 
turn to St. Louis; and shortly afterward he 
was discharged. After spending some time at 
his home in Illinois he returned to Pennsyl- 
vania, and for six months worked in West- 
moreland County. Following this he was 
employed for another six months in a dry- 
goods store of Pittsburg. At the end of that 
time he went to Ottawa, 111., and had charge 
of a clothing store there for three months. He 
then went to Odell, Livingston County, 111., 
and for one year was employed in conducting 
a general merchandise store in that town. At 
the end of the year he bought the store, and 
thereafter carried it on for eighteen months on 
his own account. Then he sold out and trav- 
elled as a book agent in the interests of Ab- 
bott's History of the War. He subsequently 
bought a drug and grocery store in Odell, and 
conducted it for some time. In the spring of 
1873, having disposed of this store, he went 
out to Nebraska and started a cattle ranch. 
Having spent a year there, he came to Webs- 
ter, and entered the employ of the Webster 
Box Company as general manager. Upon the 
failure of the controlling company he bought 
the stock and fixtures, and continued the busi- 
ness under his own name. After the factory 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



325 



was destroyed by fire in the spring of 1875 he 
rebuilt it, and conducted it for some time 
longer. Then he sold out, removed to Bos- 
ton, and there for three years ran a grocery 
store in Eliot Square. In 1880 he again re- 
turned to Webster, and at that time staited 
the business in which he is at present engaged. 
In 1866 Mr. Clarke was married to Lucy 
D. Williams, a daughter of John E. and 
Hulda (Shumway) Williams, of Odell, 111., 
formerly of Thompson, Conn. Three children 
have blessed the marriage, namely: Bessie M., 
born in 1867; Reginald W. , bom in 1869; 
and Lewis G., born in 1871. Bessie, who was 
educated at Odell, 111., and in Webster, is 
now living with her parents. Reginald re- 
ceived his education in Webster and Boston, 
and is now in Worcester with the well-known 
firm of Burnes & Co. Lewis G., who attended 
school in Webster and Boston, is in the em- 
ploy of Mr. Burgman, who has a bicycle busi- 
ness in Webster. In politics Mr. Clarke is a 
Democrat. He is a member of Nathan Lyon 
Post, No. 61, G. A. R., and of Ben Franklin 
Council, R. A. Y., at Webster. Of the post 
he has been Commander, and he is now Senior 
Vice-Commander. He attends the Congrega- 
tional church. 



DWIN MOORE, a retired business man 
of East Douglas and an ex-member of 
the Massachusetts legislature, was 
born in Douglas, October 19, 1820, son of 
Israel and Submit (Balcome) Moore. The pa- 
ternal grandfather, Jonas Moore, who was born 
in Sudbury, Mass., July 6, 1765, spent the 
active period of his life in farming. The 
maiden name of his wife was Alice Wheelock. 
Israel Moore, born in Sudbury, August 1, 
1793, learned the blacksmith's trade in Marl- 
boro, Vt. When eighteen years old he re- 
turned on foot to Massachusetts, settling in 
Douglas, where be resided for some years. 
In 1822 he moved to Oxford, Mass., where he 
bought a homestead, and followed his trade 
until his death, which occurred September 27, 
1829. He was a sturdy, industrious man and 
a useful citizen. His wife, who was born in 
Douglas, November 19, 1795, gave birth to 



three children : Catherine, who died in in- 
fancy ; Edwin, the subject of this sketch; and 
Julia, born January 22, 1823, who died May 
17, 1855. The mother died February 28, 
1847. Both parents were members of the 
Congregational church. 

Edwin Moore began his education in the 
elementary public schools, and completed his 
studies at the Oxford High School. At the 
age of twelve years he went to work upon the 
farm of the Rev. David Holman. Later he 
was employed as a store clerk and worked in 
the axe factory. From 1848 to 1850 he car- 
ried on business for himself. Then he re- 
entered the employ of Warren Hunt as book- 
keeper and paymaster at the axe factory. In 
1865 he was appointed agent for that estab- 
lishment, a position which he filled with 
marked ability until 1880, when he retired 
from active business. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. He has rendered excellent service 
to the town in the several capacities of Select- 
man, Assessor, Overseer of the Poor, and a 
member of the School Committee, in that of 
Town Clerk for nine years, in that of Town 
Treasurer for three years, and in that of Rep- 
resentative to the legislature in 1856 and 
1882. He is a member of the Congregational 
church. 

On September 30, 1841, at Belfast, Me., 
Mr. Moore was joined in marriage with Eliza 
P. Palmer, who was born in Lincolnville, Me., 
August 19, 1822, daughter of Joseph and 
Sarah Palmer. Mrs. Moore has had five chil- 
dren, namely: Dwight P., born July 10, 1842, 
who died September 24, 1846; William H., 
born October 4, 1846, who is married and has 
one daughter, Helen P., born August 18, 
1872; Julia S., born November 25, 1848, who 
is now Mrs. W. H. Kendall; Edwin W., born 
May 22, 185 1, who died October 21, 1859; 
and Thomas W. , born May 30, 1853, who died 
August 21, 1854. 




RANK S. GROVER, proprietor of the 
Eagle House in Dana and a prominent 
official of the town, was born here on 
January 7, 1855, son of John N. and Elmina 
(Durkee) Grover. His grandfather, Elijah 



326 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Grover, the greater part of whose life was 
spent in the town of Montague, the last few 
years being passed in Dana, was by occupation 
a farmer. He lived to be an old man. 

John N. Grover, above named, was born in 
Wendell or Montague. In early life he was a 
boatman on the Connecticut River; but about 
1840 he settled in Dana, and during the re- 
mainder of his life was engaged in farming 
and teaming here. He did a very large busi- 
ness in teaming, transporting merchandise be- 
tween this part of the State and Boston, rail- 
roads then not being as numerous as they now 
are. He became widely known and had a host 
of friends. In politics he was a stanch Dem- 
ocrat. He died in 1884, at the age of seventy 
years. His .wife, who was born in Montague, 
died in 1888, at the age of seventy. Of their 
seven children, Emma and Lewis H. are de- 
ceased. Those living are: Henry C, who is 
a lumberman in Petersham; Julia Nye, a resi- 
dent of Dana; Lucy D. Hawes, of Barre ; 
John C, of Greenwich, a hotel man; and 
Frank S. 

Frank S. Grover grew to manhood in Dana, 
and was educated here. He now owns the 
farm of one hundred and seventy-five acres 
which was formerly his father's, and other 
lands in addition, making a total of about 
three hundred and fifty acres. He is quite 
extensively engaged in the lumber manufact- 
ure, making both long and short lumber; and 
since 1893 he has been proprietor of the Eagle 
House. As a hotel man he has met with un- 
usual success, this being due to the excellent 
accommodations he furnishes his guests and to 
his obliging manners. The Eagle House is 
not a large hotel, but the twenty or more 
guests that may be accommodated here have 
never cause to complain on that account. 

Mr. Grover was married in 1877 to Eva 
Balcom, a native of Hades, Warren County, 
N. Y. Seven children have been born of this 
union, namely: Owen, who died at the age of 
two years; Oakley, who lived only a few days; 
Emma C. ; Lucy E. ; Clayton L. ; Ruth A. ; 
and Glenn E. 

Mr. Grover's religious views are liberal. In 
politics he is a Democrat. Besides attending 
carefully to his private business interests, he 



has given a large amount of time to the public 
service. For the last fourteen years he has 
been a member of the Board of Selectmen of 
the town and for the greater part of that time 
chairman of the board. He is at the present 
time serving as Assessor, Road Commissioner, 
and Overseer of the Poor. He is also on his 
third consecutive year as a member of the 
School Board. He is one of the most ener- 
getic and progressive men in town, and in the 
discharge of public duties is as faithful as he 
is active. 



DWARD L. HILL, attorney - at - law, 
Baldwinsvil-le, and a Civil War vet- 
eran, was born in Portsmouth, N.H., 
October 15, 1832, son of William and Eliz- 
abeth S. (Wiggin) Hill. The paternal grand- 
father, Samuel Hill, who was born in Ber- 
wick, Me., February 12, 1745, became one of 
the early merchants and ship-owners of Ports- 
mouth. After acquiring considerable wealth 
he lost a part of it during the French War. 
He died in Portsmouth, March 19, 1812. 
The maiden name of his wife was Mary S. 
Gooch. William Hill, son of Samuel, was 
born in Portsmouth, February 11, 1783. En- 
tering trade when a young man, he continued 
in business for some years; and he died Feb- 
ruary 22, 1849, aged sixty-six. By his first 
wife, whose maiden name was Mary Duncan, 
there were six children. His second wife, 
Elizabeth S. Hill, who was born January 17, 
1804, had five children. Of these, three are 
living, namely: Edward L., the subject of 
this sketch ; and Frederick A. and Herman 
H., who are merchants in Chicago. The 
mother died May 22, 1876. 

Edward L. Hill acquired his early educa- 
tion in the public schools, at Phillips Acad- 
emy in Exeter, N. H., and at the Massachu- 
setts State Normal School in Bridgewater. 
His legal studies were pursued with John 
Lowell and Thornton Lothrop, of Boston. 
After his admission to the Suffolk County bar 
in i860, he located in Waltham, Mass. Al- 
though possessing a lucrative practice at the 
breaking out of the Rebellion, the urgent call 
for troops caused him to close his office and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3n 



raise a company for the Fifth Regiment. 
Then he enlisted as a private in Company A, 
Forty-fourth Regiment, Massachusetts Volun- 
teers, which was mustered into service August 
29, 1862. While fulfilling his nine months' 
service he acted as correspondent of the 
VValtham Sentinel. After his discharge he re- 
sumed his law practice. In 1870 he moved 
from VValtham to Danvers, Mass., and for the 
succeeding twenty years practised his profes- 
sion in Salem and Boston. In April, 1890, 
he established himself in Baklwinsville, where 
he has built up a profitable general law busi- 
ness. Much interested in horticulture, he de- 
votes a considerable portion of his leisure time 
to the care of his greenhouse. 

On June 8, 1869, Mr. Hill was united in 
marriage at Jamaica Plain, Mass., with Ger- 
trude Manning, a native of VValtham and a 
daughter of Francis and Sarah M. (Blanchard) 
Manning. Born of this union there is one 
daughter, Catharine B. Hill, who is now at 
the training school for nurses in Waltham. 
In politics Mr. Hill is a Republican. He is 
a charter member of the Northern Mutual Re- 
lief Association ; belongs to the Royal Ar- 
canum ; is a comrade of Farragut Post, 
G. A. R., of Gardner, Mass. ; and is a Past 
Commander of Post No. 90, G. A. R., of 
Danvers. Both he and Mrs. Hill attend the 
Congregational church. 




^ALVIN MAYNARD, a prosperous 
farmer and dairyman of Lancaster, 
was born in Boylston, Mass., No- 
vember 20, 1846, son of James F. 
and Dolly (Brigham) Maynard. His grand- 
father, Calvin Maynard, a native of Worcester 
County, after residing for many years in Marl- 
boro, spent his last days in Boylston. 

James F. Maynard was a native of Marlboro. 
When a young man he engaged in a mercantile 
business in Boylston. Later he had a busi- 
ness in Clinton and still later a wholesale trade 
in State Street, Boston, as a member of the 
firm of Daniel Allen & Co. His connection 
with the latter concern lasted seventeen years, 
during which time he resided in Clinton, 
where he died at the age of sixty-four years. 



He was the chairman of the Board of Select- 
men for many years, and was a recruiting 
officer in Clinton during the Civil War. In 
politics he acted with the Republican party. 
His religious belief was the Methodist faith, 
and for a number of years he was officially 
connected with the church and Sunday-school. 
He was also a member of Trinity Lodge, F. & 
A. M. His wife, born in Boylston, a daugh- 
ter of Samuel Brigham, was a grand-daughter 
of Samuel Brigham, M. D., who was private 
secretary to General Washington, and later 
practised his profession in Boylston. Her 
father was engaged in agriculture during his 
active years, and died at the age of eighty-five. 
Of his several children, Dolly was the only 
daughter. James E. and Dolly Maynard were 
the parents of two children: Ellen A., who 
married William H. Hartshorn ; and Calvin, 
the subject of this sketch. The mother died 
at the age of sixty. 

Calvin Maynard accompanied his parents to 
Clinton when he was four years old, and he 
acquired his education in the elementary 
schools and high school of that town. He 
began at an early age to assist his father in the 
store. Having succeeded to the business, 
when the latter transferred his interests to 
Boston, he carried it on for some years. 
After selling the Clinton store he engaged in 
the shoe furnishing business in Worcester, 
later conducting a similar establishment in 
Marlboro. Retiring from mercantile pursuits 
in 1883, he purchased a farm of one hundred 
and forty acres in Lancaster, where he has since 
resided. Fie has enhanced the value of his 
property by remodelling the residence and 
other buildings and by improving the fertility 
of the land. He carries on general farming 
and dairying, keeps twenty excellent cows, 
and supplies a profitable milk route in Clin- 
ton. 

In 1878 Mr. Maynard married Mary B. 
Stickney, of Williamstown, Vt. Her father, 
Horace Stickney, who was an industrious 
farmer, died from the effects of injuries to his 
health received while serving in the Civil 
War. Mrs. Maynard is the mother of six- 
children; namely, Nellie F., Charles, Nahum, 
Forest, James, and Stanley. In politics Mr. 



328 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Maynard is a Republican, and he has been a 
member of the Board of Assessors in Lancaster 
for three years. For two years he served as 
Master of Lancaster Grange, Patrons of Hus- 
bandry. He is a member of the Congrega- 
tional church and of the Parish Committee, 
while the members of his family are connected 
with the church and Sunday-school. 




ILAS A. FORBUSH, the well- 
known shoe manufacturer of Graf- 
ton, was born in this town in 1823, 
son of Silas and Clarissa (Eames) 
Forbush. He is descended from the old Colo- 
nial family founded by Daniel Forbush, who, 
with his wife Deborah, established his home 
in Marlboro, Mass., about 1681. 

Daniel Forbush (or Ffarrabas, as formerly 
spelled) married in Cambridge in 1660 Re- 
becca Perriman, and a year or two after her 
death, which occurred in 1677, married Deb- 
orah Rediat. Thomas Forbush, son of 
Daniel, born in 1667, married Dorcas Rice; 
Thomas, Jr., son of Thomas, married Hannah 
Bellows; and their son David, born in 1 72 1, 
married Annah Whitney, sister of Eli Whit- 
ney, inventor of the cotton-gin; Silas, Sr., 
son of David, born in 1766, married Rhoda 
Fisk. 

Silas Forbush, son of Silas and Rhoda, and 
father of the subject of this sketch, was born 
in Grafton in 1795, and here spent his long 
life of ninety-two years. He was one of the 
most industrious and Indefatigable of men. 
He early began the manufacture of shoes on 
his own account, and he followed it very suc- 
cessfully for some time. Subsequently he 
devoted himself to agricultural pursuits. As 
he was a man of excellent judgment and of un- 
biassed mind, his advice was much sought for. 
Hence he came to be an influential man in 
the town, and was respected by all who knew 
him. His son, Jonathan Chester Forbush, 
now a prominent manufacturer in New York 
State, was born here, July 14, 1825, and spent 
his boyhood on his father's farm. After work- 
ing for some time in his father's shoe shop, 
being still quite a young man, he began inde- 
pendently to manufacture shoes in company 



with Nathaniel Brown. After manufacturing 
for about a year in Grafton, he removed his 
plant to Buffalo, N. Y. , where the business 
has greatly increased. 

Like his father and brother, Silas A. For- 
bush early turned his attention to shoemaking. 
After leaving school he began serving an ap- 
prenticeship, this being before the days of ma- 
chinery, and when the only tools used were 
the knife, hammer, and needle. After he had 
thoroughly learned the business, he started for 
himself as a manufacturer, employing at first 
only a few workmen. Such was the quality of 
his goods that he found a ready market for 
them, and the business has increased to such 
an extent that the factory has now the largest 
manufacturing plant in the village, and em- 
ploys from seventy-five to a hundred men. 
The output consists of men's shoes of a high 
grade. Mr. Forbush still keeps the active 
management of the business in his own hands, 
and directs the movements of his agents in 
Boston and New York. 

Mr. Forbush takes an active part in public 
affairs, and has served the town as Selectman. 
In 1892 he was a Representative to the Gen- 
eral Court. While in the legislature he was 
on the Committee on Education. Formerly a 
Free Soiler, he is now an ardent Republican. 
His first Presidential vote was cast for James 
K. Polk. He is a valued member of the Uni- 
tarian society and one of its trustees and as- 
sessors. Fraternally, he is associated with 
Franklin Lodge, F. & A. M., and with Tyrian 
Chapter, R. A. M. He married Julia Bill- 
iard, of Upton, whose death occurred six years 
ago. She was the mother of Silas A. For- 
bush, Jr., and of Ida Virginia Forbush. The 
former is the agent of the White Breast Fuel 
Company, in Ottumwa, la. ; and the latter is 
the wife of F. M. McGarry, of Grafton. 



Yrs)UKE S. MOORE, the proprietor of 
I Sunnyside Farm, Hubbardston, son of 

JL J' _ , Uriah B. and Amanda (Partridge) 
Moore, was born in Templeton, 
Mass., August 18, 1832. He traces his de- 
scent to an Irishman who came to the country 
early in the last century, and has reason to be- 




SILAS A. FORBUSH. 






BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



33i 



lieve that some of his ancestors were Revolu- 
tionary soldiers. 

Uriah Moore, the grandfather of Luke S. 
Moore, born in Gardner, Mass., December 31, 
1769, followed agriculture during his active 
years, and died in that town on January 6, 
1810. He married Esther Merritt, who, born 
March 17, 1769, died July 27, 1847. Their 
children, all now deceased, were born as fol- 
lows : Lucy, April 21, 1792; Henry, January 
26, 1794; Francis M., April 24, 1796; Lucy, 
second, March 13, 1799; Noah M., December 
24, 1 801; Uriah B., September 1, 1805; and 
Priscilla E., April 24, 1808. Uriah B. 
Moore, who was a native of Boylston, Mass., 
spent the greater part of his life upon a farm 
in Templeton. His last days were passed 
with his son in Hubbardston, and he died Sep- 
tember 22, 1884. In his later years he sup- 
ported the Republican party. He was an ac- 
tive member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Amanda, his wife, who was born in 
Templeton, June 13, 181 1, bore him eight 
children, of whom Luke S. is the only sur- 
vivor. The others were: Jane A., Otis P., 
Henry M., Francis L., Lucy M., Lewis S., 
and Mary A. Their mother died in Temple- 
ton, August 26, 1 88 1. 

Luke S. Moore was educated in the common 
schools of his native town. When eighteen 
years old he began to learn chair-making, 
which he subsequently followed as a journey- 
man for ten years. Since 1861 he has been 
occupied in dairy farming and fruit-growing 
in Hubbardston. His property, which is 
known as Sunnyside Farm, containing fifty- 
five acres of fertile land, is desirably located 
upon high ground, commanding a splendid 
view of the surrounding country. Keeping 
an average of eight cows, he annually makes 
about eighteen hundred pounds of superior 
butter, which is sold to regular customers. 
From his apples, which he raises in consider- 
able quantities, he obtains evaporated apple, 
cider, and vinegar. On May 21, 1856, Mr. 
Moore married Cynthia Follett, who was born 
at Sunnyside Farm, September 28, 1830, 
daughter of Jonathan M. and Mary (Wheat) 
Follett. Mrs. Moore died May 8, 1897, leav- 
ing no children. Politically, Mr. Moore is a 



Republican; and he has served with ability 
as Assessor, Overseer of the Poor, and Tax- 
Collector. He is a member of Hubbardston 
Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. In religious 
belief he is a Congregationalist. Mr. Moore 
is one of the most energetic men in the town. 




HARLES T. FLETCHER, a well- 
known landscape gardener of Lancas- 
ter and an ex-member of the legis- 
lature, was born in this town, March 
23, 1826. A son of Joshua and Nabby (War- 
ren) Fletcher, he belongs to a family that has 
been identified with Lancaster since 171 2. 
In that year John Fletcher, his great-great- 
grandfather, who afterward became an exten- 
sive land-owner and farmer, came here from 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

Timothy Fletcher, the grandfather, who was 
born in Lancaster, learned the trade of a shoe- 
maker, and followed it in connection with 
farming in different localities, principally in 
Grafton, Mass. His last days were spent 
upon a farm in his native town. During the 
Revolutionary War he made shoes for the pa- 
triots. It is related that on one occasion he 
led a team load of footwear from Grafton to 
Washington's army at Valley Forge. Joshua 
Fletcher, born in Alstead, N. H., spent the 
greater part of his life in Lancaster, where he 
worked at shoemaking until his death, which 
occurred when he was sixty-one years old. 
Nabby, his wife, who was a daughter of Moses 
Warren, of Watertown, died at the age of 
sixty-five. Of her six children, the survivors 
are: Eleanor L. and Mrs. Andrew J. Brown, 
who live in Milford, Mass. ; Julia, who married 
Thomas J. Carney, and resides in Galesburg, 
111. ; and Charles T., the subject of this 
sketch. Both parents were members of the 
Universalist church. 

Charles T. Fletcher acquired his education 
in an academy of his native town. Afterward 
he learned the shoemaker's trade, and followed 
it for some time. He was also employed for 
some time in the construction of the New- 
York & Lake Erie Railway. Upon his return 
to Lancaster in 1856 he took the position of 
landscape gardener with Nathaniel Thayer. 



332 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He has since retained his connection with the 
family, serving both the grandfather and the 
father of the present generation, and has 
graded and decorated the grounds of each new 
residence built by the descendants of his orig- 
inal employer. At the present time he has 
charge of the old family homestead. 

Mr. Fletcher contracted the first of his two 
marriages in 1856, with Mrs. Cornelia Jack- 
man, a daughter of L. D. Maynard, and who 
died at the age of forty-five years. His sec- 
ond marriage united him with Isabella Frances 
Maynard, his first wife's sister, who died in 
1894. He has an adopted daughter, Gertrude 
M. Fletcher. Various important town offices 
have been filled by him, including those of 
Assessor and Auditor. He was a member of 
the Library Board of Trustees in 1879, and 
he ably represented this district in the leg- 
islature in 1891. Politically, he acts with 
the Republican party. He erected his present 
residence in 1869, upon land purchased by 
his father. The family attend the Unita- 
rian church. 




ILLIAM ROGERS, the founder of 
the Clinton Worsted Company, was 
born in Scotland, February 23, 
1856, son of John and Clementine (Woods) 
Rogers. Both his father and paternal grand- 
father were born and reared in the vicinity 
of Paisley, Scotland. The latter, William 
Rogers, who was engaged in the manufacture 
of Paisley shawls during his active period, 
lived to be ninety-three years old. John 
Rogers learned the weaver's trade, which he 
followed in Scotland until 1866. Then he 
emigrated to the United States, locating in 
Schaghticoke, N. Y. , where he was overseer in 
a woollen-mill for some years. Later in Au- 
burn, N.Y., he was similarly employed for a 
time. Then, after spending a season in his 
former position at Schaghticoke, he was con- 
nected with mills in Glendale, Mass., Glen- 
ville, Conn., Winooski, Vt., and Leominster, 
Mass. He came to Clinton in 1891, and is 
now living here in retirement. Clementine, 
his wife, who is a native of Paisley, Scotland, 
has been the mother of nine children. Of 



these, seven grew to maturity; namely, Agnes, 
William, Clementine, Janet, John, George, 
and Alexander. Both parents attend the Con- 
gregational church. 

William Rogers attended schools in Scot- 
land and the United States. He first worked 
for wages in a cotton-mill. Joining his father 
at Schaghticoke in 1867, he entered the 
woollen factory and learned the business. 
While still a youth he was advanced to the po- 
sition of loom repairer. Later he^ became a 
designer at the Hawthorn Mills in Glenville, 
Conn. When twenty-one years old he was ap- 
pointed to a similar position in the Burlington 
Woollen Mills at Winooski, Vt. Here he re- 
mained for seven years in all, acting as super- 
intendent during the last three years. Then 
he resigned his position in order to accept the 
superintendency of the Rockwell Woollen 
Mills at Leominster, Mass., with which he 
was connected for one year. Later, having al- 
ready started in business upon his own account 
with a force of ten hands, he and William H. 
Chase formed the Leominster Worsted Com- 
pany and erected a new mill. After a time 
the increasing demand for their goods necessi- 
tated the enlargement of their force to one 
hundred operatives. In 1890 the company 
was incorporated, with Mr. Rogers as presi- 
dent. Mr. Rogers withdrew from the enter- 
prise about six months later; and early in 1891 
he and his brother, John Rogers, established 
the Clinton Worsted Company. This firm, 
which began work with forty hands, now em- 
ploys two hundred operatives, occupies two 
large buildings, and daily produces thirteen 
hundred yards of worsted of different weights. 
The worsteds, which are sold throughout the 
United States, were awarded a medal and di- 
ploma at the Columbian Exposition in 1893. 
Notwithstanding the present business depres- 
sion, the factory has continued in active opera- 
tion ; and the returning prosperity, which is 
already making itself felt in every branch of 
business, will no doubt cause a heavier de- 
mand upon its capacity. 

In 1877 Mr. Rogers married Mary Connell, 
a native of Ennis, Ireland. Mrs. Rogers is 
the mother of four children — John Gray, Nora 
Clementine, William Rogers, Jr., and Arthur 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



333 



H. Rogers. Mr. Rogers is connected with 
Trinity Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Clinton Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; with the Commandery 
and Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of 
the Prescott Club. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. 




HOSMER, the treasurer of the 
Templeton Savings Bank in Baldwins- 
ville, was born in Templeton, Feb- 
ruary 2, 1842. A son of Asa and 
Lucy P. (Bryant) Hosmer, he comes of one of 
the oldest families in the town. His great- 
grandfather, Josiah Hosmer, came to this vi- 
cinity from Concord, Mass., and settled upon 
a farm. The grandfather, Asa Hosmer, first, 
was a prosperous farmer and a lifelong resident 
of this town. Asa Hosmer, second, the 
father, who was born in Templeton, March 
2 9> 1 795, tilled the .soil energetically from 
early manhood until his death, which occurred 
in 1869. He won the good will of his fellow- 
townsmen by his many commendable qualities. 
Politically, he supported the Democratic party. 
Lucy P. Hosmer, his wife, who was born in 
Templeton, May 11, 1818, had seven chil- 
dren, three of whom are living. These are: 
Asa, the subject of this sketch; Oscar, a resi- 
dent of Wenham, Mass., and the financial edi- 
tor of the Boston Herald; and Frank L. 
Hosmer, a well-known hot-house gardener of 
this town. The others were : Geraldine, Na- 
than, Flora, and James, who died young. The 
mother is also deceased. After receiving his 
education in the public schools and at the 
academy in New Ipswich, N.H., the subject 
of this biography obtained employment in the 
chair factory of Sawyer, Thompson & Perley, 
with whom he remained eight years, having 
charge of the cane department for the greater 
part of the time. For the succeeding ten 
years he was a member of the firm of E. Saw- 
yer & Co., furniture manufacturers of Bald- 
winsville. Chosen treasurer of the Temple- 
ton Savings Bank in 1880, he has ably filled 
that position up to the present time. Another 
of his occupations is that of local representa- 
tive of twelve reliable insurance companies, 
and in the capacity of Justice of the Peace he 



has been employed to settle many estates. On 
January 6, 1868, he contracted his first mar- 
riage with Maria L. Moore, who died in 1888. 
His second and present wife, whom he wedded 
August 6, 1889, was formerly Isabella San- 
ders, of Templeton. She has given birth to 
two children — Asa Hosmer, Jr., and Kath- 
leen S. Hosmer. 

Mr. Hosmer is a member of the Congrega- 
tional church. In politics he is a Republi- 
can, and he has served upon the School Com- 
mittee for the past sixteen years. He is a 
member of Narragansett Lodge, No. 222, 
I. O. O. F. ; of Star Lodge, No. 20, Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, of Baldwinsville; 
of Tribe No. 48, Improved Order of Red Men ; 
and of Crystal Lodge, No. 1072, Knights and 
Ladies of Honor, of Gardner, Mass. As a 
business man he is reliable, alert, and progres- 
sive; and the present prosperous condition of 
the savings-bank speaks well for his ability as 
a financier. 




LSON J. GREENWOOD, one of the 
most prosperous farmers and promi- 
nent residents of Hubbardston, was 
born here, September 27, 1829, son 
of Silas and Julia (Daniels) Greenwood. The 
paternal grandfather was Abijah Greenwood, 
who came from Llolden to Hubbardston about 
the year 1770. Settling in the eastern part of 
the town, upon the farm where his grandson 
was born, he resided here until his death, 
which occurred January 9, 18 14, at the age of 
sixty-five years. He was Town Treasurer 
from 1800 to 1803 and again in 1809; and he 
was a Selectman in 1780, 1783, 1787, 1792, 
and 1794. In politics he acted with the 
Whig party. He attended the Unitarian 
church. The maiden name of his first wife, 
whom he married July 14, 1774, and who died 
July 16, 1782, was Rhoda Pond. On Octo- 
ber 3, 1783, he married Elizabeth Marean, 
who died February 15, iS 14. 

Silas Greenwood, who was born in Hub- 
bardston, November 19, 1786, learned the 
millwright's trade, and followed it for some 
time. Eventually he returned to the home- 
stead for the purpose of caring for his parents 



334 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



during their declining years. In 1837 he 
moved from there to the farm now owned by 
his son. He held various town offices, includ- 
ing that of Selectman, which he occupied for 
upward of thirteen years ; and he was a member 
of the State legislature in 1835. In politics 
he voted with the Whig party. He was a 
member of the Unitarian church. His death 
occurred March 12, 1857. Julia Greenwood, 
his wife, who was a native of Hopkinton, 
Mass., gave birth to nine children, namely: 
Joseph E., on March 14, 1813, who died Au- 
gust 31, 1872; Abijah H., December 28, 
1814, who died January 3, 1864; Silas M., 
October 21, 1817, who resides in Hubbards- 
ton ; Harriett, August 12, 1819, who died Au- 
gust 18 of the same year; Julia, October 27, 
1820, who lives in Hubbardston; Abigail D., 
June 12, 1823, who also resides in Hubbards- 
ton ; Harriett, second, April 15, 1825, who is 
no longer living; Hannah, August 24, 1827, 
who is a resident of this town; and Alson J., 
the subject of this sketch. The mother died 
January 9, 1864, aged seventy-one years. 

Alson J. Greenwood was educated in the 
town schools. He assisted in carrying on the 
farm until nearly twenty-one years old, and 
what money he earned by doing outside work 
he gave to his father. Subsequently he 
learned the shoemaker's trade, and followed it 
for about five years. At the end of that period 
he returned to the homestead, and after his 
father's death succeeded to the property by 
purchasing the interest of the other heirs. 
The farm proper contains one hundred and eight 
acres of well-improved land. Conjointly with 
his son, he owns some outlying property amount- 
ing to about two hundred acres, and is inter- 
ested in the lumber business. In 1853 Mr. 
Greenwood was joined in marriage with 
Martha G. Moulton, who was born in Hub- 
bardston, July 9, 1833, daughter of Sewell and 
Polly Moulton. Mrs. Greenwood is the 
mother of five children, namely: S. Elliott, 
M.D., who was born September 15, 1853; 
Silas A., born December 6, 1854; Arthur D., 
born May 23, 1858; Grace, born February 3, 
1862; and Harrison, born August 31, 1863. 
Arthur D. Greenwood is associated with his 
father in farming, stock-raising, and lumber- 



ing. In politics Mr. Greenwood is a Demo- 
crat. He was elected Assessor in 1875 ar >d 
1878, and he has been a member of the board 
continuously since 1881. For the greater part 
of the time from 1872 to 1896 he was a Select- 
man, being the chairman of that body for three 
years. He also served as Tax Collector and 
Overseer of the Poor. In Hubbardston 
Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, he has occu- 
pied the Master's and Overseer's chairs, and 
he takes an active interest in the general wel- 
fare of the community. He attends the Uni- 
tarian church, and is a member of the society. 



AMES PERKINS PAINE, of Worces- 
ter, Mass., was born December 16, 
1827, on the estate where he now re- 
sides. He is a son of the late Fred- 
erick William Paine, a gentleman of means 
and a useful and highly esteemed citizen, for 
many years prominent in town affairs; and he 
is a descendant in the eighth generation of 
Stephen Paine, Sr. , who crossed the Atlantic 
in the ship "Diligence" in 1638, bringing 
with him his wife, Rose, their three sons, 
and four servants. 

Stephen Paine, Sr. , came from Great 
Ellingham, near Hingbam, Norfolk County, 
England. He settled at Hingham, in the 
Province of Massachusetts Bay, where he had a 
land grant, and in 1639 was made a freeman. 
In 1641 he was a Deputy to the General Court. 
In 1643, in company with four of his neigh- 
bors, he removed to Seekonk, Bristol County, 
Mass., and, taking up a large tract of land, 
became one of the leading settlers there, as is 
proved by the early town records, in which his 
name appears frequently, and in which it is 
shown that his estate was in that year valued 
at five hundred and thirty-five pounds sterling. 
In 1645 he was elected a Deputy to the Plym- 
outh Court, a position which he held sixteen 
consecutive years. He survived King Philip's 
War, and died in January, 1677, soon after the 
death of two of his sons. 

Another son, Stephen Paine, Jr., born in 
1629, was but nine years old when he arrived 
in New England with his parents. He ac- 
tively participated in King Philip's War, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



335 



contributed liberally toward the local expenses 
incurred at that time. He was an early set- 
tler of Rehoboth, Mass., where he died in 
1710, leaving a widow and five sons. Na- 
thaniel Paine, Sr., one of the five, was born in 
Rehoboth, October 18, 1661. In his early 
manhood he became one of the pioneer propri- 
etors of Bristol, R.I., where he afterward 
served as Selectman, and in 17 10 was ap- 
pointed one of the Judges of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas for Rhode Island. He was also 
Probate Judge for Bristol County five years, 
and was one of the Council of Massachusetts 
Bay from 1703 until his death in 1723. He 
married Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. Eben- 
ezer Williams, and by this union had one 
child, Nathaniel, Jr., who was born in Bristol, 
R.I., March 9, 1688. Nathaniel Paine, Jr., 
married Dorothy, daughter of Jonathan Rains- 
ford, of Boston. 

Timothy Paine, born in Bristol, R.I. , July 
30, 1730, son of Nathaniel, Jr., and Dorothy 
Paine, was the fifth in this line of descent 
from the original American ancestor, and was 
the founder of the Worcester branch of the 
Paine family. He came here from Bristol 
with his mother and her second husband, the 
Hon. John Chandler, in 1740. In 1748 he was 
graduated from Harvard College as the fifth in 
his class, which at that time was graded ac- 
cording to the dignity of the families repre- 
sented. In 1749 he married Sarah, daughter 
of the Hon. John Chandler. In 175 1 he was 
appointed Clerk of the Court of Probate, from 
1754 til] 1764 he was Town Clerk, from 1765 
until 1768 he was one of His Majesty's Coun- 
cil, from 1761 until 1775 he served as Register 
of Deeds, and from 1785 until 1788 he was a 
Representative to the General Court. He was 
an extensive landholder, owning more than 
three hundred acres of land on Lincoln Street, 
where, just before the breaking out of the 
Revolutionary War, he began the erection of a 
house, which was not completed until after the 
close of the struggle for independence. The 
Paine family were Tories, or loyalists, their 
sympathies being with the Crown ; and in 1774 
he was appointed under the new Acts of Parlia- 
ment one of His Majesty's Mandamus Coun- 
cillors, This was specially obnoxious to the 



large majority of Worcester patriots; and, 
though he personally was held in high esteem, 
the feeling against the Tories was so bitter 
that he resigned the office after receiving a 
visit on August 23, 1774, from fifteen hun- 
dred or more of his fellow-townsmen. He and 
his wife subsequently gave a large dinner party 
to the court and the bar, and among the guests 
of prominence invited by Judge and Mrs. 
Paine was John Adams. 

William Paine, M.D., the sixth in the an- 
cestral line, son of Timothy and Sarah (Chand- 
ler) Paine, was born on the old homestead in 
Worcester, June 5, 1750, and was graduated 
from Harvard College in 1768, standing the 
second in his class. He subsequently studied 
medicine with Dr. Edward Holyoke, of Salem, 
Mass., and in 1771 began the practice of his 
profession in Worcester, where in 1772 he 
opened the first apothecary store established in 
Worcester County, becoming head of the firm 
of Paine & Co. A loyalist, he went to Eng- 
land soon after the resolutions adopted in Au- 
gust, 1774, and remained abroad until the fol- 
lowing spring. Returning home soon after 
the battle of Lexington, he found that he had 
been denounced as a Tory. He again sailed 
for Liverpool, where he studied and practised 
in the hospitals until appointed to the office of 
apothecary to the English forces in America. 
He received the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
from Marischal College, Aberdeen, Scotland. 
In the summer of 1784 he took possession of 
an estate on Passamaquoddy Bay presented to 
him by the English government for his ser- 
vices; but, finding he could not there educate 
his children as he wished, he removed in 17S5 
to St. John, N. B. , where he was afterward 
elected to the Assembly and made clerk of the 
House. In 1787 he removed to Salem, Mass., 
and on the death of his father he returned to 
Worcester. Here he occupied the parental 
estate, which on account of the forests near 
was called the Oaks, until his death, April 19, 
1833. Dr. Paine and his wife, Lois Orne, 
the daughter of a Salem merchant who was en- 
gaged in the East India trade, reared six chil- 
dren. 

Frederick William Paine, their youngest 
child, was bom in Salem, Mass., Mny 23, 



33& 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



17S8, and in 1793 came with his parents to 
Worcester. Ten years later, in 1803, he en- 
tered Harvard, but at the end of nine months 
he left the college to engage in a mercantile 
career. Engaging in commerce with foreign 
countries, he made voyages around the world, 
embarking in 1806 and again in 1809, visiting 
China and other important ports. From 1818 
until 1822 he represented the American house 
of James & Thomas Perkins in London, Eng- 
land. In 1826 he returned to Worcester as a 
permanent resident, and during the remainder 
of his life was actively interested in local pub- 
lic affairs. In 1829 he was a Representative 
to the General Court, during the greater part 
of the time from 1827 until 1839 he was one 
of the Selectmen of the town, and from 1829 
until 1848 was an Assessor. A great lover of 
flowers and plants, he was very successful in 
their cultivation, and took great pleasure in 
laying out his spacious grounds and adorning 
them with choice plants of all descriptions. 
For many years he was a leading member and 
the treasurer of the Worcester County Horti- 
cultural Society. He possessed excellent lit- 
erary tastes, and collected a valuable library 
of several thousand volumes, which is still pre- 
served in the old homestead owned by his son, 
the Rev. George Sturgis Paine. 

Frederick William Paine married May 5, 
1822, Ann Cushing Sturgis, a daughter of the 
Hon. Russell and Elizabeth (Perkins) Sturgis. 
Six children blessed this union, and three of 
them are now living, namely : Elizabeth, widow 
of Henry Parkman Sturgis, of Salem, Mass. ; 
James Perkins, the subject of this sketch ; 
and the Rev. George Sturgis Paine, of the 
Episcopal church, who has for several years 
passed much of his time in Europe. Fred- 
erick William Paine died September 16, 1869. 
Mrs. Paine survived her husband until 1892, 
when she died at an advanced age. She was 
one of a family of sixteen children. 

James Perkins Paine was educated in the 
schools of Worcester and Northboro. As a 
young man he made frequent voyages to India 
on business, but since his marriage he has re- 
sided most of the time in this city. On May 
11, 1855, Mr. Paine married Sarah L., daugh- 
ter of Otis and Sarah Loring (House) Turner, 



of Boston, Mass., where her father was a well- 
known bank official. Mr. and Mrs. Paine 
have four children : Lois Orne, who was 
named for her great-grandmother; Rose 
Chandler; Russell Sturgis; and Alice. 



OHN HAPGOOD BROOKS, a well- 
known dairy farmer of Worcester, re- 
siding in Ward One, son of John Hap- 
good and Olive (Morse) Brooks, was 
born at Chadwick Square, near by, on May 9, 
1849. The paternal grandfather, who bore 
the same name as himself, born in Princeton, 
Mass., in 1778, died on October 18, 1864. 
This ancestor's wife, whose maiden name was 
Tabitha Lovell, died on September 26, 1863, 
at the age of eighty-three. Both were buried 
in Princeton, Mass. Of their eight or nine 
children, four sons and two daughters grew to 
maturity. The only surviving son, James 
Oliver Brooks, now over sixty-five years old, 
resides in Minnesota. 

John Hapgood Brooks, Sr. , was born in 
Princeton, January 3, 1809. On May 4, 
1837, he married Olive, a native of Dedham 
and a daughter of Lewis and Nabby (Fisher) 
Morse. She died in 1871, aged fifty-five, 
leaving only one of her eight children. The 
father was again married in 1873 to Lydia 
Eveline Keyes, of West Boylston. By this 
union there is one son, Albert Raymond 
Brooks, who resides with his mother on a part 
of the farm. The father came to Worcester 
in 1837, and engaged in farming and black- 
smithing at Greendale. His shop was located 
in Chadwick Square, where he owned con- 
siderable property. Soon after 1850 he 
bought a farm of forty acres here, which he 
subsequently enlarged until it covered about 
one hundred and fifty acres. Though he 
started in life poor, having only a small patri- 
mony, he succeeded in acquiring a comfortable 
competency. In politics he was a Republi- 
can. He was a member of the Worcester 
Common Council and in 1856 of the State 
legislature. For many years he was a Deacon 
in the Central Congregational Church and 
for some time the superintendent of its Sun- 
day-school. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



337 



Mr. Brooks, the subject of this sketch, has 
lived on the home farm since he was six years 
of age. On October 2, 1872, he was united 
in marriage with Ella Ball, of Holden, a 
daughter of Israel Manning and Mary (New- 
ton) Ball. She has been the mother of nine 
children, of whom two died in infancy. The 
rest are: Olive Marion, John Hapgood, Jr., 
Alice Warren, Ida Louise, Lewis Man